Yet another bridge struck!

 

News article: Yet another bridge struck!

The driver of a truck carrying five cars has misjudged a low bridge in Melbourne's west, badly damaging four of the vehicles on the truck.

  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
The driver of a truck carrying five cars has misjudged a low bridge in Melbourne's west, badly damaging four of the vehicles on the truck.

The truck was rounding a railway bridge with a four-metre clearance on Napier Street in Footscray.
Yet another bridge struck!

Napier Street.  Where is the birdge in napier street?  That photo looks like the bridge in Dynon Road?

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  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
I take leave to doubt that the driver misjudged the height of the bridge.

My bet is that he didn't even think about it at all.

Instant loss of Licence is what these drongoes should get. They show so little care that they're a menace and should not be on the roads.
  awsgc24 Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney
FYI, there already is a thread on the TruckStuck subject.

See: https://www.railpage.com.au/f-t11376267.htm
  Graham4405 Minister for Railways

Location: Dalby Qld
FYI, there already is a thread on the TruckStuck subject.

See: https://www.railpage.com.au/f-t11376267.htm
awsgc24
But that is a NSW thread, this one happened in Vic...
  awsgc24 Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney
But that is a NSW thread, this one happened in Vic...
Graham4405

Fair enough, but each should cross-reference the other(s)
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
Fair enough, but each should cross-reference the other(s)
"awsgc24"
Why? if any action is taken it will be under the law of the particular State, and will have no relevance to any other part of the country.
  Gman_86 Chief Commissioner

Location: Melton, where the sparks dare not roam!
Napier Street.  Where is the birdge in napier street?  That photo looks like the bridge in Dynon Road?
bevans
Napier St is the continuation of Footscray Rd (before it becomes Buckley St) The bridge in question is located near the VU Nicholson Campus and carries the Williamstown/ Werribee Line. It's also right next to the Footscray Police Station, not that it makes much difference.
  Lad_Porter Chief Commissioner

Location: Yarra Glen
Why? if any action is taken it will be under the law of the particular State, and will have no relevance to any other part of the country.
Valvegear
Every State, and every part of the country, should be subject to the following rules:

(1)  Know the maximum height of your rig, including its current load,
(2)  Observe the "Low bridge, clearance xx" sign on approach.
(3)  React accordingly.  If it means backing up, do it.
(4)  Plan your route in advance.  Know where you cannot go with that load.

That's assuming, of course, that there will be a "Low bridge" sign, or similar.
  awsgc24 Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney

That's assuming, of course, that there will be a "Low bridge" sign, or similar.
Lad_Porter
The Sydway street directory marks low bridges and tunnels.

Cannot speak for Melway, Brisway, Perthway, etc.
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
The Sydway street directory marks low bridges and tunnels.

Cannot speak for Melway, Brisway, Perthway, etc.
awsgc24
Each state government transport departments can supply details of non standard bridge clearances, bridge loadings, heavy vehicle restrictions, overweight, over length and over height routes throughout the cities and their entire state.
Requirements of over dimension loads, permit conditions etc. etc.

It's all available, all you need to do is ask.


I'd be putting a lot more faith in information "direct from the horses mouth" than a third party possibly out of date street directory
  QSB6.7 Chief Train Controller

Location: Going off the rails on a crazy train.
Every State, and every part of the country, should be subject to the following rules:

(1)  Know the maximum height of your rig, including its current load,
(2)  Observe the "Low bridge, clearance xx" sign on approach.
(3)  React accordingly.  If it means backing up, do it.
(4)  Plan your route in advance.  Know where you cannot go with that load.

That's assuming, of course, that there will be a "Low bridge" sign, or similar.
Lad_Porter
Looks like that was lifted out of the truck licence books.

Pretty basic, not that hard to work out.
  Trainplanner Chief Commissioner

Location: Along the Line
Aren't there at least  5 factors at play here:

Human factors - driver training, standards etc
Availability of information about 'low bridges" etc - maps, signs etc
Technology to assist drivers like proximity warning systems or equivalent either built into the track or transmitters on structures that send out a constant alert to be picked up by a receiver in a truck
Better regulation, enforcement etc
The employers - trucking companies

If you take the rail, aviation and marine sectors that employ a range of integrated measures that are drawn from the five factors above that set out to minimize the risks of such events.

Yes we can easily blame the driver and even the guys in the industry have expressed views on Railpage about the standard of some drivers but the reallity is roads and trucking industry and drivers need to be considered as an integrated defense rather than relying on 1 single defense only.   That's why rail, air, and maritime are so safe by comparison.

It may also start to set about a more even playing field when it comes to real costs of trucking versus other modes
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy

Aren't there at least  5 factors at play here:
Human factors - driver training, standards etc

Availability of information about 'low bridges" etc - maps, signs etc

Technology to assist drivers like proximity warning systems or equivalent either built into the track or transmitters on structures that send out a constant alert to be picked up by a receiver in a truck

Better regulation, enforcement etc

The employers - trucking companies
"Trainplanner"
 No. There's only one factor at play - it's called the Mark One eyeball. Low bridges are signed, or at least they are in Melbourne anyway.

I'm sorry Trainplanner, but you remind me of the bloke who invented the steering column gearshift - a complicated way of doing something simple. In this case, it's know your height and read the signs. It is bog simple, and only an idiot gets it wrong. Get him off the road as a matter of urgency.
  Trainplanner Chief Commissioner

Location: Along the Line
I am in total agreement that the prime responsibilty lies with the driver.   So he reads the sign, realizes he can't get through.  So what does he do next try and back out and cause mayhem.   Or do we have requirements that he and the company he works for should plan the trip in advance etc, etc   We are not talking about little dinky trucks of 30 years ago.   The size of trucks and the scale and density of trucking operations in Australia in particular are now in a league that requires the trucking industry to move to similar standards as the other modes.  This includes recruiting the right people, training them, following up by retraining etc etc.   I have a friend who is 82 years old.  He has a heavy truck license and he can go out tomorrow if he so chose and jump into a truck and away he goes.  No serious checks, no serious accreditation.

You just can't keep working like that.  Yes the you are right the driver is the person we have to rely on to do the the right thing but you can't get away with just saying that today compared to the past.   Have a read of a few coroners and other reports in South Australia and NSW and see just how poorly vehicles are maintained, the lack of road knowledge of drivers and the almost lack of proper management by the companies concerned.   It's a much bigger issue than just saying its totally the drivers fault.
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
You just can't keep working like that.  Yes the you are right the driver is the person we have to rely on to do the the right thing but you can't get away with just saying that today compared to the past.   Have a read of a few coroners and other reports in South Australia and NSW and see just how poorly vehicles are maintained, the lack of road knowledge of drivers and the almost lack of proper management by the companies concerned.   It's a much bigger issue than just saying its totally the drivers fault.
Trainplanner
In Melbourne, what he does is look up his Melway.  For at least the last twenty years, and possibly more, every year's edition publishes maps of the Over Dimension routes in Melbourne and Geelong. In Victoria, you have to know these before you get a Licence Endorsement. These routes are also signposted. Bridges have clearance heights marked, and significantly low ones have advance warnings. How the hell can hitting one be caused by poor vehicle maintenance, lack of road knowledge, and/or lack of management? It is caused solely by lack of brains and/or vision by the driver. It seems to be a growth industry to find excuses for plain bad driving, rather than requiring people to take responsibility for their own actions. A major part of driving is being aware of what's around you, in front of you and behind you.  These bridge-hitters are the road's equivalent of "I didn't know the gun was loaded." Didn't look; didn't think; didn't check.  They even hit early warning systems which are strung across the road, and then keep on going into tunnels ripping down overhead signs. This is somehow someone else's fault? Give me a break.
  Gman_86 Chief Commissioner

Location: Melton, where the sparks dare not roam!
...It's a much bigger issue than just saying its totally the drivers fault.
Trainplanner
Sorry, you're just wrong.

In these instances of heavy vehicles hitting low clearance bridges, all of the culpability lies with the driver. There is no-one else to blame. It is the driver's job to make sure he knows the minimum clearance required for his vehicle (and its load), and it is the drivers job to know the route he is taking including all possible obstacles including low bridges, weight restrictions and truck bans.

To suggest that in some way somebody else should be responsible for planning the route would open up the door to allow offending drivers to shirk the blame onto someone else.

Also, I don't see how an unroadworthy truck can be blamed for a low bridge strike. I'm not excusing unroadworthy vehicles, I just don't see the link.

This is the opinion of a truck driver.
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
Agree 100% with Gman_86.  The fault lies with the driver.  If he hits a lamp post or a median strip or a tree, he carries the can. Hitting a low bridge is no different.
  duttonbay Minister for Railways

Based on the numbers of trees which have removed from the roadsides I suspect that hitting a tree is somehow being seen as the tree's fault.
  8077 Chief Train Controller

Location: Crossing the Rubicon
Based on the numbers of trees which have removed from the roadsides I suspect that hitting a tree is somehow being seen as the tree's fault.
duttonbay

Isn't that really the way Australia works?  If you can't find a way to make anything work at whatever just de scope and remove it. Smile
  railblogger Chief Commissioner

Location: At the back of the train, quitely doing exactly what you'd expect.
Isn't that really the way Australia works?  If you can't find a way to make anything work at whatever just de scope and remove it. Smile
8077
It seems to be the way the world works. Look for the easy stuff to fix, do nothing about the actual cause.

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