Model Weathering Thread

 
  Thumpa Chief Train Controller

Location: That's on a need to know basis.
Thumpa,

Nice stuff. Couple of questions, did you weather this from photos or some where else? What year are you modelling? I guess the 80/90's via the wagon code but can you go more specific?


I made a mistake in over weathering some things because I got caught up in fun. I cant weather my hoppers to the extent you have here because I model early 70's and these hoppers weren't that bad for rust and so on.

Andrew
Bowen_Creek
(So other forum members have an understanding, Bowen_Creek and I are good mates. It has been brought to my attention that my post may have come across a bit harsh. Let me asure all forum members it is in jest, Bowen_Creek is no way at the end of a rough stick Laughing )

Mr C. AKA Bowen Creek etc...

How DARE you question my authenticity! Just remember who rusted your corrigated iron sheeting in your creek bed??? One of a kind MATE!

Yes this wagon was weather as per a mid/late 1980's "black wheat hopper". If I may draw your attention to the walk way for a start. This is of square welded mesh walkway, which was used to replaced the wooden planks priory to the all round walkway which was retro fitted during the late 1980's / early 1990's for OH&S purposes. The four letter code was prior to the "check letter" being introduced in the wagon coding as well.
In gerneral it is well documented in colour pictures of "BWH" series of wheat hoppers in such weathered states of such poor condition in both book and internet.
Examples are:

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  Bowen_Creek Station Master

(So other forum members have an understanding, Bowen_Creek and I are good mates. It has been brought to my attention that my post may have come across a bit harsh. Let me asure all forum members it is in jest, Bowen_Creek is no way at the end of a rough stick Laughing )

Mr C. AKA Bowen Creek etc...

How DARE you question my authenticity! Just remember who rusted your corrigated iron sheeting in your creek bed??? One of a kind MATE!

Yes this wagon was weather as per a mid/late 1980's "black wheat hopper". If I may draw your attention to the walk way for a start. This is of square welded mesh walkway, which was used to replaced the wooden planks priory to the all round walkway which was retro fitted during the late 1980's / early 1990's for OH&S purposes. The four letter code was prior to the "check letter" being introduced in the wagon coding as well.
In gerneral it is well documented in colour pictures of "BWH" series of wheat hoppers in such weathered states of such poor condition in both book and internet.
Examples are:

Thumpa
THUMPA...AKA MR D,

Might well you should be pulled up.....How RUDE! The younger generation indeed have little to look up to as you, SIR, are quickly becoming a grumpy old BASTARD!!
Welcome to the club!Laughing

I think it pertinent that if we have a thread of "How did you do that" that the first step be mentioned. That is of photographic evidance of time of condition. You as an experianced weatherer, would do this but I wonder how many newbies would just tear into weathering (as I did) over excited without going into depth of how bad should the weathering be.

Time, because rollingstock and Locos changed over the period and sometimes Place because western stock weathered differently(sometimes subtly) to say northern.

So I will start,
Step 1.  Collect photos of prototype to be weathered at the appropriate time and place if possible.

Andrew
  Thumpa Chief Train Controller

Location: That's on a need to know basis.
Apologies for the lateness of the reply Mr C.

What piece of rolling stock exactly are we researching? I know, the NSW LLV/GLV louvre van!Twisted Evil
Mr C knows all about them. To be a sport, I'll supply the lambs.

Since these would have to be one of the most common models to be produced over the years by various manufacturers AR Kits, Stephen Johnson Models, Protype (Those of you who are old enough to remember) and in more recent times On Track Models have produced RTR models which will the weapons of choice. Three wagons, three different era's to model.

Now finding the actual pictures is a task in its self. Internet searches come up with some results but is limited. trawling through peoples online photo collections can be rewarding but is time consuming.

Books and magazines would still have to be the best place to look, especially colour prints. I've found Train Hobby Publications to be a excellant source for reference material. Also Railway Digest, RTM and Eveleigh Press are good.

Friends private photo collection, this would more than likely be the best place to look as they may be more focused on the rolling stock rather than a railway scene in general. a print or slide can be scanned and focus can be put on the subject if captured in a general scene.

On that last subject I'll ask some contacts if I can share some pictures for the topic of weathering here on the forum.

In closing, a piece of rolling stock I have been weathering, an AR Kit MLE flat wagon, converted to a MCX/NCLX coil steel wagon. These were introduced in the late 1970's. 9 of these wagons were used with bogie exchange to run into Victoria.

This was weathered with powders on the wagon and the coil cradles with an air brush.

The Esso tanker is a work in progress...

Thumpa
  Gwiwer Rt Hon Gentleman and Ghost of Oliver Bulleid

Location: Loitering in darkest Somewhere
Some technique shots to show how it's done.   Don't worry about the loco in question - the same techniques can be applied to any vehicle you like.
First I check I have what I need on the "dirty" area of the workbench.  I currently use Carrs and AIM weathering powders and have recently obtained some of the new Humbrol ones but am not overly impressed with them.  Plastics vary and each item seems to prefer a different brand or blend of powders; there's no telling quite how things will go until you try.  A selection of small soft-hair brushes is also essential.  Sable is preferred by some professionals and I'm sure would give me better results than I get with the cheaper brushes I use.

I normally keep two mixes of powder in plastic containers and which are topped up as required.  One is a brown mix representing mud and brake dust with the other being black and greys for smoke, soot and grime.  In this view I have added some new powder to both containers but have not yet either mixed them together nor broken down the lumps which seem to afflict the Humbrol powders.

Next take one victim.  In this case a Hornby A1X "Terrier" which is a tiny tank engine of fairly basic construction and lacking in some of the finer detail evident on many other locos.  The loco is seen here in more-or-less pristine black plastic though some dust shows up on the photo.

I normally handle items to be weathered in cut squares of old T-shirt which prevents stray powder entering the mechanism or fouling the pick-ups.  Weathering is meant to be dirty; this step also prevents accidental finger prints on the work which tend not to show up until you have applied the powder and photographed the job!

For the main coating of grime I don't need to be overly delicate as it has to get just about everywhere.  I am therefore using a bigger brush, dipped lightly in the powder, and brushing that powder onto the loco from top to bottom and both from front to back and side to side; it can also be worked in around tight corners as needed.  



Work the powder all around the parts of the loco which need to be dirtied.  Remember to check underneath the buffer beams and buffers themselves and to dirty up the front and back of the cab.  The amount of powder applied can differ and will give differing results and sometimes a second coat applied to areas which are to be extremely grimy will give good results.  Another way to work weathering powders is to rub and work them in lightly with your fingertips.  This creates blurred lines and smudges which are useful in some applications.  Remember to wash AND DRY your fingers before you move on.



So far so good.  The loco no longer looks as though it has just come out of a box but some loose powder needs removing.



I don't need "speed streaks" on a tank engine which would only have shunted or worked trains at slow speeds.  But the big brush is still a handy tool for removing the excess powder.  It can be lightly blown but one tiny spot of saliva in the wrong place will undo your work.  A puffer brush would also help and is one tool I don't have currently.  The brush is drawn front to back and top to bottom over the powder removing most of the excess to the workbench via the cloth.



The rear view after removal of the excess powder - again this no longer looks like a loco straight from its box but more can be done to it.



Taking a fresh brush collect a little of the brown powder and apply gently to the brake rodding, cab steps, brakes and - in this case - the wheels which could have picked up mud and dirt from sidings or minor branch lines.



The loco is sitting on the T-shirt fabric and has had brown powder brushed on where ever I want it.



A light flick of the brush will again remove any excess.  Should you remove too much it can easily be re-applied and the process repeated.



We now have a weathered locomotive but can add some little detailed touches.   This is a rust-coloured powder which is not included in the brown mix and is being used straight from the pot.



Dab the brush straight down on top of the tank filler caps.  Work the "rust" lightly and carefully around the immediate area.  If you like you can streak it down the side of the tank by using vertical strokes from the same brush.



As before any excess is simply brushed very lightly away or - to avoid damaging detailed work - this is the one occasion where I blow it!



Tank filler detail.  Each side would typically differ.  I already have two locos with white water-streak staining one of which was illustrated in an earlier post so this one isn't going to have that detail added.  If that were desired the application process is the same as for rust and both can be brushed together but not worked too hard otherwise they will mix to create a strange pale orange stain.



Next pose the loco in decent light, photograph and review on a large screen which will show up any fingerprints, "bald spots' or other rectification needed.  This is the first stage at which I take most photos of the weathering jobs and these are usually the only ones posted



Don't forget the front and back!   There are no moulded rivets on the buffer beam of this loco which means the powder has less detail to adhere to but the result seems fair enough to me.



Finally pose alongside a Beattie well-tank to compare the size of these diminutive engines!




I don't currently seal the work.   My early experiments in doing so have had mixed results.  I tried a $2 hairspray which I still use for goods wagons where the finish is less critical and for carriage under frames.  I also had an aerosol fixative which I binned because it crazed plastic glazing.  It also didn't fix powders despite the suggestion on the tin that it can be used for pastels and weathering.

I do have an airbrush and compressor which need to be brought into use and a suitable "flat" fixative applied because unsealed powder can come off on the fingers and the weathering job can become damaged when stock is handled.  I use the T-shirt fabric for handling unsealed stock and so far little harm has come to it but that isn't a long-term solution.

I hope that offers some inspiration and thoughts.  The biggest challenge I found in weathering was starting.  Once I had taken that step the rest has been learning what works, what doesn't and the limitations of the materials.  That is an ongoing process just as we are learning all the time about aspects of this hobby.
  james13 Chief Commissioner

Location: At the Skunk Works
Nice job above, anywhere there is clear stryene/plastic you should mask it up before you weather it and clear coat.
It doesn't really matter what you use to seal a model as they all seem to frost the "glass", great for toilet windows though.

I made this jig for my wheels.

  meh Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney
Hi all,

I just updated my blog with the weathering of an NPRY wagon.

http://bigdirtyfreighttrains.blogspot.com.au/2013/07/npry-wagon-weathering-technique.html

Cheers,
Mitch
  J514 Deputy Commissioner

Location: somewhere on the broad gauge
Here's a flat top I done over the weekend.......
  Poath Junction Chief Commissioner

Location: In front of a computer most of the time.
Found a series of magazines with step-by-step weathering techniques, presented in a style very similar to the MIG "FAQ" weathering books. http://www.theweatheringmagazine.com/ . As well as the usual AFV's they also give examples using railway items such as this sample from the Issue 4 "engines fuel and oil".

Larger sample page / image can be found at http://www.theweatheringmagazine.com/engines.html
  Termite Chief Commissioner

Location: NSW
Hello All,

After reading this thread recently, I went and purchased some Tamiya weathering powders this morning. I also grabbed a Powerline VR VLEX louvre van that I'll use for the project.

I'd previously done some limited air brush weathering which I was happy with, but interested to try powders. I was able to pick up a powder application brush as well which was handy.

I'll hopefully be able to post some photo's up when I finish the van.

Thanks
Tim

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