Death row inmate Kelly Gissendaner’s last meal could be huge

 
  JoppaJunction Chief Train Controller

Location: Banned
THE only woman on death row in the US state of Georgia has revealed her last meal request ahead of her impending execution.
Kelly Renee Gissendaner, who was sentenced to death in 1998 for orchestrating the murder of her husband Doug, has asked for a long list of food including corn bread with a side of buttermilk.

She has also requested two Burger King Whoppers with cheese; two large orders of fries; cherry vanilla ice cream; popcorn; a salad with boiled eggs, tomatoes, bell peppers, onions, carrots, cheese and Newman’s Own buttermilk dressing; and lemonade, according to[color=#484f54][i] abc News 10[/i].[/color]

Final meal requests are not uncommon for death row inmates.

American terrorist, [color=#484f54]Timothy McVeigh, who detonated a truck-full of explosives in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people in 1995, ordered 2 pints of mint chip ice cream.[/color]

He was executed by lethal injection in 2001.


Gissendaner has asked for corn bread and a side of buttermilk.
Convicted murderer Victor Feguer, who was the last man to be executed in Iowa, requested a single olive with the pip still in it before he was executed in 1963.

However, elaborate last meals have come under the spotlight in the past.

Texas officials banned last meals in 2013 after convicted murderer Lawrence Russell Brewer requested two chicken fried steaks, a triple-meat bacon cheeseburger, fried okra, a pound of barbecue, three fajitas, a meat lover’s pizza, a pint of ice cream and a slab of peanut butter fudge with crushed peanuts.

Brewer reportedly refused to eat any of the food he had requested, leading to the ban.

Texas officials said at the time that death row inmates would get the same food as other inmates.
Gissendaner is scheduled to die by lethal injection Wednesday week, in what will be the state’s first execution of a woman in 70 years.

If the execution goes ahead as planned she will become the 35th Georgia inmate put to death by lethal injection.


The Georgian woman has also asked for a side of popcorn as well.


While her execution date has been set for February 25 at the Georgia Diagnostic and Classification Prison in Jackson, a last bid clemency hearing has been scheduled for February 24.

According to court documents, Gissendaner persuaded her then boyfriend Gregory Bruce Owen to kidnap her husband Douglas and kill him.

Gissendaner created the plot to collect on the couple’s life insurance policies, Associated Press reported and Owen testified against her in exchange for a life sentence.

It is not yet known whether her last meal request will be granted.

The last woman executed in Georgia was African American woman Lena Baker, who killed a white man who enslaved her.

The maid, who died in the electric chair in March 1945, was pardoned in 2005 after a jury found she acted in self-defence, broadcaster [color=#484f54]NPR reported.[/color]

Originally published as [color=#484f54][size=3][font=Guardian Sans', Tahoma, 'Trebuchet MS', TrebuchetMS, sans-serif]Death row woman’s disgusting last meal[/font][/size][/color]

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  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
I don't know how I could eat anything if in the same position.
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Richmond Vic
The execution ( read, "state-sanctioned murder" ),has been postponed because the lethal chemical solutions looked " a little cloudy." It would never do to use lethal chemicals that might be harmful, would it?
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
The execution ( read, "state-sanctioned murder" ),has been postponed because the lethal chemical solutions looked " a little cloudy." It would never do to use lethal chemicals that might be harmful, would it?
Valvegear
They are worried that it will be yet another screwed up execution and the person being a she will get more . Some of the last ones in the US they have had to close the curtains to the witnesses because the convicted dying moments were supposed too difficult to watch as the chemicals very painfully killed them. I mean what the witnesses for, they are there to witness someone being killed by order of the head of the government. If its too difficult to watch then perhaps they shouldn't be doing it?

I think the last guy the Warden actually called it off but the guy died of a heart attack some time later. What if he had lived? Surely this is their worst nightmare as there will be an outrage even by the midstream population. A person executed put to the table, due to poor choice of drugs or administration or what ever they some how survive but clearly were in extreme pain or potentially received mid/long-term harm in the process such as loss of mental function or physically disabled in some manner that prevents execution under their own existing laws, if not through simple public opinion.

One day with the person strapped down ready to go some common sense may prevail and the staff may simply refuse to undertake the execution.

As the State Governor is ultimately responsible for the death of the convict, should they convict the wrong person the Governor should be instantly charged with murder. Likewise should the death not go to plan which is supposed to quick and painless death, then those responsible including the Governor should be charged with torture.
  Serviceton_Kev Chief Commissioner

Location: Fecking here!
The execution ( read, "state-sanctioned murder" ),has been postponed because the lethal chemical solutions looked " a little cloudy." It would never do to use lethal chemicals that might be harmful, would it?
Valvegear
I know I can't stand it and how anyone in their right mind can use it but if they're worried about their lethal chemical solution, why don't they just do a Sid Vicious on her? It'd work just as good!
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
I know I can't stand it and how anyone in their right mind can use it but if they're worried about their lethal chemical solution, why don't they just do a Sid Vicious on her? It'd work just as good!
Serviceton_Kev
The USA still operates on the superstition that the convicted cannot see the faces of the executioner(s) incase they haunt them in the after life.
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Richmond Vic
The USA still operates on the superstition that the convicted cannot see the faces of the executioner(s) in case they haunt them in the after life.
"RTT_Rules"
And also on the superstition that the death penalty is a deterrent.
  Serviceton_Kev Chief Commissioner

Location: Fecking here!
The USA still operates on the superstition that the convicted cannot see the faces of the executioner(s) incase they haunt them in the after life.
RTT_Rules
Thing is what do the people who do the lethal injections wear so the people doesn't see them? What I meant by doing a Sid Vicious is giving them an OD on heroin. I don't understand how people can use it and inject themselves with it but at least it'd do the job just as good as a lethal injection if they're so worried about the chemical components.
  CraigW Assistant Commissioner

Thing is what do the people who do the lethal injections wear so the people doesn't see them? What I meant by doing a Sid Vicious is giving them an OD on heroin. I don't understand how people can use it and inject themselves with it but at least it'd do the job just as good as a lethal injection if they're so worried about the chemical components.
Serviceton_Kev

The people inserting the needles are not giving the lethal injection - they are only inserting the needles. The actuation to administer the dosage is carried out by another person who is out of sight of the condemned.

Lethal injection execution is getting more complicated because the (mainly European) pharmacy companies have been placing restrictions on the use of their anaethtics for lethal injection. In effect, they have threatened to withdraw the products from use in the USA if they are found to be used in carrying out the death penalty. So the various states have been trying different mixes of drugs to get around this. Some have worked well, others not so.

Craig w
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
The people inserting the needles are not giving the lethal injection - they are only inserting the needles. The actuation to administer the dosage is carried out by another person who is out of sight of the condemned.

Lethal injection execution is getting more complicated because the (mainly European) pharmacy companies have been placing restrictions on the use of their anaethtics for lethal injection. In effect, they have threatened to withdraw the products from use in the USA if they are found to be used in carrying out the death penalty. So the various states have been trying different mixes of drugs to get around this. Some have worked well, others not so.

Craig w
CraigW
I held my beloved Blueheeler in my arms as he quietly slipped into a permanent sleep after getting the needle to save him from Leukemia driven starvation death. Yes he was very weak but I didn't get the impression anything but the needle going in hurt him. The syringe was 50mm and I'm sure he was gone before she finished injecting him the full amount.

I struggle to understand why its so hard for a human to go the same way as even before the European drug companies had done this they still had issues, although not as many.

Maybe the problem is killing a dog is alot more routine and hence well known. Humans not so and there is still the uncertainty about someone reacting to the actual chemicals. Type in "botched executions" into Google. It has a modern list of complete USA F-ups of people being killed and much of it reads like a bunch of amateurs doing what should be a serious well polished excise. There is still one guy on death row in Florida they don't know what to do with because they couldn't get the needles into him. 4 years on he is still alive.  

If the execution was being carried out by others not linked to a state sanctioned murder, all those involved would be up for murder including the guys sticking in the needles. So everyone in that room is just as guilty as the guy pressing the switch.

I said it before, if they eventually work out they have killed an innocent person, the Governor should be up for manslaughter. They claim execution is a deterrent, but so should prosecution for killing the wrong person. Even in war time most civilized army's have penalties for an illegal killing.
  CraigW Assistant Commissioner


I said it before, if they eventually work out they have killed an innocent person, the Governor should be up for manslaughter. They claim execution is a deterrent, but so should prosecution for killing the wrong person. Even in war time most civilized army's have penalties for an illegal killing.
RTT_Rules
I have held a few of my fur buddies when they have gone on their last sleep. It is horrible and I do not understand how people can casually knock off an animal. Mine have all been cremated and when I go, my ashes and theirs will go in the one place.

On the part above, totally agree. In fact, if the Police are found to have falsified or tampered with evidence they should be done for first degree murder and face the horror they inflicted on an innocent person.

Craig W
  justapassenger Minister for Railways

I held my beloved Blueheeler in my arms as he quietly slipped into a permanent sleep after getting the needle to save him from Leukemia driven starvation death. Yes he was very weak but I didn't get the impression anything but the needle going in hurt him. The syringe was 50mm and I'm sure he was gone before she finished injecting him the full amount.

I struggle to understand why its so hard for a human to go the same way as even before the European drug companies had done this they still had issues, although not as many.

Maybe the problem is killing a dog is alot more routine and hence well known. Humans not so and there is still the uncertainty about someone reacting to the actual chemicals. Type in "botched executions" into Google. It has a modern list of complete USA F-ups of people being killed and much of it reads like a bunch of amateurs doing what should be a serious well polished excise. There is still one guy on death row in Florida they don't know what to do with because they couldn't get the needles into him. 4 years on he is still alive.  
RTT_Rules
This.

There are four reasons that putting down a dog comes across as simple to us:

1. A dog is small and so the lethal overdose required to be certain of a quick death is small enough that it can be injected with a simple syringe, where a human (especially if said human is a big male inmate who has been pumping iron in jail) is large enough that getting such a dose into them quickly is much harder. Most drugs work on a dosage per kilogram of body weight, and that's problematic for executions where the science is not well understood.

2. Dogs (and other animals) are put down regularly and it is accepted practice in the veterinarian profession, allowing such a level of expertise to be achieved that it would surely be included in every vet's undergraduate education. This is simply not possible for the execution of people by lethal injection, not only because it is rare but also because it's a trial-and-error process (e.g. the USA f-ups as mentioned) thanks to the medical profession not having a bar of it.

3. A sick dog is less likely to make a visible reaction if the lethal injection is painful than a fit human being executed, the appearance of it being peaceful might just be an illusion.

4. A dog is 'just an animal' and not another person. May not apply to certain less civilised regimes, e.g. Stalinist Russia, ISIS, China etc.


My guess is that executions in the US would become rarer if the prosecutors demanding the sentence, the judge/jurors handing down the sentence, any judges upholding the decision on appeal and the government officials approving it (e.g. state governor and attorney-general in the US, that small man Widodo in Indonesia) were forced to witness it (without any curtains being closed) and indicate their approval before it proceeded, with it being called off if any of them refused. Some accountability needs to be applied to death penalty advocates.

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