Favourite Aussie car -

 
  GrahamH Chief Commissioner

Location: At a terminal on the www.
Weren't the CL & CM the bigger ones (to compete with the Statesman & Fairlane), branded only "Chrysler"? A mate who was a motor mechanic owned a CM (IIRC). It had a 360 CID V8 under the hood and was a very heavy vehicle. The best fuel economy he could manage was 9 mpg. That's a whopping 31.4 litres per 100 kms! Shocked
Graham4405
The CL and CM were the Chrysler equivalents of the HZ Holden and XC and XD Falcons. They had a 4.0L six which both ran better and used less fuel than the 253 HZ or 250 XC & XD when driven in the same manner They were not the Chrysler by Chrysler cars.

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  Graham4405 Minister for Railways

Location: Dalby Qld
The CL and CM were the Chrysler equivalents of the HZ Holden and XC and XD Falcons. They had a 4.0L six which both ran better and used less fuel than the 253 HZ or 250 XC & XD when driven in the same manner They were not the Chrysler by Chrysler cars.
GrahamH
Yeah, a bit of Googling shows I was wrong. What my mate had was a Chrysler by Chrysler, but what model I don't know now. It was a very long time ago!
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat RFR Line
I enjoy my HZ Kingswood, though a bit heavy around town. The CL & CM Valiants were good cars too.
GrahamH

I reckon the 1970 VG Valiant's were pretty good....seeing as when I went through my mid-life crisis around 20 years ago, I got hold of a VG Valiant Pacer hardtop in TharSheBlue with stripes and decals and the HEMI 4 Barrel engine....it turns a few heads when I take it out on sunny days. Cool

http://www.google.com.au/imgres?imgurl=http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/77/1970_Valiant_VG_Pacer_Thar_She_Blue%25253D%25253D.JPG/400px-1970_Valiant_VG_Pacer_Thar_She_Blue%25253D%25253D.JPG&imgrefurl=http://www.wikiwand.com/en/Chrysler_Valiant_(VG)&h=267&w=400&tbnid=0dFR9yWKmeM9TM:&zoom=1&docid=pMLEa6vVF8jdtM&hl=en&ei=KwByVaevB8HwmAXv3IG4CA&tbm=isch&ved=0CHYQMyhQMFA


BTW, It think you may have been referring to a 1971 VH and onwards Chrysler by Chrysler which was the stretched by 4" wheelbase, luxury version of the Valiant sedan, also available as a coupé which often came in a 360 V8 and was released to compete with Fords Fairlane and the early Holden Statesman's.

Back to the 1970 VG Valiant, the again stretched by 4" wheelbase luxury version called the VIP was the first Aussie car to be released with standard integrated air-con, (which was a delete option if you didn't like these new fangled ideas), the first without quarter vent windows and the first to have a transistorised push button radio as standard.

http://assets.shannons.com.au/AKG118B3EBDA62OS/AAZ2BB3NO31UW244/nda9dzfntd7rrbjb/jpg/372x253x1/vehicle/1971-chrysler-vg-vip.jpg

Mike.
  Old Northern Locomotive Driver

I know that some designs of locks on them were not sufficiently secure, but quarter light windows are very good for getting fresh air in the car and, if your car also has them in the rear doors, they give excellent flow through ventilation when you have all four open.
  TheBlacksmith Chief Commissioner

Location: Ankh Morpork
My favourite Aussie car was the Volkswagen Beetle.
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
My favourite Aussie car was the Volkswagen Beetle.
TheBlacksmith
I trust you mean the real Beetle, not the poor attempt at a resurgence
  TheBlacksmith Chief Commissioner

Location: Ankh Morpork
I trust you mean the real Beetle, not the poor attempt at a resurgence
Pressman
Yeah, the real one we made out at the Clayton plant. I had several of them and also got to tour the plant.
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat RFR Line
...if your car also has them in the rear doors, they give excellent flow through ventilation when you have all four open.

...to a point. Only English cars had rear opening door vent windows, Vauxhall's, Wolseley's, Humber's etc.

Aussie cars had the front door quarter vent windows which as noted were easy to break into, however all Valiant's throughout the years had excellent cowl vents which let in a blast of fresh air, even after the door quarter vent windows were abolished...depending on your speed of course before the fan assisted 'flow-through' ventilation which was influenced by mid 1960's Japanese imports, was introduced in Aussie cars from (GM) 1971, (Ford) 1972 and Chrysler...never.

Chrysler Australia stayed with its earlier mentioned tried and true version without face vents, unless of course A/C was optioned from 1969 onwards.

Mike.
  Old Northern Locomotive Driver

Only English cars had rear opening door vent windows, Vauxhall's, Wolseley's, Humber's etc.
The Vinelander
Or Australian built cars based on English designs, such as just about everything built by BMC Australia.  My Wolseley has them, as did the Austin 1800 I learnt to drive in (both cars built in Australia at the Zetland plant and both differing in some specifications from the English cars they were based on).
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Norda Fittazroy
My father's 1940 Chev had separate quarter vent windows behind the rear doors. They were secured by toggle clamps which rattled at the slightest provocation.
  Carnot Minister for Railways

The CL and CM were the Chrysler equivalents of the HZ Holden and XC and XD Falcons. They had a 4.0L six which both ran better and used less fuel than the 253 HZ or 250 XC & XD when driven in the same manner They were not the Chrysler by Chrysler cars.
GrahamH
Yes, one of the better six cylinder engines made in this country.  Although it was marketed as a "Hemi" it was really just a non-crossflow OHV motor with slightly angled valves.  Whereas the American Hemi 426 V8 (the old one) had an enormous valve angle - the basic design is still used in nitromethane burning 8000+HP Top fuel dragster engines today.

Regardless, the Chrysler Aussie six was a tough motor with heaps of potential as evidenced by the weapon that was the E49 Charger.  I knew an engineer who worked at Chrysler in the 1960-70s who said they pulled up clean as a whistle after being thrashed on the dyno at up to 7000 RPM under full load!
  barkfast Station Master

favourite aussie cars: Holden FB/EK (I love 55-57 chevs!) closely followed by some 70s muscle in Valliant Charger, Ford XB coupe, Holden HQ monaro

favourite non-australian car made here: Mini K (only cause it was my 2nd car Smile )

right now im trying to convince the wife to get a 6 seater classic rather than a 7 seater SUV (not dissimiliar in price..)
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat RFR Line
favourite aussie cars: Holden FB/EK (I love 55-57 chevs!) closely followed by some 70s muscle in Valliant Charger, Ford XB coupe, Holden HQ monaro

favourite non-australian car made here: Mini K (only cause it was my 2nd car Smile )

right now im trying to convince the wife to get a 6 seater classic rather than a 7 seater SUV (not dissimiliar in price..)
barkfast


I didn't realise they made 6 seater MINI k's QuestionWink
  Old Northern Locomotive Driver

favourite non-australian car made here: Mini K
barkfast
And that too depends on how you define what an Australian car is.  BMC certainly blurred the lines here (think of the Morris Major Elite, for example).  Certainly the original Mini was not Australian but, by the time the Mini K was introduced to the Australian market, BMC Australia were claiming that these cars had 80% local content.  The Mini K (the K stood for Kangaroo - I seem to recall TV advertisements showing a kangaroo bounding along beside the car) was only built in Australia and did differ to some degree in specifications from the UK built Minis.

And, when you go back to the original models, the original Valiant was basically an American car and the 48-215 Holden (or FX, if you prefer) was based on a compact Chevrolet that never went into production.
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Norda Fittazroy
and the 48-215 Holden (or FX, if you prefer)
"old Northern"
Only if you prefer to be 100% wrong. There was never an FX model. It was the 48/215 and nothing else.
The first lettered model was the FJ, and the initials stood for the first year of its production. The FJ was 1953; the FE was 1956 and so on. If the code had been used in 1948, the 48/215 would have been GC.
  Graham4405 Minister for Railways

Location: Dalby Qld
Only if you prefer to be 100% wrong. There was never an FX model. It was the 48/215 and nothing else.
The first lettered model was the FJ, and the initials stood for the first year of its production. The FJ was 1953; the FE was 1956 and so on. If the code had been used in 1948, the 48/215 would have been GC.
Valvegear
Can you further explain this code for me? How does FJ = 1953, FE = 1956? I don't get it, neither can I find any reference to it via Google.
  cootanee Chief Commissioner

Location: North of the border!
Our families' LJ Torana with the 202 engine. On a Christmas family trip Sydney to Adelaide we averaged 78mph. Sweaty and dusty (no a/c). Only hiccup was a grass seed in the carby in the Adelaide Hills.

Fond memories. Smile
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Norda Fittazroy
Can you further explain this code for me? How does FJ = 1953, FE = 1956? I don't get it, neither can I find any reference to it via Google.
Graham4405
The code was for the last two digits only; it was assumed to be 19-something.:-
A = 0
B = 9
C = 8
D = 7
E = 6
F = 5
G = 4
J = 3
K = 2
L = 1

I don't think it needed the Enigma code crackers to break it, and I guess they used it simply because it was easy.
Had the code been in use in 1948, the 48/215 would have been GC.
The code was changed at one point, and I'll have to delve further to find out when and in what way - the aged memory is just not good enough. It would have been when the HD was introduced.
  Graham4405 Minister for Railways

Location: Dalby Qld
The code was for the last two digits only; it was assumed to be 19-something.:-
A = 0
B = 9
C = 8
D = 7
E = 6
F = 5
G = 4
J = 3
K = 2
L = 1

I don't think it needed the Enigma code crackers to break it, and I guess they used it simply because it was easy.
Had the code been in use in 1948, the 48/215 would have been GC.
The code was changed at one point, and I'll have to delve further to find out when and in what way - the aged memory is just not good enough. It would have been when the HD was introduced.
Valvegear
Interesting. The code must have changed in 1964, otherwise the EH would have been EG, HD EF, HR EE, etc..
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Norda Fittazroy
Yes; I forgot ( how could I? ) about the EH, so 1964 sounds right.
  Old Northern Locomotive Driver

Only if you prefer to be 100% wrong. There was never an FX model. It was the 48/215 and nothing else.
Valvegear
Which is why I said "if you prefer".  Most people (other than those of us who are pedantic about such things) would call it an FX - I would probably use 48-215 rather than FX, but it would depend to a degree on who I was talking to.  48-215 is the correct factory title, but I think that, at the time of their introduction, they would have been referred to simply as the Holden Sedan (or Utility or Panel Van).  The "FX" appeared later as a title to distinguish the FJ from the earlier car and was not given to the car by GMH.  One explanation I heard was that "X" was chosen because it signified something without a name.  Does anyone know who thought it up?
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
Unfortunately I don't have access to my dads records anymore, but he was a taxi owner.
I do remember that his paperwork referred to his 48-215 as "48 Holden sedan" which was then replaced in 1957 with an "FJ Holden", then in 1961 with an "EK Holden", followed in 1965 by a "HD Holden" (the first auto trans cab he owned), then followed by a "HQ Premier" (1970), with the last one a "HX Premier" (date unsure)

As you can see he would replace the cars on an approximate 4 year cycle. They usually received a "Short motor" (all bar new heads)after two years  They would have close to 300,000 miles (yes, miles) on the clock when sold.
He would also replace the cable clutch on the early manual transmission models with a Hydraulic after market system by the time they were 6 months old!

The coding would have to have changed in late 1963 when the EH was released, because the codes to follow were HD, HR, HK, HT, HG, HQ, HJ, HX, HZ.
Holden had a habit of releasing their models in October or November of the previous year (EH - 1964 model was released in late 1963), likewise the 1965 HD was released late 1964, etc etc)

A comprehensive list can be found here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Holden_vehicles_by_series
  Graham4405 Minister for Railways

Location: Dalby Qld
It would seem appropriate to link this site here:
Australian Muscle Car Sales

Not for commercial purposes, but for some of the awesome Aussie cars that can be found therein, both muscle and classics.
  Old Northern Locomotive Driver

On the question of coding, both the Valiant and the Holden Statesman missed a letter combination each:  there was no WC Statesman, nor was there a VD Valiant.
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
On the question of coding, both the Valiant and the Holden Statesman missed a letter combination each:  there was no WC Statesman, nor was there a VD Valiant.
Old Northern
Obviously certain codes where skipped because of the adverse connotations of the code at the time.
WC = Water Closet (Toilet)
VD = Venereal disease

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