Typical Timber Sleepers?

 
  DF4D-0130 Junior Train Controller

G'day all,

From what I have seen in this thread, there are a few inconsistencies.  Some BG lines may have run 9' wide sleepers.  I know from experience that most of the S.A. BG lines were 8'6", 9" by 5" sleepers.  The main two timbers that were used were jarrah and wandoo, which were both sourced from Western Australia.  

Jarrah sleepers, they were not too bad to lift, and when we were handling them, they used to go about 75 kilograms each.  Wandoo sleepers, on the other hand, they used to weigh in at about 125 - 140 kilograms each!  And, that was after years of use on the lines!!!  

According to a timber book that I read years ago, jarrah timber has a density rating of about 800.  I am not sure what units are used to measure the density.  Wandoo, on the other hand, has a density rating of 1,500 and in the book, it was recommended for use in salt water, supporting steel!!!  

Wandoo sleepers, when cut, had a white to yellow colour, and were fairly knotty.  We tried to machine a few sleepers for timber for a bar, but the milling machine would not accept the sleepers.   Sad  Bugga!!!  

When cutting the sleepers with a freshly sharpened tungsten tipped sawblade, the jarrah sleepers were cut like a knife through soft butter.  The wandoo sleepers, on the other hand, it was a fight to get the sawblade to cut them.  It was also very rare to find termites / white ants in the wandoo sleepers...  we come to the conclusion that the timber was too hard for the termites!!!  

Ding.

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  heisdeadjim Chief Commissioner

With respect to sleepers, I have a small question so I'll use this thread.

Going through Burnley today. On the downside I notices a couple of brand spanking new wood sleepers.

I thought they were going concrete?
  Camster Chief Commissioner

Location: Geelong
With respect to sleepers, I have a small question so I'll use this thread.

Going through Burnley today. On the downside I notices a couple of brand spanking new wood sleepers.

I thought they were going concrete?
"heisdeadjim"


I think I noticed this on the Dandenong line last night too.
  Heihachi_73 Chief Commissioner

Location: Terminating at Ringwood
With respect to sleepers, I have a small question so I'll use this thread.

Going through Burnley today. On the downside I notices a couple of brand spanking new wood sleepers.

I thought they were going concrete?
"heisdeadjim"


Did you really expect them to lay concrete sleepers...on the Ringwood and Dandenong lines that actually need it? Laughing

It isn't their precious RFR/RRL lines so they couldn't give a toss.

They only lay concrete on the curves and level crossings, then stick the 1950s-era rails back on top so it's still rough as guts. Just go to Nearmap and look at any of the Metro-operated lines in Melbourne.

The only concrete sleepers at Burnley are on the Glen Waverley flyover, aside from the odd one or two which have replaced broken wooden sleepers (mostly on the Glen Waverley up track, and one single concrete sleeper visible on the centre track on Nearmap near the flyover). They're much too stingy to think of putting concrete sleepers somewhere useful like through platform 3 where the Camberwell expresses go.
  SimeonHunt Beginner

Location: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Question Can anyone advise me as to the typical weight of a timber sleeper in Victoria. From those I have seen they all appear to be the same size but I am curious how much they weigh.
Duncs

could anyone tell me roughly how much will a red gun train sleeper hold in weight ???

cheers sim
  woodford Chief Commissioner

could anyone tell me roughly how much will a red gun train sleeper hold in weight ???

cheers sim
SimeonHunt

This is probably unknown, but timber if used correctly is extremely strong and modern society underestimates it greatly which is a real pity.
  VRfan Moderator

Location: In front of my computer :-p
The Americans run their heavy locos over treated pine sleepers, so I don't see why redgum couldn't in theory be used. However, they do use a tighter sleeper spacing than us and their sleepers are more square shaped.
  cootanee Chief Commissioner

Location: North of the border!
One also needs to consider the whole of life cost of wood.

Into the future 'old growth' red gum isn't going to be overly abundant and the exercise of replacing life expired sleepers (rather than simply letting them fall to pieces) isn't going to get any cheaper.

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