Forthcoming State Election and public transport

 
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
Geoff Brock indicated to the ABC late yesterday that he would be more interested in supporting whichever party demonstrated the most 'stability'.  Observers took that to mean that he would support a Weatherill-led government assuming at this stage that Labor has one more seat than the Liberals.

The cries of 'we wuz robbed' get louder with Chris Pyne and Alexander Downer (amongst others) claiming that there is a gerrymander in South Australia favouring the Labor Party.  Funny because I don't recall him crying 'gerrymander' in 1998 when Howard lost the popular vote but won the election? Obviously gerrymanders only apply when they work against you.

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  steam4ian Chief Commissioner

My politics are well know here but I can't help thinking the best outcome is for the independents to side with the incumbent government to get a more stable result.

There could be a cost to the future of both of them but then they are unlikely to want to go for yet another term. That will depend on how much they allow themselves to become government lackeys or maintain their independence. I suspect they are both canny enough to be able to work it in the favour of their electorates and to their own advantage. It would mean forgoing any speaker role or ministries.

In the longer run this would work to the advantage of the Liberals because potential instability will make the government less effective and even more a financial disaster. I give it about two years until the independents give up cross the floor and topple the government leading to a fresh election. You cannot spend your way out of debt, nor hope that in two and a half years a federal Labor government will bail them out.

Don your comments are unfair because this "gerrymander" situation has persisted for some time and has been repeated over a number of election results. Had it been a once off your comments, as most times, are quite reasonable.

Ian
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
Ian, reading Anthony Green's interpretation of the situation I don't feel that the word 'gerrymander' is appropriate in South Australia, Labor just happened to win in the marginal seats needed to form government.  It was a strategy that Rann took to the 2010 election and it appears to have worked again - the southern suburbs of Adelaide look to be the place where elections are won and lost and unfortunately Marshall just didn't pick up those crucial seats for the Liberals (yet again).

Anyone who wins the popular vote is entitled to cry 'gerrymander' but it doesn't necessarily make it true.
  steam4ian Chief Commissioner

Don

The southern suburbs seats are more socially diverse that some of the northern seats so there are pockets of left and right rather than uniformly one or the other.

Fortunately my electorate was one that did change hands, not surprising, we had a nobody member who only appeared about two months out from the election. He lost in spite of an attempt to shore up his position by a relatively popular independent.

I agree the word gerrymander does not apply as in the same sense of 1960s SA or 1970s Queensland, that's why I enclosed it in " ".

If people want to win a seat they have to start campaigning from the day after the election. In the southern suburbs of which I am familiar there is very little social cohesion and it is hard to generate a community identity. Believe me I have tried in another area which it is not polite to discuss at dinner (No it is not sex!).

Ian
  SAR526 Chief Train Controller

Location: Adelaide, South Australia.
Anyone who wins the popular vote is entitled to cry 'gerrymander' but it doesn't necessarily make it true.
don_dunstan

The present situation was originated by the Liberals, and electorate boundaries ever since have been adjusted by impartial electoral officials to achieve as nearly as possible a balance of Labor and Liberal voters in each electorate. As much as a single member for each electorate system can achieve fairness it has been done. The most notorious of all gerrymanders in Australia occurred when S.A. country peoples' votes were worth multiples of those of their city cousins and Tom Playford reigned over us for many years.

Despite his extreme Baptist social conservatism, he was in other ways a very good Premier who did 'socialist' things that brought South Australia to great prosperity and made us for a time the most industrialized state per head of population. Ironically that has led to our present situation because Federal 'free trade' (='giving foreigners concessions that they deny us') policies have destroyed our once burgeoning and very varied manufacturing base, but that is hardly Tom's or our fault.

As for Abbott and Pyne, they can scream all they like but when they start to be open about their hidden Tea Party agenda borrowed from the worst elements of the USA rednecks, and honour their pre-election 'promises' I may gain some respect for them. We'd also have had just a small amount of money to spend on worthwhile things like a heavy duty double track railway linking Brisbane to Adelaide via Sydney and Melbourne, instead of funding Middle Eastern wars that were none of our business and have left the world in an arguably much worse situation than obtained when the 'Liberals' got us into them to please their wise and all knowing friends like 'Dubya'. Don't forget the scandal that was Viet Nam either. At least that had one advantage. It gave us some of our best and most industrious citizens.

Like it or not, the Rann/Weatherill governments have brought about more progress in infrastructure development in their term than has been attempted or achieved in very many years before them. When the S.A. liberals cease literally walking away from pertinent questions and make hard and fast promises as to what they will do to build upon what has been achieved by Labor, I might begin to take them seriously as anything other than menaces to progress and to the prosperity of the great majority of Australians. The 'trickle down effect' of making the rich richer by government concessions is the biggest lie in all of the many in the false 'science' of Economics where diametrically opposed views are legion..
  SAR526 Chief Train Controller

Location: Adelaide, South Australia.
In the southern suburbs of which I am familiar there is very little social cohesion and it is hard to generate a community identity. Believe me I have tried in another area which it is not polite to discuss at dinner (No it is not sex!).

Ian
steam4ian

Oh Ian! Do tell!

Brian.
  steam4ian Chief Commissioner

Brian there are two topics one should not discuss; politics and ..... .

We have enough trouble on this forum with politics so let's leave religion out of it.

I am interested in your comments about the Tea Party. Like you I think they are an abomination, not really relevant to 21st century USA and even less so to Australia. Unfortunately some people who I otherwise have matters in common post Tea Party stuff on Facebook; you will be pleased to know they feel the sharpness of my comments.

I know your politics and that's fair enough for you but please don't get dragged into Labor's desperate efforts to mire Abbott's name by repetitive sneers, it will back fire. I watched question time earlier this week and watched Shorten get an even shorter end of the stick, it was sad. Like many I hoped Bill Shorten would be a great hope for the Labor party and so for Australia. I hope it is early days.

Respectfully yours
Ian
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
Ian: Yeah never discuss religion at dinner - I've lost a few friends to religion and people don't seem to like you not taking it seriously so I just keep my mouth shut now. As I get older I realise that people are entitled to believe whatever trash they like as long as nobody else gets hurt.

In relation to the 'tea party' thing; perhaps people might have been frightened of a possible Tory agenda from Marshall on things like the sale of SA Water or big state-wide job cuts in the public service. The independents are probably right to side with whoever has the most seats anyway because we've had nothing but trouble here in Victoria with our own minority government situation... I think it's possible we'll have to go to the polls here before our next set election date (November this year) because of the war Geoff Shaw is having on the Liberal Party. At the moment he's threatening to not help them pass the budget and Napthine is looking really powerless.

Weatherill has a chance in the next few days to repeat the 2002 election and show how much of a consensus-builder he can be - like Rann.
  SAR526 Chief Train Controller

Location: Adelaide, South Australia.
......let's leave religion out of it.

Agreed – except for when the religiously inclined seek to impose their own standards on everyone else by law, as a Victorian politician is currently seeking to do in the matter of women's rights to control their own fertility. I come from a similar religious background to Tom's and I have considerable respect for his essential decency and kindliness which came from his faith, but it is a matter of record that his conservatism affected his attitude to social reforms which were left to Dunstan with whom Tom had divergent views but also a warm personal friendship.

I am interested in your comments about the Tea Party. Like you I think they are an abomination, not really relevant to 21st century USA and even less so to Australia.

We disagree on some things, but I have always respected your opinions. We both want a better and kinder society and we both support the improvement of our rail and other public transport modes, though we differ on how much debt we can afford in providing it. As for the Tea Party, fundamentalist religious intolerance is a very large part of their politics and 'John Stuart Mills' liberals like me (and I believe you) who are somewhat left or right of centre, have every reason to oppose them as dangerous to our basic democratic freedoms. That said, I will avoid further discussion of the subject.

I know your politics and that's fair enough for you but please don't get dragged into Labor's desperate efforts to mire Abbott's name....

We'll have to disagree there I am afraid. I cannot forget his methods in opposition or, among other matters of policy, his stated refusal to fund improvements in public transport for the cities.  

Like many I hoped Bill Shorten would be a great hope for the Labor party and so for Australia. I hope it is early days.

So do I. I too find his performance very uninspiring at the moment.

Like you, I would wish that discussion here were exclusively rail related. Unfortunately the glaringly obvious deficiencies in  Australian rail infrastructure compared with those of comparable countries are due to the lack of political will over many long years to plan and fund the necessary improvements. So, reluctantly, I have to point out where, in my opinion, the faults lie, in the probably forlorn hope that someone, somewhere and at sometime will do something.

With my regards,

Brian.
steam4ian
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
Brian - just in relation to Abbott's intransigence on public transport, he's got the whole thing the wrong way around. Even the extremely conservative and anti-socialised anything should be able to see the benefits of an efficient and competitive public transport system; it takes traffic off the roads and in turn makes cities much more attractive places to be. It makes conditions much easier for the people who choose to continue driving; we can't continue to have this really crazy exponential growth (in Sydney and Melbourne) without some big money being spent to provide effective alternatives for people who can't or don't want to drive everywhere. At least we got the Regional Fast Rail funded over here but there's several more things that need doing; I'm sure the other major cities are all in the same boat.

Just on topic again with the election - Geoff Brock and Bob Such have now said 'no more discussions till the results are finalised' which should be Monday or Tuesday at the latest. At that time they're both going to meet with Weatherill and Marshall one last time before announcing their decisions - I gather they are intending to vote in a bloc?
  witsend Chief Commissioner

Location: Front RH Seat of a School Bus
Just on topic again with the election - Geoff Brock and Bob Such have now said 'no more discussions till the results are finalised' which should be Monday or Tuesday at the latest. At that time they're both going to meet with Weatherill and Marshall one last time before announcing their decisions - I gather they are intending to vote in a bloc?
don_dunstan

It will only take one of them to make a Labor Minority. Both are needed to make a Liberal Minority.
  justapassenger Minister for Railways

It looks like it is all over for the Liberals now, with Bob Such on sick leave it now comes down to Geoff Brock choosing between supporting a Labor minority government or going back to the polls for another election. An early election would be good news for nobody, so we'll surely get the Labor endorsement from Brock.

Expect the response to this from the Liberals to be the same as the other big sore losers from the last few months (the English and South African cricket teams) - sour-faced whinging and bitchy internal knife-fights.
You need an odd number of seats so there can be a winner ...
"kipioneer"
No you don't, the House of Representatives works okay with 150 despite not having proportional representation. If there is a genuine draw then you simply go back to the polls, or the parties would work out a compromise since the last thing they would want for the sake of their popularity is to inflict another election on the people.

The main effect with proportional representation by way of "top-up" seats is that it would break the Labor-Liberal duopoly which currently holds 96% of the House of Assembly despite having only 80% of the primary vote. Unless one party actually got well over 50% of the statewide primary vote (which would be very unlikely), every election would see either a coalition of parties in government rather than just one party - as is the case in just about every Parliament across Europe.
... and what happens to the Legislative Council?  

Do we add another 11 or 12 members to the assembly or take them from the Legislative Council?

Perhaps halve its size and restrict its role ...
"kipioneer"
Keep it as a House of Review for the first one or two terms of the new proportional House and then abolish it - maybe increasing the size of the House to 50 districts and 15 top-up seats for the first term once the Council is completely. Having two chambers at state level (plus federal parliament and local councils) is making us over-governed and it would be better to have one chamber with more diverse representation instead. It's instructive to note that the USA is the only other notable country which has bicameral legislatures for second-level administrative divisions like states/provinces - and look how well they're going with major cities declaring bankruptcy and nation getting within 12 hours of defaulting on its debts.

I can't see halving the size as being a good move even for an interim period, 11 seats would be too small to function. Only one restriction would be necessary - allowing the House to vote with a 60% supermajority to re-pass a Bill that the Council had voted down and send it straight to the Governor.

Allowing sitting MLCs who have been in for only four years of their eight year term to fill any of their party's top-up seats at the first election for a single House could have merit.
... and roll the other half into the "top up" seats or simply abolish it though I am not entirely comfortable with the concept of the executive (premier and ministers) controlling parliament.
"kipioneer"
With the near impossibility of one party ever getting a majority under a "top-up" proportional representation system, the need for parties to work together would function as an inbuilt safeguard against things getting excessive.

Further safeguards could be introduced such as recall elections, citizen-initiated referenda and full transparency of political party membership (all members' names and addresses published, no concurrent membership of multiple parties, publication of membership resignation letter required before being allowed to stand for election as an endorsed candidate for a different party or as an Independent).
  SAR526 Chief Train Controller

Location: Adelaide, South Australia.

The main effect with proportional representation by way of "top-up" seats is that it would break the Labor-Liberal duopoly which currently holds 96% of the House of Assembly despite having only 80% of the primary vote. Unless one party actually got well over 50% of the statewide primary vote (which would be very unlikely), every election would see either a coalition of parties in government rather than just one party - as is the case in just about every Parliament across Europe.............

.......Further safeguards could be introduced such as recall elections, citizen-initiated referenda and full transparency of political party membership (all members' names and addresses published, no concurrent membership of multiple parties, publication of membership resignation letter required before being allowed to stand for election as an endorsed candidate for a different party or as an Independent).
justapassenger

I too would like Proportional Representaion adopted as JaP has suggested. Our 'Winner Takes All' approach is unfair. An advantage of having a fair representation of all shades of opinion is that thinking voters are rarely one eyed party hacks on the one hand and on the other almost never the kind of swinging voters who seem to take pride on knowing almost nothing about the issues and vote according to the state of their bowels on election day. I for one agree with some policies of both major parties and disagree with others, though you all know that I am an unashamed left winger on most issues.

I would like to see the best minds in the house be given the ministries that best suit their areas of expertise. We have seen the success that the National Party member Kayleen Maywald made in representing the Riverland's interests and South Australian rights to a fair share of the Murray River flow as a Minister in a Labor state government. What a job would Tim Fischer have done if he'd been the Minister of Transport of a Labor government! Tom Playford may have been an LCL premier, but he has been regarded as 'the best Labor Premier ever' by many people and, though I mightn't go quite as far as that, I largely agree with them.

I agree with JaP's list of proposed safeguards. I also strongly believe that every candidate for office should be required to publish a standard questionnaire on his opinions on controversial issues, and a complete list of his business and other public interests. Why in selecting those whose votes can profoundly adversely affect our interests should we have to buy a pig in a poke? That is the only area where a person's religious affiliations have any legitimate public interest, but it is a vitally important one to the large number of citizens who make up substantial and often hidden minorities in any country.

Lastly, I think that if the present electoral system is to be retained, all candidates for office should be chosen by the members of the local branch of the party concerned. State executives would have the right to propose candidates other than those who actually live in the electorate, but the local members directly involved should make the final decision and work to have their choice elected. It goes without saying that that candidate would need to be active in local affairs and known as such to his fellow citizens.
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
Labor it is - another four years of Weatherill.

Geoff Brock announced half an hour ago that he will go with Labor in part because Bob Such has apparently gone on sick leave for 2 months and won't be able to sit in parliament for a while. Geoff will also be the Minister for Regional Development and Minister for Local/State Government Relations.  The independents decided to get it out there today so that Jay could get on with being Premier of South Australia effective immediately.

Thoughts, feelings, comments?
  SAR526 Chief Train Controller

Location: Adelaide, South Australia.
Labor it is - another four years of Weatherill.

Geoff Brock announced half an hour ago that he will go with Labor in part because Bob Such has apparently gone on sick leave for 2 months and won't be able to sit in parliament for a while. Geoff will also be the Minister for Regional Development and Minister for Local/State Government Relations. The independents decided to get it out there today so that Jay could get on with being Premier of South Australia effective immediately.

Thoughts, feelings, comments?
don_dunstan

Hooray! At least the rail projects stand chance of being completed. I hope that Mr. Brock gets his wish for more country development. Of course the greatest things to bring about an end to the disadvantages of living in the country are Federal responsibilities.

One is the installation of FIBRE to the BUILDING NBN which would enable country businesses and farmhouses to compete on a more level playing field and end the cultural isolation which I suffered years ago in kerosene lamp lit houses with only a battery wireless to keep me in touch with the world. I will never forget it, and moved to Melbourne as a consequence.

The other is better transport options, particularly in bringing our railways into the mid Twentieth Century as a first hopeful step in bringing them into the Twenty First in some distant future.

We know where the 'Libs' stand on both, don't we.
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
There's a lot of extremely unhappy people commenting on the Advertiser story on this development today.

Someone mentioned that Bob Such has had problem with prostate cancer before therefore it's likely that's what his illness is. Even if he has to quit because of this health issue and force a by-election, Geoff Brock will still be voting with them - although he did mention something conditional about 'as long as Jay Weatherill is premier' or something along those lines but otherwise seemed to be fairly solid in his support.

The thing that's dominated the comments section is that Geoff Brock left a voice-mail for Steve Marshall telling him that he had decided to go with Weatherill, many people saying he should have waited till he got called back to break the bad news.
  Aaron The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: University of Adelaide SA
It's not been said officially, but I suspect Bob's cancer has returned, or he's had some otherwise bad news along that line. Not good, and I wish him well.
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
Hooray! At least the rail projects stand chance of being completed.
SAR526

I can't help but worry about where the money will continue to come from - but it's unlikely that the states won't all agree to an increase in GST.  All state governments face the same dilemma with a high need for infrastructure but no money, I suppose at least things are getting done in SA even if they had to borrow for it.

The 5-10 year plan for 4 new tram/light rail lines is a good thing for Adelaide too but it all depends on how revenues go I suppose.

I wonder if Tony Abbott will cancel those defence contracts in retaliation for electing a Labor government!
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Labor will retain power in South Australia.  So what transport projects will now be completed?
  K-Class Chief Train Controller

Location: Melbourne
Labor will retain power in South Australia. So what transport projects will now be completed?
bevans

Easy, none as the state has no money except what comes from the feds and the feds are not going to give any money for public transport.
  SAR526 Chief Train Controller

Location: Adelaide, South Australia.
Easy, none as the state has no money except what comes from the feds and the feds are not going to give any money for public transport.
K-Class

I am sure that K Class (Vctorian Steam?), living in Canada is a veritable expert on South Australian affairs, like many out-of-staters who know little or nothing about a state which is in many ways (and always has been) a leader in this country – such as more wind generation, and once more plantation timber, than all of the other states put together.

Yes we can expect little or nothing from the Feds, but there is nothing new about that. We have as long as I can remember received less than our fair share of infrastructure money, going back beyond the huge subsidy to W.A. rail instead of the standard gauge conversion from Broken Hill to Port Augusta that was ready to go (see WAGR-CR-SAR's Ron Fitch), and being expected to seal a road that in South Australian value is a road to nowhere to facilitate traffic across our territory mainly to benefit other states and (like Victoria) have our country rail system ruined to favour the 4'8½" gauge while the state which was guilty of creating the chaos got off scot free.

What you foreigners don't seem to know is that Jay Weatherill has identified administrative savings which will enable ongoing work on electrification and a surplus in three years. Messrs Such (I hope that he survives what seems to be a recurrent cancer) and Brock, both knowledgeable and honourable men, can see (like others without blue coloured blinkers) the huge changes that are happening in Adelaide's development that are making it among the ten top places in which to live (sorry Melbourne, your traffic density has killed any further chance of your ever regaining that title) according to US and British judges. Having seen a good deal of the world, lived in Melbourne, and knowing the other capitals, I agree with them. Now come out of your kennels and bark at this old and mangy dog.
  justapassenger Minister for Railways

I agree with JaP's list of proposed safeguards. I also strongly believe that every candidate for office should be required to publish a standard questionnaire on his opinions on controversial issues, and a complete list of his business and other public interests.
"SAR526"
This is a fair idea, freedom of information in South Australia is currently a complete joke. My demand from 14 months ago for all information relating to the competition for the EMU procurement contract has still not even been acknowledged, let alone fulfilled.

In some European countries certain election pledges are legally binding, and if the Prime Minister does not make all reasonable efforts to implement them they can be dismissed by the head of state (i.e. a president, monarch or monarch's vice-regent) and an election called or another coalition of parties invited to form a government.

I would add the abolishment of the Adelaide City Council and mergers between suburban local governments (for fewer larger councils) to everything I already posted - and possibly the temporary return of capital punishment for a couple of the current councillors. The ACC has forgotten that they are the custodians of the capital city which belongs to the whole state, and the current arrangements there are somewhat less democratic than the Crimean Secession referendum!
Easy, none as the state has no money except what comes from the feds and the feds are not going to give any money for public transport.
"K-Class"
I wouldn't quite say none, but the coming years are going to be tough for SA regardless of who got to make the trip across King William Road to see Admiral Scarce.
Labor it is - another four years of Weatherill.
"don_dunstan"
I would be surprised if he lasted four years, keeping control of the whip with absolutely no margin for error will be tough work. Even if he keeps the whip, there's always the problem of  The Faceless Men (South Australian Labor is dominated by the shoppes' union and their top fat cats Don Farrell and Peter Malinauskas) replacing him with a fresher face if his personal popularity drops badly. He'll be well aware of that, since it was of course how he got the job when Rann and Foley were deposed.
The thing that's dominated the comments section is that Geoff Brock left a voice-mail for Steve Marshall telling him that he had decided to go with Weatherill, many people saying he should have waited till he got called back to break the bad news.
"don_dunstan"
Tough call on that bit, but I think Brock got it right. Both independents have done an outstanding job of actively taking steps to avoid encouraging a ridiculous media circus as bad as the aftermath of the 2010 Federal election, and that alone has raised my opinion of both as men who were worthy of taking on such a significant responsibility.
It's not been said officially, but I suspect Bob's cancer has returned, or he's had some otherwise bad news along that line. Not good, and I wish him well.
"Aaron"
It looks to me like he had a significant appointment scheduled during the last week once the election campaign was up, and the timescale currently being talked about (2-3 months) is about right for a course of chemo and radio treatment. Hopefully he'll be back at his best not long after, whether that be in parliament or (like the controversial central character of a documentary I watched last night) going off to win a whole lot of bike races after recovering.

The silver lining from this is that it is yet another example of the outstanding amount of respect Australian politicians have for each other despite their battles in their 'business' arena. The acknowledgement by Christopher Pyne of the important personal support he received from Kevin Rudd during his wife's difficult pregnancy is the best example I can think of - primarily a great example because it involved two of the most combative politicians in the history of Australia!
  kipioneer Chief Commissioner

Location: Aberfoyle Park
I rather feel for Geoff Brock - in the end he really had no choice.  Back Labor or a new election.

If I were an independent I would rather the government had a clear, but not large, majority in its own right.   Much less demanding, and I would still have influence.
  K-Class Chief Train Controller

Location: Melbourne
I am sure that K Class (Vctorian Steam?), living in Canada is a veritable expert on South Australian affairs, like many out-of-staters who know little or nothing about a state which is in many ways (and always has been) a leader in this country – such as more wind generation, and once more plantation timber, than all of the other states put together.

Yes we can expect little or nothing from the Feds, but there is nothing new about that. We have as long as I can remember received less than our fair share of infrastructure money, going back beyond the huge subsidy to W.A. rail instead of the standard gauge conversion from Broken Hill to Port Augusta that was ready to go (see WAGR-CR-SAR's Ron Fitch), and being expected to seal a road that in South Australian value is a road to nowhere to facilitate traffic across our territory mainly to benefit other states and (like Victoria) have our country rail system ruined to favour the 4'8½" gauge while the state which was guilty of creating the chaos got off scot free.

What you foreigners don't seem to know is that Jay Weatherill has identified administrative savings which will enable ongoing work on electrification and a surplus in three years. Messrs Such (I hope that he survives what seems to be a recurrent cancer) and Brock, both knowledgeable and honourable men, can see (like others without blue coloured blinkers) the huge changes that are happening in Adelaide's development that are making it among the ten top places in which to live (sorry Melbourne, your traffic density has killed any further chance of your ever regaining that title) according to US and British judges. Having seen a good deal of the world, lived in Melbourne, and knowing the other capitals, I agree with them. Now come out of your kennels and bark at this old and mangy dog.
SAR526

Growing up in the Adelaide hills and still having family there and also still regularly still listening to Adelaide ABC radio from inter state and overseas I do feel I have a fair knowledge and understanding of things SA.

The SA Labor government has done some "great" infrastructure spending in the last few years thanks to the Labor Feds throwing around cash like it is going out of fashion, especially to help there fellow Labor governed states. Now that The feds are Liberal and they have made their stance very clear on not helping in any way to put funds towards public transport. I hope that policy changes but there is a change of federal leadership I cant see this happening.

Labors plan to electrify the line to Gawler from state money will take a very long time I expect to see the first signs of construction heading north about 9 months before the next election, by then they will hopefully have at least enough to extend the overhead to get to Dry Creek yards.

The Millswood trial will probably happen but this is a relatively low cost trial. The reality is that there is no money for any major infrastructure projects.

SA is a great state but has been servery mismanaged by both sides of politics for most of my life and it has been at its worst under the current Rann/Wetheral labor governments.

Matt
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
Now come out of your kennels and bark at this old and mangy dog.
SAR526

Don't know that we need to bark at you, Brian, a lot of what you say makes perfect sense.

There's been a diminishing quality of life here in Melbourne, I can attest to that as a resident. Traffic congestion in particular is turning what was once an amble to your destination into a crawl between lights; the move to build the $10 billion East-West tunnel (the only option presented as a traffic-management measure) is patently inadequate - everyone who lives here knows that. The continued squeezing of migrants into our once-great city has stretched services and infrastructure to its limit and it gets really hard to imagine that things will get better. I don't blame the migrants - I blame the politicians (state and federal) for being complicit with one of the highest migration rates in the world while failing to cater for said migrants with more infrastructure.

The fact that Weatherill opted to borrow and build might well make Adelaide a more attractive destination for investment and inter-state migrants in the future.

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