Favourite Aussie car -

 
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
I was shocked to find out that early Holdens/Fords didn't even have heaters (they were an option). We've come a long way since then haven't we.
don_dunstan

A very basic AM radio was also an option. So were seat belts and windscreen washers.
Indeed, we have come a long way.

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  Camster Chief Commissioner

Location: Geelong
A very basic AM radio was also an option. So were seat belts and windscreen washers.
Indeed, we have come a long way.
Valvegear

My father told me Holden used to be very stingy compared to Japanese car companies, and I tend to agree when I think about my VC commodore.
  don_dunstan Minister for Railways

Location: Adelaide proud
My father told me Holden used to be very stingy compared to Japanese car companies, and I tend to agree when I think about my VC commodore.
Camster

The argument runs that tariffs made Ford and Holden very lazy and that Aussie cars were rubbish until tariffs started being cut in the 70's.  I had a Renault 16 as my first car and for something that was made in 1973 the standard of appointment and interior finish was really luxurious when you compared it to the equivalent Escort, Gemini or Torana.

They started to really lift their game in the late 1980's in particular and if you go through to present day the Commodore and Falcon compare very favourably with anything you might bring in from overseas, particularly with the finish of the interior etc which was something they always fell down on.  It's a shame there won't be any more.
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
The argument runs that tariffs made Ford and Holden very lazy and that Aussie cars were rubbish until tariffs started being cut in the 70's.  I had a Renault 16 as my first car and for something that was made in 1973 the standard of appointment and interior finish was really luxurious when you compared it to the equivalent Escort, Gemini or Torana.

They started to really lift their game in the late 1980's in particular and if you go through to present day the Commodore and Falcon compare very favourably with anything you might bring in from overseas, particularly with the finish of the interior etc which was something they always fell down on.  It's a shame there won't be any more.
"don_dunstan"

One thing very often forgotten is back in the 70's when we had import tariffs is that there was also restrictions on the number of models that makers could import, so we never saw the basic models of most imports sold here. Yet we still seem to compare the local Belmont model to the 'premier' model imports.
Incidentally, my boss has a 911 porsche ..... it didn't even come with air conditioning!
  don_dunstan Minister for Railways

Location: Adelaide proud
One thing very often forgotten is back in the 70's when we had import tariffs is that there was also restrictions on the number of models that makers could import, so we never saw the basic models of most imports sold here. Yet we still seem to compare the local Belmont model to the 'premier' model imports.
Incidentally, my boss has a 911 porsche ..... it didn't even come with air conditioning!
Pressman

My Renault 16 was actually shipped here in knock-down format and assembled at a factory in West Heidelberg so I'm not sure if you would count that as Aussie or not?

Mine was the TS which was the luxury/rally package with a 4-speed gearbox and fairly sumptuous interior for 1973; air-con and power windows were options. Compared to the other cars of the day it was pretty gutsy and solid for a front wheel drive 1.8; I used to drive interstate quite a lot and for an older car it was really good on the highway (it was already 17 years old when I bought it). I'm not sure you could say the same about equivalents like the Torana or Escort? A friend of mine had a Gemini from the same period and despite it being the SL (or whatever the upmarket one was back then) it wasn't nearly as nice as my 16TS.

I sold my Renault in the mid-1990's to a mechanic who wanted it for his daughter to drive around in so there's a good chance its probably still chugging around in South Australia somewhere - they were already somewhat of a collector's thing back then.

I'm not sure how many Holden/Ford smaller cars from that era was knock-down rebuilds or were actually built here? I know that it was quite common by the time you get to the 1980's with models like Laser and Telstar.
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
If you think that modernish cars were pretty spartan have a look at the inside of a FJ or FX Holden then, these cars were built to last and had very few extra's on them. My cousin had a FJ holden years back and while not the fastest or best looking car on the road they were reliable and easy to fix when something did go wrong with them. No computer controlled smeg back then though!
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
Exactly! When I lifted the bonnet of the old FE or HD, there was an engine. I lift the bonnet of my current steed ( Lancer) and it's a plumber's and electrician's nightmare. I thought nothing of lifting those Holden engines out, working on them, and dropping them back in again. I wouldn't know where to start now.
  Graham4405 Minister for Railways

Location: Dalby Qld
Exactly! When I lifted the bonnet of the old FE or HD, there was an engine. I lift the bonnet of my current steed ( Lancer) and it's a plumber's and electrician's nightmare. I thought nothing of lifting those Holden engines out, working on them, and dropping them back in again. I wouldn't know where to start now.
Valvegear

Yep, I always worked on my own car from when I first owned a car (1969) until about the mid '90s when they started to have on board computers etc. Not much I can do now.

I remember seeing a stand up comedy piece on TV some years back. I forget who the comedian was, but it went something like: I remember when I had an FJ Holden, if it didn't start I could just take the spark plug from my mower, put it in the car and away we went. Now all I can do is lift the bonnet and think: "Yep, engine's still there..." Laughing
  Z1NorthernProgress2110 Chief Commissioner

Location: Burnie, Tasmania
I have a 1979 VB SL/E Commodore, one of a few built with factory 308/M21 4 speed manual. Its a cranky thing but at least its easy to work on. Headlight washers/wipers work too!

Its when Holden turned from the traditional USA style cars to the euro style cars. Sure, the first of the Commodore's is an adaption of an Opel Senator front onto an Opel Rekord A pillers back sedan and later wagon body. Australia was well down this path but Opel released there Opel Commodore in 1977, one year before Holden released there's.

My SL/E, a firm favorite of mine. Now becoming rare.
  TheBlacksmith Chief Commissioner

Location: Ankh Morpork
Exactly! When I lifted the bonnet of the old FE or HD, there was an engine. I lift the bonnet of my current steed ( Lancer) and it's a plumber's and electrician's nightmare. I thought nothing of lifting those Holden engines out, working on them, and dropping them back in again. I wouldn't know where to start now.
Valvegear

I had an EJ, in their case you just lifted the motor out and dropped it period. There was little point in putting it back. POS. Damn thing went through engines faster than I could get them.
  waxyzebu Locomotive Driver

I'm not sure how many Holden/Ford smaller cars from that era was knock-down rebuilds or were actually built here? I know that it was quite common by the time you get to the 1980's with models like Laser and Telstar.
don_dunstan


Most production of Fords like the Escort and Cortina was fully local, albeit to modified UK/German designs.

Earlier on, BLMC/Leyland Australia was also making many of its small/medium cars from scratch at Victoria Park, Sydney, like the Mini, 1100/1300, 1500/Nomad, 1800/X6, Marina etc, until the company went down the tube and the plant closed in October 1974. Where a useful comparison could be made, BLMC products tended to be slightly ahead of Ford/GM in the tech spec stakes.

British Leyland left an interesting legacy. Its designs popped up in unexpected places. While the company was busy killing itself, derivatives of its venerable Austin engines were being churned out in large numbers by Nissan-Datsun. From the mid 70s until the late 2000s the highly regarded Saab 4 cylinder donks were derived from the Triumph Slant 4 engine - the design was only replaced by a GM product shortly before Detroit pulled the plug on Saab's life support and sold out to Chinese investors... and let's not forget the BL factory antics! The lesson we can learn is if you're going to amalgamate almost an entire country's motor industry into one company, make sure duplication and competition from within is eliminated; share resources and platforms... do not make similar products under a hundred different brand names in competing factories trying to reinvent the wheel in isolation from each other and expect to turn a profit. Profit wasn't something BL was ever good at generating.



One thing very often forgotten is back in the 70's when we had import tariffs is that there was also restrictions on the number of models that makers could import, so we never saw the basic models of most imports sold here. Yet we still seem to compare the local Belmont model to the 'premier' model imports.

Yes, that's not fair, is it?

The big Aussie cars have copped a bad wrap, which is unfair especially nowadays because I think the Falcodores are genuinely decent cars that do their job well and still do things their Japanese and European competitors won't without having to make price/comfort/space compromises. If I were in the market for a new car, I'd buy one.

We might bag the hell out of Holden and Ford now but we will miss them once they are gone.
  Graham4405 Minister for Railways

Location: Dalby Qld
We might bag the hell out of Holden and Ford now but we will miss them once they are gone.
waxyzebu

Ford seem to have already (almost) forgotten about the Falcon range. They don't seem to be pushing it at all and there hasn't been a major model change for some years. I have owned Falcons (and other Fords) for most of my driving life, but currently own a Subaru. The only thing I miss is the room in the back seat on the rare occasions that I have to put 3 people in there!
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat RFR Line
My old man had a Chrysler Charger, too thirsty for his liking but by far the coolest car on the street. Apparently they fetch in the realm of $20,000-$30,000 now-days because the kiddies love them... who'd have thunk!
don_dunstan

As a Chrysler Australia fan for over 40 years...a reasonably mediocre Valiant Charger will bring upwards of 15K.
A 1971 E38 Bathurst Valiant Charger in good order, original engine, good paint and stripes etc is an open cheque...usually upwards of 100K.

For my contribution, a Hemi..Valiant Pacer hardtop, part US Dodge Dart, part 1970 Valiant but still built in Adelaide is one of the best looking Aussie cars.

The fact that I own one shows a degree of bias on my part...Wink

Mike.

http://www.google.com.au/imgres?imgurl=http%3A%2F%2Fgomotors.net%2Fphotos%2Fd8%2F91%2Fchrysler-valiant-vg-coupe-10-image-size-2816-x-2112-px-imagejpeg_694d2.jpg%253Fi&imgrefurl=http%3A%2F%2Fgomotors.net%2FChrysler%2FChrysler-Valiant-VG-Coupe%2Fphotos.html&h=2112&w=2816&tbnid=oZZigKEc-9WY3M%3A&zoom=1&docid=g7e2ys9_CvTx9M&hl=en&ei=_z-NU7CXN9GykgXT64GYDw&tbm=isch&ved=0CDUQMygLMAs&iact=rc&uact=3&dur=334&page=1&start=0&ndsp=16
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
An Aussie made car OS.

My 2011 Toyota Aurion Grande (still own it 85,000km)

- Pale blue on outside is nice with tinted windows, but I must admit the interior beige is a bit bland. Black would have been nice and the newer ones have this
- The skin is an Aussie design specifically targeting the Commodore and Falcon
- Built on a Camry plan, so its reliable
- 3.5L V6 290HP (middle east they have more HP than Oz due to higher grade fuel), 6speed box is amazing and makes this bird fly and keep up/pass the american crap without trying to deafen you.
- Even pulling from 140 to 180km/hr its still pulling. I've had hard lined European car owners go wow. From 180 to 200 it starts to slow down especially after 190 when it goes to 6th gear (with 4 guys inside). Not gone past 200km/hr, but it was still smooth at 200
- 85,000km of faultless km. Only early tyre replacement.
- Toyota Dubai basically pi$$es on most other manufactures as they can actually service a car in 1-2hr and do it right. Ford, Chev, Nissan etc is 2-3 days

One down side, the tyres that came with it didn't age well on the high speed ho Dubai roads. they were noisy early. Fairly common for people like me who mostly use it for commuting to Abu Dhabi where you cruise on a straight line for 100km at 140km/hr in 50deg heat. The 2nd batch of tyres, Yoko's which are different to the supplied supplier? now closing in on same km's are much better with still low noise levels, I will know for sure after summer. My wifes Pajero tyres of similar age have gone very nosiy lately so maybe mine will be ok.

(Oz made) Toyota Taxi Camry's of same year model as my Aurion do 750,000 to 1,000,000 no issue on petrol. I was in one with 850,000km on clock and the first time it felt well used was at a speed bump with a bit more clunk than my car.

Regards
Shane
  Aaron Minister for Railways

Location: University of Adelaide SA
As a Chrysler Australia fan for over 40 years...a reasonably mediocre Valiant Charger will bring upwards of 15K.
A 1971 E38 Bathurst Valiant Charger in good order, original engine, good paint and stripes etc is an open cheque...usually upwards of 100K.

For my contribution, a Hemi..Valiant Pacer hardtop, part US Dodge Dart, part 1970 Valiant but still built in Adelaide is one of the best looking Aussie cars.

The fact that I own one shows a degree of bias on my part...Wink

Mike.
"The Vinelander"
I work with a young girl that owns one, currently in much disassembled state on account of it being fully re sprayed in and out. She was recently offered $13k for the rolling chassis. Fully painted up and new leather interior, she's going to be worth a fortune.

She even has two plants for it, the 245 and 318, the 245 was in it, but she's going to have the 318 fitted instead.
  Carnot Chief Commissioner

Most production of Fords like the Escort and Cortina was fully local, albeit to modified UK/German designs.

The big Aussie cars have copped a bad wrap, which is unfair especially nowadays because I think the Falcodores are genuinely decent cars that do their job well and still do things their Japanese and European competitors won't without having to make price/comfort/space compromises. If I were in the market for a new car, I'd buy one.

We might bag the hell out of Holden and Ford now but we will miss them once they are gone.
waxyzebu

Unfortunately a common mistake made by Aussie car makers in the 1970s was to fit ridiculously heavy inline-6 motors into cars that were only meant to take 4 cylinder engines.

Such lead-tipped arrows included:
Holden Torana (was a Vauxhall Viva/Opel Kadett).  Later LH model was really a very different car to the European cars.
Ford Cortina - let's cut a big hole in the firewall and completely compromise structural integrity.
Chrysler Centura (was a Chrysler/Simca 180) - take 1 lightweight French sedan and install powerful 4 litre Hemi 6.....
Leyland Marina - it was painfully mediocre to begin with.  The only remedy to its deadly handling was bags of cement in the boot.

It was as if they had a whole lot of surplus engines hanging around that needed using up!

Second-hand Falcodores (especially wagons) are a great option for families on a budget who want a decent sized car.  The supply of these will dry up soon.  Which is a shame IMO.
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat RFR Line
I was shocked to find out that early Holdens/Fords didn't even have heaters (they were an option). We've come a long way since then haven't we.
don_dunstan

That's not entirely correct...

From 1971 onwards all cars had to have a fan boosted heater/demister fitted as standard equipment. This was a safety issue to try to stop people driving around in cars in cold weather with all the windows fogged up.

Before 1970, higher spec local cars such as Holden's Premier, Ford's Fairmont and Chrysler's Valiant Regal, and their more expensive equivalents of the then 'Big Three' had fan boosted heater demisters, carpets, automatic transmissions and often bucket seats all as standard equipment.

Mike.
  waxyzebu Locomotive Driver

Unfortunately a common mistake made by Aussie car makers in the 1970s was to fit ridiculously heavy inline-6 motors into cars that were only meant to take 4 cylinder engines.

Such lead-tipped arrows included:
Holden Torana (was a Vauxhall Viva/Opel Kadett). Later LH model was really a very different car to the European cars.
Ford Cortina - let's cut a big hole in the firewall and completely compromise structural integrity.
Chrysler Centura (was a Chrysler/Simca 180) - take 1 lightweight French sedan and install powerful 4 litre Hemi 6.....
Leyland Marina - it was painfully mediocre to begin with. The only remedy to its deadly handling was bags of cement in the boot.

It was as if they had a whole lot of surplus engines hanging around that needed using up!

Second-hand Falcodores (especially wagons) are a great option for families on a budget who want a decent sized car. The supply of these will dry up soon. Which is a shame IMO.
Carnot


The Marina was an early 70s austerity car that was never going to amount to anything; it took a step backwards from its Issigonis derived predecessors. Their strong point was the 1750/2600 E series OHC engines that Australian examples featured, which were good performers as long as the lack of water jackets between cylinders didn't matter. The Marina was designed by Roy Haynes, who also designed the Cortina Mk II. He must have been having a bad week when he came up with the Marina.

The 2 litre Pinto engined Cortina had decent performance (the Escort with the same engine absolutely flew). Dropping the big 200/250 in was really unncessary, but I guess they thought they had to cater for all tastes - not sure which company dropped a 6 into a 4 cylinder European car first.

There was also an Austin 1800 prototype fitted with a Rover 3.5 litre V8 made at Victoria Park around 1970, perhaps the only Australian front wheel drive V8 ever made.

I think the loss of the Failcon and Dunnydoor is a disaster. Judging by the number of AU Falcons and VT Commodores still on the road now, the last of the 2016/17 Falcodores will be chugging around in an increasingly sorry state by the early 2030s, so I guess they'll see many of us out. Just quietly, I see far more AU Falcons on the road now than VT Commodores. The AU might have been pretty ghastly looking but seems to have proven itself in the mechanical reliability/durability department.
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
Unfortunately a common mistake made by Aussie car makers in the 1970s was to fit ridiculously heavy inline-6 motors into cars that were only meant to take 4 cylinder engines.
"Carnot"

More so the Australian market had a love for those inline 6's, just as the USA had a love for their V8's*
Holden did offer 4 cylinder version of the early Commodore and LH Torana, Both one of the few cars you could get with either 4, 6 or a V8!
The 4 cylinder Commodore was a total flop, grossly underpowered, one of the few cases of a 4 in a car designed for a 6

* At one time in the USA you could buy a GMC Suburban with a supercharged 454 V8 off the showroom floor!
  don_dunstan Minister for Railways

Location: Adelaide proud
I work with a young girl that owns one, currently in much disassembled state on account of it being fully re sprayed in and out. She was recently offered $13k for the rolling chassis. Fully painted up and new leather interior, she's going to be worth a fortune.

She even has two plants for it, the 245 and 318, the 245 was in it, but she's going to have the 318 fitted instead.
Aaron

At least she's throwing money at a car that will actually be worth something, usually you see people doing up cars where the finished value is nothing like what they've spent.

What a cool young lady she must be to be driving around in a hot Charger !

A close friend of mine has been looking to buy a Valiant from the mid-seventies as he had one for many years before someone crashed into him and wrote it off - we were shocked to see the prices of Aussie Chrysler cars, they're extortionate.  A basic Valiant in good condition is $10,000+ but a Charger in good order is at least double that.
  don_dunstan Minister for Railways

Location: Adelaide proud
British Leyland left an interesting legacy.
waxyzebu

I worked with a shearer from Mildura once who drove his P76 everywhere - all over Australia - he really loved that car and kept it in top condition.  It had half a million on the clock (this was in the 1990's) and he swore by its reliability and durability - air conditioning, power steering.  I had a drive of it once and it did sit very well on the road; he was the brunt of jokes from the other shearers though.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
Unfortunately a common mistake made by Aussie car makers in the 1970s was to fit ridiculously heavy inline-6 motors into cars that were only meant to take 4 cylinder engines.

Such lead-tipped arrows included:
Holden Torana (was a Vauxhall Viva/Opel Kadett). Later LH model was really a very different car to the European cars.
Ford Cortina - let's cut a big hole in the firewall and completely compromise structural integrity.
Chrysler Centura (was a Chrysler/Simca 180) - take 1 lightweight French sedan and install powerful 4 litre Hemi 6.....
Leyland Marina - it was painfully mediocre to begin with. The only remedy to its deadly handling was bags of cement in the boot.

It was as if they had a whole lot of surplus engines hanging around that needed using up!

Second-hand Falcodores (especially wagons) are a great option for families on a budget who want a decent sized car. The supply of these will dry up soon. Which is a shame IMO.
Carnot

My first car was the 1974 3 spd auto Marina 6cyl, 2.6L Super coupe in Nutmeg brown, bought in 1987. I kept it for 4-5 years, taught me alot about cars. Bought it with ACT plates in Syd, abandoned do up project. Finally sold it a year after I moved to Tassie to some Leyland nut who just about wet himself when he saw that not only was it a 6 (rare in Tas), I had replaced the heavy 3 speed auto with a 4 speed manual and installed the dual carb from the Kimberly. 10-20% more HP easy, or less fuel. With the twin carb I picked up 50-80km to the tank.

They go very well in a straight line, and all too often I was blowing away hoons in the usual Torana's/commodores etc. To make it turn dad and I installed front and rear sway bars with gas shocks and changed the oil in the front dampers to a heavier oil. It had a slightly wider set of mags than standard rims. maybe 20-30mm wider tyres.

Agree on the Falcons. Grossly under valued by the Aussie market now days. My wife's last model before heading OS was a 2003 BA Fairmont bought in 2006 with 75,000km on the clock. Cost $15k from dealer. Meanwhile a Mazada 3 of similar vintage costs $5k more and you have half the car. Fuel economy of the local big cars is in line with anything from Europe. People say they don't have this or that compared to an Audi or what ever. But the Audi they are looking at usually is a A3 or A4, 2/3 the size and cost twice the price. A direct competitor for the Falcon is almost the A6/A8. Now try and pick one of those up for $50k. Some commodores come with +500Hp engines plus all the blue tooth crap you can think of. Try and buy something with 4 doors, large car with +500HP from Europe for under a $80k, good luck getting it for $150k.

The public have lost interest in the Commodore/Falcon sized cars. Commodore is popular, here and and in middle east. But the bail out of GM prohibits its continued production. Unfortunately we won't know what we have really lost until its gone and its unfortunate Toyota on its own is not viable, but otherwise it is successful.


I do laugh now at people who buy these 70/80's Aussie cars to "do up". For the money a friend spent on rebuilding a 88 Holden ute and $15,000 crate engine, I bought a brand knew Aurion with similar HP, can actually turn, has AC and comes with in built satnav, uses have the fuel, only needs servicing, not maintaining and the police leave me alone. His car was "so great" read unreliable he off-loaded for a massive loss within 6mths of getting it on the road and in that 6mths may have not even driven it 2000km and only then his brother bought it for the engine and struggled to off load the body after. ie paid same price for car as originally paid for engine. 3 years of wasted shed time for nothing.

There is no money in doing up cars anymore. Most of the genuine classic owners won't touch a modified car.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
I worked with a shearer from Mildura once who drove his P76 everywhere - all over Australia - he really loved that car and kept it in top condition. It had half a million on the clock (this was in the 1990's) and he swore by its reliability and durability - air conditioning, power steering. I had a drive of it once and it did sit very well on the road; he was the brunt of jokes from the other shearers though.
don_dunstan

There is always a die hard. In 1988 I met a guy at Gosford Wreckers pulling parts out of the latest dumped Marina (monthly visit to wreckers to get the best parts was a must if you owned one). He said his wife had I think a black coupe P76 V8 and no way no how was anyone ever taking that off her.

The P76 with the light weight alloy V8 was a beast. The boot took a 44 gallon drum, a fairly low wide car with alloy block so it handled well and the small V8 gave plenty of grunt and it kept up with most of the other large local stuff.

There were however a QA lemon for Leyaland and like the Marina. As long as you were prepared to put some effort in maintenance, they kept running.
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
He said his wife had I think a black coupe P76 V8 and no way no how was anyone ever taking that off her.
"RTT_Rules"


The P76 Coupe was never released for public sale, only 50 were made and 47 of those where scrapped! s I doubt strongly that guy had one at all.
The only street registered P76 Coupe is in the National Motor Museem at Birdwood SA
  waxyzebu Locomotive Driver

Agree on the Falcons. Grossly under valued by the Aussie market now days. My wife's last model before heading OS was a 2003 BA Fairmont bought in 2006 with 75,000km on the clock. Cost $15k from dealer. Meanwhile a Mazada 3 of similar vintage costs $5k more and you have half the car. Fuel economy of the local big cars is in line with anything from Europe. People say they don't have this or that compared to an Audi or what ever. But the Audi they are looking at usually is a A3 or A4, 2/3 the size and cost twice the price. A direct competitor for the Falcon is almost the A6/A8. Now try and pick one of those up for $50k. Some commodores come with +500Hp engines plus all the blue tooth crap you can think of. Try and buy something with 4 doors, large car with +500HP from Europe for under a $80k, good luck getting it for $150k.

The public have lost interest in the Commodore/Falcon sized cars. Commodore is popular, here and and in middle east. But the bail out of GM prohibits its continued production. Unfortunately we won't know what we have really lost until its gone and its unfortunate Toyota on its own is not viable, but otherwise it is successful.
RTT_Rules

When it comes to used cars, spending money to supposedly save money over the medium term can be a marginal exercise.

I think a lot of people who just want a cheap runabout as a second car for a couple of years or while they save for a brand new car might be overlooking certain aspects of the equation when they choose used Japanese cars that hold their value very well over used Falcodores that sell for next to nothing but still have many years left in them, provided they are maintained properly.

The fact is you can get a 10 year old Falcodore at half the price of a 10 year old Corolla or Mazda 3 - that could mean about $2,000-4,000 difference. To put it a different way, you can get a 2004 Falcodore for the price of a 1998/99 Corolla. The Falcodore will use more fuel than the Corolla/Mazda 3, especially around town and might not be quite as reliable, but it would still be cheaper overall unless you intended to keep the car for a long time... not to mention more comfortable and better to drive. If you can snag a Falcodore on LPG, which isn't hard, you're laughing.


There is no money in doing up cars anymore. Most of the genuine classic owners won't touch a modified car.

Most modified cars I've looked at/bought have had dodgy work done on them by people who should never have been frigging around with cars in the first place but expect to make a mint when they sell. Idiots...

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