Best wooden trestle bridges

 
  bronwyn Train Controller

Location: from Rocky to pommy land! and now I am back in the nations capital serving the public
i must remember to have a look in my own archive collection from time to time. Just found this one of Maroochy River drop bridge while looking for some postcards of something totally unrelated. 
[img]http://i786.photobucket.com/albums/yy142/moocowme/th_drop_bridge.jpg[/img]

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  adrian_mole Beginner

Around Tenterfield, http://www.panoramio.com/user/1065106/tags/New%20England http://www.panoramio.com/user/3420218/tags/New%20England 5 main constructs plus lots of little ones Also quite a few north of Wallangarra http://www.panoramio.com/user/1065106/tags/Wyberba Richmond Vale Rail Looks like the Bruthen bridge with a gap at the end to prevent access No where's that picture set
"marhleet"



Bredbo River
just a sec ...

Ingelara Creek
http://www.panoramio.com/photo/73744896 - 3D build pic, nicely straight
 


http://www.panoramio.com/photo/73690238 - stitched and fisheye


Colyers Creek @ Colinton
http://www.panoramio.com/photo/73691500


Chakola looking from the down end, at the grade descending from Queanbeyan towards Cooma
http://www.panoramio.com/photo/73665903




  drwaddles In need of a breath mint

Location: Newcastle
^ Gorgeous.
  lunchbox Locomotive Driver

Thanks to all for the great pix.  The Maroochy lifter is a doozy!
My favourite trestle was at Maydena in the hills west of Hobart.  I stumbled upon it one day in the sixties.  Next time I visited the site it had been burned to the ground by bushfires.
  Kafoopsy Chief Commissioner

Location: Perth, WA
Just bringing up this old thread to post some recent photos.

First, the rail and road bridges at Gundagai.  First time I had seen them, they are magnificent.  Road bridge is on the verge of collapse, but the rail bridge still looks in good condition.



NSW was the Queen of truss bridges.  There are not many rail trusss bridges left, but there are many road bridges such as this one.


However, New Zealand was the King and has Australia easily beaten for timber truss bridges.  But NSW wins for preservation with many road truss bridges actively restored and still in use. NZ ones are going fast with a very few preserved, but not restored or in use.
Top photo: Kurow Bridge (being replaced as I type this)
Bottom Photo: Ross Rail Bridge. Last used in 1980, a hand rail has been installed so you can walk over it but it is in poor condition and looks like it might fall at any moment!



Check out this one from the National Library of New Zealand!
[url=https://natlib.govt.nz/records/23090607?search[atl_free_download]=true&search[page]=3&search[path]=items&search[text]=bridge]https://natlib.govt.nz/records/23090607?search[atl_free_download]=true&search[page]=3&search[path]=items&search[text]=bridge[/url]

Now for a question.  Is the Chakola Bridge south of Canberra easily accessible? Do you require permission from a landowner?


  Kafoopsy Chief Commissioner

Location: Perth, WA
Were you able to walk down that little viewing area on the road bridge in 2009? It was closed when I was there a few months ago. That bridge is one that I would be hesitant to walk over if it was allowed.

Also, I notice that the old powerpoles along the side of the bridge have been removed. (or else they have fallen down!)
  Bogong Chief Commissioner

Location: Essendon Aerodrome circa 1980
I keep going back to the wonderful Rubicon Aqueducts walk. Four trestles bridges, great scenery and intact infrastructure such as a sawmill and a long tramway.

My photos of the smallest and largest trestle bridges and a link to walking notes for the Rubicon area.

  Kafoopsy Chief Commissioner

Location: Perth, WA
Ah, Beech Creek Trestle. That's the one I've been reading about that was rebuilt after the bushfire.  Pity about the handrails.
  wurx Lithgovian Ambassador-at-Large

Location: The mystical lost principality of Daptovia
Were you able to walk down that little viewing area on the road bridge in 2009? It was closed when I was there a few months ago. That bridge is one that I would be hesitant to walk over if it was allowed.

Also, I notice that the old powerpoles along the side of the bridge have been removed. (or else they have fallen down!)
Kafoopsy

Yes, I did walk to the viewing area, and no, I'd pass walking on it too; I had an almost accident on the Manilla trestle a couple of years ago which did much to increase caution at the expense of exploration Sad A rotten sleeper snapped under me; I was lucky to get away with a scraped shin. Scared the bejeezus out of me at the time......
  locojoe67 Assistant Commissioner

Location: Gen X purgatory/urban Joh-land
Is the Chakola Bridge south of Canberra easily accessible? Do you require permission from a landowner?


1. Yes
2. Probably...?

As the bridge appeared in 2009, viewed from a distance:
https://24.media.tumblr.com/2841ab104195ec37b3e23bfaa7f85c6c/tumblr_mylgfyHKoQ1to7jopo6_1280.jpg



http://coomamonarorailway.tumblr.com/
  GrahamH Chief Commissioner

Location: At a terminal on the www.
I keep going back to the wonderful Rubicon Aqueducts walk. Four trestles bridges, great scenery and intact infrastructure such as a sawmill and a long tramway.

My photos of the smallest and largest trestle bridges and a link to walking notes for the Rubicon area.

Bogong

Royston power station?
  Bogong Chief Commissioner

Location: Essendon Aerodrome circa 1980
Royston power station?
GrahamH

Yep Royston Power Station, the top end of the penstock feeding it is still a wood stave pipeline dating from the 1920's

This pic is taken a few hundred metres to the north. It isn't a trestle bridge, but it shows an old mini sawmill and is evocative of the centre section of the Rubicon Aqueduct. It has a very pleasant vibe. Use my track notes and take a visit. Smile

  trestle_nutter Train Controller

Location: Yarra Valley
the Malcolm Moore loco that was in the shed at Rubicon powerstation is now at Alex. Timber Tramway museum
  Bullucked Assistant Commissioner

Yep Royston Power Station, the top end of the penstock feeding it is still a wood stave pipeline dating from the 1920's

This pic is taken a few hundred metres to the north. It isn't a trestle bridge, but it shows an old mini sawmill and is evocative of the centre section of the Rubicon Aqueduct. It has a very pleasant vibe. Use my track notes and take a visit. Smile

Bogong

Thanks for the photo's and the info as this is a very interesting and very reachable area from Melbourne. Must be time for a visit as haven't had a look in over 10 years. (Just wish I'd taken photo's when I first went exploring 24 years ago. I've got the vaguest feeling they'd - the SEC - gone over to quad bikes back then)
Question; Is the cable hauled incline still used for inspection of the tailrace headed towards Tin Hut?
  Bogong Chief Commissioner

Location: Essendon Aerodrome circa 1980
I think they stopped using both the tramway and The Haulage just before the turn of the century, both were certainly used well into the 1990's.

The Rubicon aqueduct has four trestle bridges. two big and high ones upstream of Royston Power station (beech Creek and Lubra Creek), the small one next to Royston power station and a long lowish one about 1 km to the north.

For those who aren't familiar with the area, this is The Haulage, just a straight single track, cable hauled incline, not even a semi funicular. The Haulage looks like this from the bottom, Rubicon (Not Royston) power station is in the foreground.

There used to be a village at the top of The Haulage with about a dozen houses and kids used to use this car to get down to the school bus stop in the valley!
  TomBTR Chief Train Controller

Location: near Sydney
Although not strictly rail, this talk might appeal to some of the timber bridge enthusiast readers of this thread.

A Technical Presentation by Engineering Heritage Committee, Engineers Australia Sydney Division.

Timber Truss Bridges – Precious or Past it?

Speaker:

Amie Nicholas BE, Grad Dip (PM), M.E. (Structural), M.Herit.Cons., MIEAust, CPEng, NPER


Timber bridges in New South Wales were once the indispensable technology of inland expansion. Timber truss bridges in particular are important functional elements of the built environments and scenery of local communities. They form a tangible record of a segment of the State’s engineering history and the evolution of its road and transport system. However, it is in the nature of infrastructure to become obsolete, and many of these bridges are now ‘pinch-points’ and ‘bottle-necks’, embarrassments to a burgeoning national road transport system. Less than 60 bridges remain today.

Although not original either in fabric or in design details, a sympathetically strengthened timber truss bridge is able to showcase the capabilities of the unique NSW hardwoods, as well as the abilities of the engineers of yesteryear who were able to harness this natural resource when it was plentiful for the good of the rapidly expanding community of New South Wales. This talk will look at the bridges, the original designers, and engineering guidelines for conservation.

http://www.engineersaustralia.org.au/events/timber-truss-bridges-precious-or-past-it
  Kafoopsy Chief Commissioner

Location: Perth, WA
If I was in Sydney, I would be there with bells on.  That would be a very interesting presentation, especially as I have just spent a lot of time photographing nearly all of the remaining timber truss bridges in NSW.  Many of them have already been fully reconstructed using a lot of hidden steel to strengthen them while retaining most of the original look.  The top photo is Tharwa Bridge in Canberra which has been reconstructed.  The bottom photo is Foxlow Bridge near Captains Flat, which has hardly been touched since it was built.

  wurx Lithgovian Ambassador-at-Large

Location: The mystical lost principality of Daptovia
Stony Creek bridge at Nowa Nowa, between Bairnsdale and Orbost in eastern Vic:

[bigimg]http://i1129.photobucket.com/albums/m518/Lad_Porter/LakesEntranceAugust2009011-1.jpg[/bigimg]


[bigimg]http://i1129.photobucket.com/albums/m518/Lad_Porter/LakesEntranceAugust2009019.jpg[/bigimg]
Lad_Porter

My understanding is that the Stoney Creek Viaduct is located nearest to - as opposed to at - the site of Colquhoun station, rather than Nowa Nowa just over 4km west, which has its own nearby Boggy River trestle.

Here are some more recent pix of it (late May this year), with some appropriately ghostly weather for enhancement.

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