Rocky Mountain Express at IMAX, Melbourne Museum

 
  B 67 Chief Commissioner

Location: Central Gippsland
EDIT - August 6, 2016.
I thought I'd dig this thread up again to remind anyone still thinking about seeing this movie, that you only have a short time left to see it. Limited Screenings (certain days each week only) are still taking place at IMAX Melbourne Museum, but it all ends for good late this month when the 70mm film projection equipment is discarded in favour of digital laser projection.


On the website, select Sessions & Tickets > Select Movie (or Select Date). Next screening as of August 6 is 11am Saturday 8th August.



No matter where in the world, we all love the Romance of Railways.   Now you can take a historic steam train journey through the breathtaking vistas of the Canadian Rockies from the luxury of your cinema seat!  Shot and shown using large-format 70mm film on the truly giant IMAX screen (7 storeys high) you can now experience the ROCKY MOUNTAIN EXPRESS exclusively at the Melbourne Imax Theatre from March 26. To the watch trailer and find out more click here:  
[b][size=4]http://bit.ly/RockyExpress[/size][/b]

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  dthead Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
movie of the year !!!!!!

Regards,
David Head
  B 67 Chief Commissioner

Location: Central Gippsland
movie of the year !!!!!!

Regards,
David Head
dthead
I seriously doubt there'll be anything better than this for the rest of the year David. Wink
  TheBlacksmith Chief Commissioner

Location: Ankh Morpork
How come that train has a steam locomotive at the front and rear?
  B 67 Chief Commissioner

Location: Central Gippsland
How come that train has a steam locomotive at the front and rear?
TheBlacksmith
Because it saves having to suffer the indignity of a diesel electric coming to rescue it in the event of rockslides. Wink

Also, they appear to have the same road-number, so it is less confusing to have them on the same train.

Of course there's one other possibility, but we both know that one's far less interesting. Very Happy
  B 67 Chief Commissioner

Location: Central Gippsland
I finally made it back to IMAX to see this film last Tuesday. Well worth a look to see Larger-than-Life views of the mighty CP 4-6-4 in action.

Basically it's a documentary on the building of the railway across Canada. There's a sprinkling of historic black and white images here and there where needed to illustrate what once was and some old stories of interest (try to ignore the photos of 4-4-0 locos illustrating the story of a Consolidation that ran away in one incident, and exploded in another - ahem!), however, the majority of the footage is of Canadian Pacific H1b Hudson 2816 at work from all angles. Quite the experience on such a large screen.

Also while you're there, check out the model railway displays (static) opposite the main ticket counter (not the candy bar which is used in quieter times) and another display by the ARHS Museum downstairs on your way into the theatre.
  SAR523 Assistant Commissioner

Location: Chicago, IL
Saw this when it was in town a few years back.  The cinematography alone is worth the price of admission.

However, as mentioned above, there's enough well told (and in some cases, exciting) Railway history to make it more interesting than just watching a train run by for over and hour.  The scenery was sufficiently exciting that the wife tolerated sitting through it and might even have enjoyed it.  Not that she'd let on mind you.
  TheBlacksmith Chief Commissioner

Location: Ankh Morpork
Saw this film yesterday, and while is it well shot and the scenery is great, I did not find it good value. It is a 45 minute film that cost me $16 on a Senior's pass which I consider expensive. It must have been shot over a period of time, as the make-up of the train changed almost from shot to shot. Witness the magic disappearing diesel in the train and the variable number of carriages.
  x31 Chief Commissioner

Location: gallifrey
Saw this film yesterday, and while is it well shot and the scenery is great, I did not find it good value. It is a 45 minute film that cost me $16 on a Senior's pass which I consider expensive. It must have been shot over a period of time, as the make-up of the train changed almost from shot to shot. Witness the magic disappearing diesel in the train and the variable number of carriages.
TheBlacksmith

What organisation operates the trains and from where to where are they run?
  TheBlacksmith Chief Commissioner

Location: Ankh Morpork
What organisation operates the trains and from where to where are they run?
x31
You can read more about it here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Pacific_2816

This is not a regular train, it was a special.
  B 67 Chief Commissioner

Location: Central Gippsland
Saw this film yesterday, and while is it well shot and the scenery is great, I did not find it good value. It is a 45 minute film that cost me $16 on a Senior's pass which I consider expensive. It must have been shot over a period of time, as the make-up of the train changed almost from shot to shot. Witness the magic disappearing diesel in the train and the variable number of carriages.
TheBlacksmith
Didn't see this earlier Mr T. Blacksmith. Smile

It shouldn't be too surprising that the film was made over several journeys. IMAX cameras aren't all theat plentiful due to their expense and weight - and a few other things. So they can't make it in a weekend.

As for the $16 Senior's ticket cost ($19 for the rest of us), while I agree that it's relatively expensive for such a short film, when one looks at the costs of making an IMAX film, it may not seem to be too bad after all. The costs are also why the films are so short.

I was quite surprised when told the cost just of the print (copy of the film) itself and can understand why Rocky Mountain Express is in only one IMAX theatre at a time.

Here are a few interesting bits and pieces collected from various websites about making an IMAX film.

  • There are just a few IMAX cameras available. Camera rental is about $12,000 – $16,000 a week.
  • Film stock will run $2 to $3 a foot to buy, process and reduce for viewing/editing. You will likely shoot 150,000 to 250,000 feet (double that for 3D). Yeah, that’s half a million bucks in film stock, processing and work prints.

*Note, this is for a 40 minute feature.

One of the key challenges when making any IMAX film has to do with the film size. The size of the film means three things to a director:
  • The camera is immense. It weighs 240 pounds (109 kg), so it requires special supports and rigging to move it around. A typical 35-mm movie camera, by comparison, weighs only 40 pounds (18 kg).
  • The size of the film means that the camera can hold only a three-minute spool, and it takes 20 minutes to reload.
  • The incredible detail available with a film size this large means that everything about the shot must be perfect, and each image must be stunning. The audience sees every flaw, and a lackluster image totally wastes the potential of the IMAX medium.
"The cost and complexity in every segment of physical production is an order of magnitude greater with IMAX." In addition, "There are only two IMAX 3-D cameras in the world, so if you have a breakdown, you are standing around spending $100,000 a day on production costs."



Okay, the 3D part doesn't apply here, but I left it in "for interest"  Smile




Now, should anyone still be thinking of seeing this film, I'm told it shall be showing at IMAX Melbourne Museum until late August. After that, the 70mm projection equipment - and even the existing digital one, will be replaced by digital Laser projection.
  TheBlacksmith Chief Commissioner

Location: Ankh Morpork
Hello Mr. BeeSixtySeven, yes and that may all be well and true, except I don't believe the great majority of this film was shot using an Imax camera. Being a student of film making, and having worked in the business for a lifetime, I watched it with my critical 'film-maker's' eye and while some of it was quite high in resolution, a great deal of the footage was obviously shot by more 'manageable' sized cameras, and printed up.

And the 'flexible' approach to continuity was obviously designed to be missed by the average film-goer, but your average Gunzel would have a fun time watching all the railway continuity errors.

It was a nice travelogue, but a tad expensive for me, when I factored in the V/Line fare plus KFC and the flock of mandatory donuts Shocked
  B 67 Chief Commissioner

Location: Central Gippsland

I thought I'd dig this thread up again to remind anyone still thinking about seeing this movie, that you only have a short time left to see it. Limited Screenings (certain days each week only) are still taking place at IMAX Melbourne Museum, but it all ends for good late this month when the 70mm film projection equipment is discarded in favour of digital laser projection.


On the website, select Sessions & Tickets > Select Movie (or Select Date). Next screening as of August 6 is 11am Saturday 8th August.

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