Improving Eureka R class traction

 
  BillWh Beginner

Greetings all

By now I guess most owners of an R class will have worked out  their own individual method of getting their loco to pull a decent load on a layout with grades.

Like to share my experience.

I found the hinged plate covering the gap between loco and tender was stopped from moving up past a certain position..........when placed in its normal location on the tender, it was bearing down  hard  on the front of the tender. This was actually causing the back of the tender to be a little raised, with the back bogie only just being in contact with the rails. At the same time, the back of the loco was being lifted a little, taking the weight off the rear drivers and causing frequent derailment of the loco's rear bogie. Solution was to let the plate hang down on the tender draw bar (initially), and then to remove it altogether, when it fell off while I was trying to get the plug into its socket last time I ran it.

This by itself only marginally increased the pulling power. Wheels still slipped on the grades with very modest loads.

So  Bullfrog Snot was applied to the two rear drivers. Performance was improved out of sight. There are no pick-up problems and the loco can pull a more typical load up the grades on our club layout,  where before, it slipped to a stand. I feel I dont need to add any weights now.

I know some have aversions to  traction tyres. To be honest, I dont know what their beef is. If they get your loco to pull a decent load, what's the problem? I point out that Marklin, Fleischman and Roco have been using traction tyres on their steam locos for decades. And who will argue about the quality of these brands? In this case, these "painted on" traction tyres applied to my R class have turned a "disappointment" into a "very satisfied".

I found my Lima VR B class was a compatible runner with the R class. They ran well together, and I ran a lengthy train with these locos at the head. Looked great. Can show photos if anyone is interested.

......................Bill

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  NSWGR1855 Deputy Commissioner

Greetings all

By now I guess most owners of an R class will have worked out their own individual method of getting their loco to pull a decent load on a layout with grades.

Like to share my experience.

I found the hinged plate covering the gap between loco and tender was stopped from moving up past a certain position..........when placed in its normal location on the tender, it was bearing down hard on the front of the tender. This was actually causing the back of the tender to be a little raised, with the back bogie only just being in contact with the rails. At the same time, the back of the loco was being lifted a little, taking the weight off the rear drivers and causing frequent derailment of the loco's rear bogie. Solution was to let the plate hang down on the tender draw bar (initially), and then to remove it altogether, when it fell off while I was trying to get the plug into its socket last time I ran it.

This by itself only marginally increased the pulling power. Wheels still slipped on the grades with very modest loads.

So Bullfrog Snot was applied to the two rear drivers. Performance was improved out of sight. There are no pick-up problems and the loco can pull a more typical load up the grades on our club layout, where before, it slipped to a stand. I feel I dont need to add any weights now.

I know some have aversions to traction tyres. To be honest, I dont know what their beef is. If they get your loco to pull a decent load, what's the problem? I point out that Marklin, Fleischman and Roco have been using traction tyres on their steam locos for decades. And who will argue about the quality of these brands? In this case, these "painted on" traction tyres applied to my R class have turned a "disappointment" into a "very satisfied".

I found my Lima VR B class was a compatible runner with the R class. They ran well together, and I ran a lengthy train with these locos at the head. Looked great. Can show photos if anyone is interested.

......................Bill
BillWh

Hi Bill,
Yes bull frog snot works with the Eureka R class for the short term without any problem with electrical pickup simply because the Eureka models have full tender pick up as well as locomotive driver pickup. Eventually the bull frog snot will wear off, placing an extra layer of insulation on your track, resulting in more frequent track cleaning to maintain good electrical pickup. No doubt some of the worn off snot will also end up on wheels.

I saw a Eureka R class, extra weight in boiler domes and a sheet of lead in the cab roof, springs on trucks removed, pull a greater than scale load up a helix with a steeper than typical VR grade. No snot to cause extra maintenance issues in the future. As for models of Australian steam with traction tires, in my opinion it's just a toy train solution.

Terry Flynn.
  linton78 Train Controller

Location: South Coast NSW
Greetings all

By now I guess most owners of an R class will have worked out  their own individual method of getting their loco to pull a decent load on a layout with grades.

Like to share my experience.

I found the hinged plate covering the gap between loco and tender was stopped from moving up past a certain position..........when placed in its normal location on the tender, it was bearing down  hard  on the front of the tender. This was actually causing the back of the tender to be a little raised, with the back bogie only just being in contact with the rails. At the same time, the back of the loco was being lifted a little, taking the weight off the rear drivers and causing frequent derailment of the loco's rear bogie. Solution was to let the plate hang down on the tender draw bar (initially), and then to remove it altogether, when it fell off while I was trying to get the plug into its socket last time I ran it.

This by itself only marginally increased the pulling power. Wheels still slipped on the grades with very modest loads.

So  Bullfrog Snot was applied to the two rear drivers. Performance was improved out of sight. There are no pick-up problems and the loco can pull a more typical load up the grades on our club layout,  where before, it slipped to a stand. I feel I dont need to add any weights now.

I know some have aversions to  traction tyres. To be honest, I dont know what their beef is. If they get your loco to pull a decent load, what's the problem? I point out that Marklin, Fleischman and Roco have been using traction tyres on their steam locos for decades. And who will argue about the quality of these brands? In this case, these "painted on" traction tyres applied to my R class have turned a "disappointment" into a "very satisfied".

I found my Lima VR B class was a compatible runner with the R class. They ran well together, and I ran a lengthy train with these locos at the head. Looked great. Can show photos if anyone is interested.

......................Bill
"BillWh"


Hi Bill,

I don't have anything that I need to use bullfrog snot on but was wondering how the locomotive tracks with this stuff applied. Does the locomotive rock and roll with this on the tyres or is it so thin and consistent that it is undetectable?

Linton
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
Traction tyres on a lot of models are only there because the model is made of light weight materials so the manufacturer instead of adding more weight into the model simply adds traction tyres to it an problem solved sort of. Traction tyres do not last long though and when they slip on a wheel they can have the opposite effect if they do it. Yes Marklin etc have been doing it for years I even have some Marklin stuff myself. But I much prefer a smooth wheel to a traction tyre on a locomotive of any type. A traction tyre comes of or comes loose through stretching and you are back to how you started. Extra weight in a locomotive helps a lot and is a lot easier as well in most cases.

Bullfrog snot, now while I don't agree with Terry on a lot  but I tend to agree with him on this it will eventually wear away depending on how often you run a loco and how steep the grade is. So as a temporary fix it does the job but how often will you have to reapply it over the years though. Adding weight to a loco is still the best move if it is possible. Do it once and it is done! Any loco with a traction tyre or Bullfrog Snot will leave a layer of dirt and gunk on your rails so you end up having to clean them all the time, more work for you there. Metal wheels on metal rails are not quite self cleaning but it is close. They will keep rails cleaner than is otherwise. At the NRM at Port Adelaide the locos have traction tyres and as soon as derailments start on one particular track and not all in the one spot the thing to look for is a traction tyre that has broken and come off. I hate traction tyres as they are not easy to replace all the time. But I put up with them there because the locomotives are dirt cheap to buy in the first place and the locomotives we use most times out last an expensive model.
  BillWh Beginner

Hi Bill,

I don't have anything that I need to use bullfrog snot on but was wondering how the locomotive tracks with this stuff applied. Does the locomotive rock and roll with this on the tyres or is it so thin and consistent that it is undetectable?

Linton
linton78

This application was done by a fellow club member who regularly uses Bullfrog Snot on some of his vast collection of (usually expensive) locos. He says the amount you put on, if you do it properly, is so miniscule that one bottle should last for years. He put a hardly noticeable
amount on each wheel so evenly that the loco runs true and smooth.
It remains to be seen how long it lasts.
The use of this stuff on the wheels of a few locos which run on our club layout hasnt seemed to affect the cleanliness of the rails. If there is a spot which gets a bit dirty, a quick clean with track cleaning fluid or the rough side of a piece of Masonite easily fixes it (no abrasive track rubbers, thanks).
I might add, my Lima B class, the one with just the one powered bogie, and tyres on two of the wheels of that power bogie, stock standard, by itself, easily pulled the lengthy train around the club layout without even slowing down on the grades. The R class in front was just cosmetic decoration.
Happy modelling..................Bill
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
While obviously the Bullfrog Snot works I personally like to make a once only fix to a locomotive to get it running like it should. Sure you have fix little things now and then that go wrong with a locomotive, but having to reapply Bull Frog Snot ever so often would tell me there has to be a better way. That is why I would if it can be done add more weight into the locomotive more than adding Bull Frog Snot to wheels.

It might have been better if Eureka models had actually provided a traction tyre on the wheel in the first place. And packaged into the box a normal set of wheels and a box spanner or what ever, then you can replace them with if you like. I have a GS 4 that this was done, it is a simple matter to change them over though. This might be a better solution in the future, will make it a bit dearer for sure, but at least your loco will then pull a sausage off, of a greasy plate. As most complain about the haulage capabilities!

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