Signal box rodding - signalling exit points

 
  Toad Montgomery Chief Commissioner

Location: Port Hedland: Team EMU want's YOU!
While scanning some of my collection it came to my attention that Wallan signal box, located on the Up platform has no rodding or wires leaving the box through the platform coping or front of the box, they are all routed via the back along the old No. 3 Road.

My question is how many other signal boxes around the state had a similar arrangement as most have it exiting through the front and platform coping.

Cheers,
TM.

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  dmgrail Junior Train Controller

Location: Wangaratta Vic. 3677
The new Bowser signal box constructed in-conjuction with the North East standardization project in 1959, had point rodding exiting the box at both the front and rear, whilst all signal wires exited through the front. There were four point rods associated with the Everton line (Levers 10, 11, 12 & 19) that passed under the standard gauge line at the rear of Bowser Box and ran between the new sg line and Siding A before passing under the Everton line to run on the Down side of that line some distance beyond the sg-bg diamond.

Daryl M Gregory
  awsgc24 Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney
Which states use "U" shaped channel iron for point rodding, and which used round water pipes?

NSW - "U".
  Ballast_Plough Chief Commissioner

Location: Lilydale, Vic
Victoria predominately used the channel rodding but round rodding could be found fairly frequently.
  awsgc24 Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney
Victoria predominately used the channel rodding but round rodding could be found fairly frequently.
Ballast_Plough

Presumably, round pipelike rodding can be bought at most hardware stores, whereas "U" rodding is a special order.

AIUI, Railcorp used to buy a special size of "Y" stake for its signal wires, until the company making them said that this item was being discontinued. A good reason to convert to colour light signals.
  Ballast_Plough Chief Commissioner

Location: Lilydale, Vic
In my limited experience, channel rodding was easier to work with - you only needed a hacksaw to cut it to length and a punch to cut the 2 bolt holes at each join. Round rodding you needed a die set to create a thread at each join.

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