'gunzel' is it degrogetory?

 
  gebias Beginner

From people with in the industry, when they use the term 'gunzel' is it degrogetory?

can people in the industry talk to how they feel about rail fans or 'gunzel's"

i mean for you it is just a job?

if you work in the industry can you be referred to as a 'gunzel'?

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  dthead Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
I see you saw the old thread from 6 years ago:  https://www.railpage.com.au/f-t11351467.htm


Gunzel is more for the railfan, and not the railway worker. Though if the railway worker like trains as a hobbu, yes they may be considered a Gunzel.  And yes it is often derogatory as many are , well, badly behaved. Yet many are quite good and responsible.

Regards,
David Head
  Graham4405 The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Dalby Qld
Did you mean derogatory?
  gebias Beginner

'degrogetory'
are you telling me that this is not a word? it appears my spell check can't actually spell.

  Rodo Chief Commissioner

Location: Southern Riverina
Gunzels are only degrogetory, when keeping off the piss.
  TheBlacksmith Chief Commissioner

Location: Ankh Morpork
Like everything, it depends on how the term is used. The US has 'foamers', which sounds to me even less appealing, while the UK has 'anoraks', which sounds to me like a flasher dressed for wet weather.

Of all of them, Gunzel is probably less offensive.

And while we are on it, I dislike the use of the term Mexicans for Victorians.
  duttonbay Minister for Railways

The UK also has the term "gricer", which IIRC is used for people who enjoy travelling by train, with an aim to cover as much of the network as possible. I believe the term comes from the idea that we ("gricer") grace the train with our presence.

A google search for the word "degrogetory" brings up this thread, but no references to any dictionary web site. It doesn't appear in chambers or dictionary.com, the two dictionary sites I use most often.  

I have issues with the term gunzel. It's been around a long, long time, and is I think uniquely Australian. I reckon it's a good word...
  bingley hall Minister for Railways

Location: Last train to Skaville
The UK also has the term "gricer", which IIRC is used for people who enjoy travelling by train, with an aim to cover as much of the network as possible. I believe the term comes from the idea that we ("gricer") grace the train with our presence.
duttonbay
Gricer is used in UK in the same manner as gunzel and more widely used than anoraks, though you have to be pretty hard core to earn the epithet of gricer.

It also a generational thing. In my spotting days the term 'anorak' was never heard of to describe a participant in the hobby, despite that fact that I often used to wear one.
  62440 Chief Commissioner

I like the word degrogetory for a rude remark made while drunk.
  Gwiwer Rt Hon Gentleman and Ghost of Oliver Bulleid

Location: Loitering in darkest Somewhere
Gunzel is considered mildly derogatory though is also used as a term recognising a level of interest or knowledge.  It can be both in the same sentence.  As an example if one is able to quote the time of the next three departures from Little Nuttingford the reply might be "You gunzel!".  

Those working in the rail industry might use the term to describe others (fellow employees or otherwise) and its use is the same; mildly derogatory but often with a hint of respect.

It is sometimes applied to those with advanced and specialised knowledge though usually in those instances it is out of respect.  I have heard the term "Senior gunzel" used to describe one or two who could, indeed, be said to have achived that state by dint of publications and general knowledge.

Other occasional variants are "Professional gunzel" (one who earns money from the hobby by some means - possibly as a commercial photographer / author or perhaps as a known enthusiast train driver), "Bunzel" for a bus enthusiast and "Tram gunzel" but never "Trunzel" for one who follows that mode avidly.  On a couple of occasions I have heard the term "aircraft gunzel" used to describe those with a keen interest in aviation or the observers just outside the fence at Tullamarine on the Sunbury road.

The UK term "gricer" (soft C) is broadly equivalent though is typically applied to an enthusiast who travels rather than a platform-ender.  "Basher" is used to describe a gricer who only or specifically travels behind particular locomotives / classes or who is intent on travelling all tracks in a given area / country (also "Track basher") while "Anorak" is definitely a derogatory term aimed at usually platform-end spotters whose chosen style of dress was often an anorak back in the 1970s. Attire has moved on but not so the language.  For road transport the term "Crank" is used to describe an enthusiast while "Cranking" is the act of travelling on a particular vehicle or route and equates to the Australian "Bunzel".  Thus you might crank the Routemaster bus on London route 15 then grice a spark from Charing Cross to Croydon before cranking the trams there.

Another term in the UK is "Bellowers" which refers to those who hang bodily, and dangerously, out of open windows often with arms outstretched to their farthest limits and who are either considered to "bellow" (shout) about the wonders of the locomotive they are riding behind or are listening to it "bellow" as it works hard.  Bellowers have a bad name among rail operators and other enthusiasts alike.  They first appeared on the scene in the 1970s as certain diesel classes were being withdrawn and became a significant nuisance in the 1980s.  They still exist but with the replacement of older rolling stock by air-conditioned fixed-window types, and better stewarding on charters, their numbers have dropped in recent times.

Australia uses the term "Caders" as an abbreviation of motorcaders for those who chase trains by car without riding them usually for photographic purposes.  In the UK such activities are less common but you might encounter "Chasers" if there is a steam train running.  One difference is that in the UK many rail lines do not have parallel roads making the chase harder.
  Braddo Deputy Commissioner

Location: Narre Warren
I personally don't find the term gunzel derogatory or offensive at all. I have no problem being called one and have even called myself one a number of times. I'm proud of my fascination with trains.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
Me personally no, not at all. But again like anything it can be used in such a way. Aussies like to give everything a nickname, usually shortening the full name and as many of us know in the industrial environment these are rarely your choice whether you like it or not and complaining gets you nowhere. As a redhead I have had my share over the years, you get used to it, like it or not (and there is no legal protection anyway), some names I don't mind at all.
  duttonbay Minister for Railways

It's a bit like the old fashioned term "bastard", which could be used as abuse or as mateship. An oft-quoted example was the day the captain of the English cricket team came to the Australian dressing room, and complained to the Aussie captain that he had been called a bastard by somebody. The Aussie skipper turned to his players and asked "all right, which one of your bastards call this bastard a bastard?"  It's all in the context.
  Donald Chief Commissioner

Location: Donald. Duck country.
I personally don't find the term gunzel derogatory or offensive at all. I have no problem being called one and have even called myself one a number of times. I'm proud of my fascination with trains.
Braddo
"I don't mind what you call me, so long as it's not late for dinner."
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Richmond Vic
I rather like the word "gunzel" because it provides a distinction between people who work on the trains in question, particularly heritage trains, and those who spend time watching and admiring them.  I don't care whether you're a worker or a gunzel; it doesn't matter, but it's an easy way of distinguishing.
Then, of course, there's the derivative - to "go out gunzelling". I think that's a wonderful piece of terminology.
  Graham4405 The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Dalby Qld
Then, of course, there's the derivative - to "go out gunzelling". I think that's a wonderful piece of terminology.
Valvegear
What's wrong with "going out train spotting", then? Wink
  Typhon Assistant Commissioner

Location: I'm that freight train tearing through the sky in the clouds.
Those working in the rail industry might use the term to describe others (fellow employees or otherwise) and its use is the same; mildly derogatory and often with a healthy dose of derision.
Gwiwer

Fixed that for you.
  duttonbay Minister for Railways

What's wrong with "going out train spotting", then? Wink
Graham4405
I find the term "train spotting" brings to mind images of spotty faced people standing around the ends of platforms, notebooks in hand, in the UK.  I would hate to be thought of that way...
  gebias Beginner

Thanks for all the responses, i have a much clearer picture now. i feel i would fit the criteria as a 'gunzel'

cheers

james
  TheBlacksmith Chief Commissioner

Location: Ankh Morpork
What's wrong with "going out train spotting", then? Wink
Graham4405
On the contrary, what is wrong with having a uniquely Australian term for the activity?
  Graham4405 The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Dalby Qld
I find the term "train spotting" brings to mind images of spotty faced people standing around the ends of platforms, notebooks in hand, in the UK.  I would hate to be thought of that way...
duttonbay
On the contrary, what is wrong with having a uniquely Australian term for the activity?
TheBlacksmith


Does it make a difference what you call it? Mr. Green
  TheBlacksmith Chief Commissioner

Location: Ankh Morpork
It does to me.
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Richmond Vic
Does it make a difference what you call it?
"Graham4405"
I does to me as well. I say gunzel instead of trainspotter; I say mate instead of buddy, I say crook instead of feeling poorly etc. Why? Because I like the Australian argot.
  Graham4405 The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Dalby Qld
It does to me.
TheBlacksmith
So when someone sees spotty faced people standing around the ends of platforms, notebooks in hand, they ask them "what do you call yourselves?". No they call you what they want to call you... Smile

What you call yourself is not the point.
  Gwiwer Rt Hon Gentleman and Ghost of Oliver Bulleid

Location: Loitering in darkest Somewhere
They can call me what they wish.  Some things I'll answer to but not others Wink

"what do you call yourselves?"


I'll call myself by my first name.  If they ask what I'm doing I'm pursuing a hobby.  They'll only get more by asking more questions.  After two most of them have given up and gone away.

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