Help identifying old bus 1920s/1930s

 
  Galron Chief Commissioner

Location: Werribee, Vic
hi all.
Going through the family photos as part of some genealogy work, this photo below was stumbled upon. We believe it is circa 1920s/1930s and may have been taken in the Korrumburra area. After a make and model information if anyone has it. Looks similar to this Renault bus but the engine and wheels are all wrong.

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  RustyRick Chief Commissioner

Location: South West Vic
No idea what it is, but try posting here - http://www.hcvc.com.au

The shape of the wheels looks fairly distinctive.

Cheers

Rick
  Galron Chief Commissioner

Location: Werribee, Vic
Thanks for that. made a post over there and will see what happens.
  wurx Lithgovian Ambassador-at-Large

Location: The mystical lost principality of Daptovia
FWIW, that seems to be less of a bus and more of a charabanc.

Charabancs would sort of qualify as a common ancestor to both the bus and the stretch limo.
  Bogong Chief Commissioner

Location: Essendon Aerodrome circa 1980
Yep, it looks like a charabanc. I research (and occasionally write) a fair bit of mountain history and in the years after the First World War through the 1920's there are lots of reports of people hiring charabancs and heading for the hills.

By the late 1930's there are only reports of people getting busses (or for the rock bottom end of the market, the sort of people who stay in backpacker hostels today, furniture vans with light wooden benches bolted down the middle). So from my reading and research, I'd guess that charabancs appear to have died out in the early 1930's.

A couple of years ago, I corresponded with Viv Worthington, the woman reponsible for this site http://www.ansettpioneer.com/ She was quite pleasant and keen to promote the memory of those early bus pioneers. (I think she is descended from them?) She has also written a book on the subject, so if anyone wants to research charabancs, an email to her might be a good start.

Here's a pic from somewhere in Victoria that is on the website entitled "A charabanc with passengers setting off on a day trip".

  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
This Trove article has a newspaper advertisement for New England Motor Company's long distance Brisbane Lismore Grafton 1935 service using what it described as coaches. The drawing perhaps would be expected to be modern for the times otherwise they would not use it in an advertisement. You may need to move the page around till you locate the drawing towards lower left of page   [size=2][font=Calibri, sans-serif]http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/35933618[/font][/size]
  wurx Lithgovian Ambassador-at-Large

Location: The mystical lost principality of Daptovia
Yep, it looks like a charabanc. I research (and occasionally write) a fair bit of mountain history and in the years after the First World War through the 1920's there are lots of reports of people hiring charabancs and heading for the hills.

By the late 1930's there are only reports of people getting busses (or for the rock bottom end of the market, the sort of people who stay in backpacker hostels today, furniture vans with light wooden benches bolted down the middle). So from my reading and research, I'd guess that charabancs appear to have died out in the early 1930's.

A couple of years ago, I corresponded with Viv Worthington, the woman reponsible for this site http://www.ansettpioneer.com/ She was quite pleasant and keen to promote the memory of those early bus pioneers. (I think she is descended from them?) She has also written a book on the subject, so if anyone wants to research charabancs, an email to her might be a good start.

Here's a pic from somewhere in Victoria that is on the website entitled "A charabanc with passengers setting off on a day trip".

Bogong

Coincidence perhaps, but the charabanc above appears to be near identical to the one in Galron's post.

The wheels look right, and perhaps the radiator & bonnet too (hard to tell with the latter, as they're obscured in this pic).

The body looks also to be a match, but that can be misleading, as in this era, automotive bodies were not always built by the manufacturer. This was particularly true of passenger cars of the day. It's quite possible that that style of body could have been fitted to any number of different chassis from, say, International, Fageol, American La France, White, just to name a few possibilities.
  Bogong Chief Commissioner

Location: Essendon Aerodrome circa 1980
Well the wheels are a bit different, the ones in Viv Worthington's pic have 6 spokes and the ones in Galron's have 8 spokes, so they're probably not the same vehicle. But it's notable that the tyres of both are hard rubber, although I have seen photos of charabancs with more modern inflatable rubber tyres.

Yeah, in the 1920's the chassis and mechanicals were generally built by the car company, with manufacturing and fit out of the car bodies contracted out to coachbuilders. That's how Holden got their start in Adelaide, building car bodies for imported General Motors chassis.

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