Dry Creek Yard - Northen access - pre SG

 
  steam4ian Chief Commissioner

G'day all

There are some here who may have worked trains into Dry Creek yard off the Gawler line in the pre SG days.

I only ever saw the entrance from the old Pt Wakefield Road bridge, from the odd train and from photos. From none of these do I recall a cabin adjacent the junction. I suspect even the up signal protecting the points was a one arm permissive and I think there were outlying switch-locks.

My questions for expert answers are.
  • Were the junction points controlled from a cabin?
  • Did the train crew have to operate the points?
  • If so how were they reset to normal?
  • If there were outlying switch-locks from what cabin were they released?

Regards
Ian

Sponsored advertisement

  alcoworldseries Deputy Commissioner

Location: Auburn
Hi Ian, the old Dry Creek E, the site of the current crossovers, (and I think it was F) "cabins" had a release from Dry Creek cabin, yes the up signal was a permissive, the loco crew set the points once the release was given and the guard reset them once the train had cleared. Down trains leaving Dry Creek did so under signal indication.
  AFULE Chief Train Controller

Location: South Australia
G'day all

There are some here who may have worked trains into Dry Creek yard off the Gawler line in the pre SG days.

I only ever saw the entrance from the old Pt Wakefield Road bridge, from the odd train and from photos. From none of these do I recall a cabin adjacent the junction. I suspect even the up signal protecting the points was a one arm permissive and I think there were outlying switch-locks.

My questions for expert answers are.
  • Were the junction points controlled from a cabin?
  • Did the train crew have to operate the points?
  • If so how were they reset to normal?
  • If there were outlying switch-locks from what cabin were they released?

Regards
Ian


Ian,

I only recall there was a pill box (it has been a few years since I last made the movement, we would stop short of the signal (permissive I think) and switches, open the pill box contact Train Control and get permission to cross over in to the yard, if a down train was approaching he would say, right to go over after such and such had past.

We would operate and Outlying Switch Lock if I remember correctly and that would drop the Absolute Signal to Stop that protected the cross-over switches from Down movements, unlock the Switch Stand and move across, when in clear of the Catch Points that protected the Mail Line coming out of the Dry Creek yard the Guard would stop us and return the switches for normal Up/Down movements on the Gawler line. The Guard would rejoin the train and we would continue to enter the yard.

As I said to start with a long time ago, and I might be a  little out with the operation , but I think I'm close.

Regards

Rex







steam4ian
  steam4ian Chief Commissioner

Alco & Rex

Thanks for your response.

Was a shunter ever sent across from Dry Creek to do the switching?

How long was allowed for the movement?

As I see it the movement could have had both up and down lines blocked for up to 10 minutes. The OSL could need 2 minutes to time out. The operation could read as follows:- train comes to halt, engineman gets off engine and goes to pill box, fumbles for key and opens box, then phones cabin, gets response, closes and locks pill box, operates OSL, waits for time out, then the switch is reversed, the engineman climbs back in the cab, right of way is given, brakes released, train moves to yard, guard signals train clear of fouling point, train stops, guard gets off train and walks back to switch stand, guard put switches to normal, line now clear.

All the above is why I can't get interested in model trains, you just can't reproduce the operating atmosphere, even the tedium.

Regards
Ian
  alcoworldseries Deputy Commissioner

Location: Auburn
Easily 10 minutes Ian, although service frequency provided wider gaps back then, however, once the release was given as soon as the OSL door was opened the handle could be moved straight away, no time out so this allowed some respite but many times we had down services stopped at the absolute waiting for the guard to lock up, you may recall early in the era of 2000/2100 the incident where a stationary stoney was run into by an up (Gawler) resulting in extensive damage to 2008.
I am not aware of yard staff performing this function at any time, in fact I doubt in that era they would have been qualified/allowed to do it.
  justapassenger Chief Commissioner

All the above is why I can't get interested in model trains, you just can't reproduce the operating atmosphere, even the tedium.
steam4ian
You should give Train Simulator 2013 a shot. Some of the reviews I've read on the web seem to indicate the loading times add a fair leavening of tedium if you need that simulated Smile
  duttonbay Minister for Railways

All the above is why I can't get interested in model trains, you just can't reproduce the operating atmosphere, even the tedium.
"steam4ian"

Of course you can reproduce the tedium. Locos couple up to a train, and don't leave for a scale 10 minutes while the brakes are done. Trains stop at the entry to a crossing loop, pause for sufficient scale time for the fireman to change the points, and enter the loop. When they leave the loop they stop with the van clear of the turnout while the guard resets the turnout.  We had sessions where train orders were issued, and the driver of the train had to walk to the train controller to receive the order, and then walk back to the train before it could move. This simulated the time it takes to receive and repeat a train order.

You need some rules, and operators which follow the rules, and the tedium can be reproduced.

Of course, I suspect that most model railways don't operate this way, but it was a lot of fun on the Dutton Bay.
  fabricator Chief Commissioner

Location: Gawler
I wonder if anyone has fitted a dead man's switch to a model train controller ?
I'm sure that would make things tedious, might even prevent the odd crash.
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
I wonder if anyone has fitted a dead man's switch to a model train controller ?
I'm sure that would make things tedious, might even prevent the odd crash.
fabricator
I have a deadman's switch of sorts on both mainline tracks of my Kilkenny model train layout. By pushing the button the power is cut off to the tracks. It was put on there because of the odd crash or two in years gone by.

Having operated a few model railways in the past using card systems for each wagon and operating to a strict set of rules and a fast clock, you can indeed add the tedium into operating a model train. It starts out as a bit of a bad dream when you are first confronted by it though, but eventually you get the idea and it adds to the operating night to do it the way the real railways used to do it, this includes train orders and lots of other paper work as well to be done by model train operators. What you see at a Model railway exhibition is not what happens on an operating night at a lot of large model railways. Operation like this at an exhibition will bore the pants of of people that are not into railways or model railways. People go to an exhibition to see trains run and that is all they want to see.
  22-Calibre Beginner

"As I see it the movement could have had both up and down lines blocked for up to 10 minutes. The OSL could need 2 minutes to time out. The operation could read as follows:- train comes to halt, engineman gets off engine and goes to pill box, fumbles for key and opens box, then phones cabin, gets response, closes and locks pill box, operates OSL, waits for time out, then the switch is reversed, the engineman climbs back in the cab, right of way is given, brakes released, train moves to yard, guard signals train clear of fouling point, train stops, guard gets off train and walks back to switch stand, guard put switches to normal, line now clear."

Almost all correct.

The crew spoke to Metro Train Control.   The Outlying Switch Lock was released and could only be operated whilst the UP Absolute protecting the crossover at Cabin E was at STOP.  The Guard usually dropped off as the train pulled into the yard (but not always)

"All the above is why I can't get interested in model trains, you just can't reproduce the operating atmosphere, even the tedium."

Freight forwarders similarly lost interested in railways until this was rectified in the 80's by places such as Islington Freight Terminal, containers, high(er) speed non-stopping trains, 2 person crews, and all of the other "non atmospheric" realities of life.
  alcoworldseries Deputy Commissioner

Location: Auburn
See my earlier 22, Dry Creek E and all the SAR OSL's had NO timeout once released by the signalman/train control and did relaease as soon as release given and OSL door opened, any delay would have been because either some other movement was still on the release circuts or whoever gave the release was busy.

Sponsored advertisement

Subscribers: Pressman

Display from:   

Quick Reply

We've disabled Quick Reply for this thread as it was last updated more than six months ago.