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A toll road that Premier Daniel Andrews says will help fix Melbourne's transport woes will draw tens of thousands of passengers off trains and into cars, his own top advisers say.

It's estimated Melbourne's proposed North East Link will reduce train boardings by 25,000 trips per day - sounds awful, but as usual there's more to it

Push to axe south-west rail

Posted in New South Wales Rail News on 2008-10-02 13:20:57

THE $1.36 billion South West Rail Link guaranteed by the former premier Morris Iemma could be shelved and replaced by a $50 million stabling yard under a cost-cutting proposal being pushed by senior Govern- ment officials.



Mr Iemma and former transport minister John Watkins unveiled the first stage of the link in March, which was to have been completed by 2012. But now, a firm commitment has withered before Treasury briefings on the NSW revenue shortfalls.

Sydney is in desperate shape. There are many signs, but you only

have to look at the weather to see something is badly wrong.

Can we afford to get back on the rails?

Posted in Rail News on 2012-12-16 19:27:47

AT A BUSY intersection on Melbourne's Nepean Highway, looking out over eight lanes of traffic, stands the imposing bronze figure of Sir Thomas Bent.

Amid the noise of cars and trucks, few pedestrians stop to read the text on his plinth, which gives the outline of a long political career - as speaker of the Legislative Assembly 1892-94, premier of Victoria 1904-09, parliamentary representative for Brighton for thirty-two years, and a councillor of Brighton and Moorabbin for forty-five years.

But it is Tommy Bent's surname that gives the best clue to his character, if not his impact on the city. In the early 1880s, his public and private roles - as commissioner for railways and as a property speculator - neatly overlapped. He not only promised to build railways to MPs' electorates in exchange for political support, he also pushed through suburban lines that directly boosted the value of his own subdivisions.

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