Melbourne fares

 
  Mojo Beginner

Location: United Kingdom
Hi all,

I'll be visiting Melbourne from the UK next month for a couple of days, it will be on a Sunday, and then Weds - Saturday and was hoping someone could advise me on fares.

I'd like to cover as much of the tram and suburban rail network as I possibly can. What is the best ticket for me to get? Is there a daily pass or is this only available on Myki? If the latter, is it possible to get a refund of any unused credit upon departure?

Cheers

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  TOQ-1 Deputy Commissioner

Location: Power Trainger
There are no single use tickets in Melbourne, there is only Myki. Passes can only be bought for 7 days or 28+ Days, so you're probably just as well off using Myki money and topping up as you go. If you're only staying on the Suburban Network, that's all within Zones 1+2, so the daily cap for those is $7.52 on weekdays, and $6.00 on Weekends. A 7 day Zone 1+2 pass on the other hand is 37.60.

If you're using Myki Money you can just keep using the card until its in negative balance and then throw it out. Its what a lot of Melbournians do. You are meant to have enough on the card to cover the entire journey and you run the risk of being picked up if you do, so probably not the recommended course of action.

Refunding Myki isn't so easy, you need to physically send it to them along with forms. It's not the best ticketing system in the world, but its the one we are stuck with unfortunately.

Here are some links to PTV's information on Myki
Myki Fares
Myki Refunds and Replacements
Myki FAQs
  raudteejaam Train Controller

1> You will need to by a Myki. $6 for the card, or $14 for the visitor pack (includes 1 day worth of travel and a few discounts around town- worth looking at if you are doing touristy things besides travelling on transport). There is no other viable option, no short term paper tickets exist any more in Melbourne.

2> The Myki is valid for all trams, trains and buses in Melbourne, and also on most (if not all) V/Line services. It is somewhat versatile in that respect.

3> Travel around Melbourne is based on timed blocks, not distance or mode. A 2 hour fare, where you can travel till your heart is content is $3.76. Daily travel is capped at the cost of 2 x 2 hour ticket, ie, $7.52. Weekends are capped at $6 per day. It is cheaper if you travel wholly within zone 2 (the middle to outer suburbs) but I would suspect that would be unlikely in your situation. Travelling from Zone 1 to 2 or vice versa doesn't cost any extra any more- which is certainly a good thing.

4> Based on 3 days of weekday travel, and 2 days of weekend travel, you're looking at around $35 or so in fares, plus the cost of the Myki. I'd load up your Myki with $35 worth of credit when you buy it and you should be set. A 7 day ticket would be $37.60 in comparison.

5> You won't get the $6 back for buying the Myki, consider it a souvenir. Refunds of unused credit are possible- but it requires a form and then a cheque to be sent to you. I don't believe PTV staff can issue cash refunds for unused credit.

Just to confuse you further- you need to tap on AND off on trains and buses, but you only need to tap ON with trams. Tapping off won't cost you extra, but it's an unnecessary step. Additionally, all trams within the city grid (or thereabouts) are free, no need to tap on. If you do, you'll pay for the trip, and no refund will be possible.

If every in any doubt of whether to tap on or not, do so. Ticket inspectors are ruthless and frequent in my experience, particularly on trams these days.

Hope that is of some help!
  thadocta Chief Commissioner

Location: Katoomba
One thing to consider though, as a tourist you may resent having to purchase a myki, $6 per adult, $3 per concession, but public transport in Melbourne is outlandishly cheap compared with other cities around both Australia and the rest of the world, and when you add the cost of the card to what you will pay for the travel you will undertake, you will still be well in front (compared with other cities

Dave
  Mojo Beginner

Location: United Kingdom
Thanks for the replies guys. A friend of mine got me a Myki card in 2010, it hasn't been used before; will it still work?

Also, how does the Myki system work if say I wanted to just go travelling; say to the end of the line and then return back immediately? In London, with the Oyster system that would not be possible unless you go to a station with ticket gates, because the standalone readers don't let you touch out and back in again straight away because it thinks you have made an error.
  railblogger Chief Commissioner

Location: At the back of the train, quitely doing exactly what you'd expect.
Thanks for the replies guys. A friend of mine got me a Myki card in 2010, it hasn't been used before; will it still work?
Mojo
Unfortunately, no as they have a four-year expiry, however you should be able to swap it free of charge.

Also, how does the Myki system work if say I wanted to just go travelling; say to the end of the line and then return back immediately? In London, with the Oyster system that would not be possible unless you go to a station with ticket gates, because the standalone readers don't let you touch out and back in again straight away because it thinks you have made an error.
Mojo
If you didn't leave the station then you should be ok however do that and ticket gates will not let you through if your trip is longer than 2 hours. If you touched off then wait a few seconds before touching on again and you should be right.
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat RFR Line
Its important for those of us who have never travelled to the UK or used the London underground and suburban rail system that Melbourne's fares are miniscule,...that is tiny and laughably cheap compared to fares in London AND there's no cost to park your car at the local Melbourne railway station, though it's best to get in early if you do...

Mike.
  thadocta Chief Commissioner

Location: Katoomba
Its important for those of us who have never travelled to the UK or used the London underground and suburban rail system that Melbourne's fares are miniscule,...that is tiny and laughably cheap compared to fares in London
The Vinelander

Ummmm, isn't that what I said about absorbing the up-front cost of the myki in the first instance?

Dave
  Lad_Porter Chief Commissioner

Location: Yarra Glen
It's debatable whether Melbourne's fares are too low, or if London's are too high.  You also have to see it in relation to wages and disposable incomes in both places
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat RFR Line
Its important for those of us who have never travelled to the UK or used the London underground and suburban rail system that Melbourne's fares are miniscule,...that is tiny and laughably cheap compared to fares in London

Ummmm, isn't that what I said about absorbing the up-front cost of the myki in the first instance?

Dave
thadocta


You weren't being specific regards the stark cost comparison between UK and Victorian fares.
  mejhammers1 Chief Commissioner

It's debatable whether Melbourne's fares are too low, or if London's are too high.  You also have to see it in relation to wages and disposable incomes in both places
Lad_Porter
No debate. London Fares are high, Melbournes Fares are far too low. Wages and disposable incomes are similar in fact Melbournians would have more disposable incomes.

Michael
  melbtrip Chief Commissioner

Location: Annoying Orange
Hi all,

I'll be visiting Melbourne from the UK next month for a couple of days, it will be on a Sunday, and then Weds - Saturday and was hoping someone could advise me on fares.

I'd like to cover as much of the tram and suburban rail network as I possibly can. What is the best ticket for me to get? Is there a daily pass or is this only available on Myki? If the latter, is it possible to get a refund of any unused credit upon departure?

Cheers
Mojo
Dear Mojo- My advance to you is the following: If you have a car license, then you should forget about public transport and just hire a car out for a couple of days.

I when to Adelaide couple years ago and best thing I did was to hire a car.

Hire a car - allows you go to places you would not go if travel  via public transport and makes you holiday so much better.  

If staying in the city CBD free area - then it good idea to use free tram service.
  raudteejaam Train Controller

Hi all,

I'll be visiting Melbourne from the UK next month for a couple of days, it will be on a Sunday, and then Weds - Saturday and was hoping someone could advise me on fares.

I'd like to cover as much of the tram and suburban rail network as I possibly can. What is the best ticket for me to get? Is there a daily pass or is this only available on Myki? If the latter, is it possible to get a refund of any unused credit upon departure?

Cheers
Dear Mojo- My advance to you is the following: If you have a car license, then you should forget about public transport and just hire a car out for a couple of days.

I when to Adelaide couple years ago and best thing I did was to hire a car.

Hire a car - allows you go to places you would not go if travel  via public transport and makes you holiday so much better.  

If staying in the city CBD free area - then it good idea to use free tram service.
melbtrip

What better way to "cover as much of the tram and suburban rail network as possible" than by hiring a car to do it!

Sheer Genius!

(/sarcasm)
  Bogong Chief Commissioner

Location: Essendon Aerodrome circa 1980
Well with 16-ish? suburban train lines and the world's longest tram network, there's no way anyone could cover it all in just four days. In reality, there's even less time available to Mojo as peak times are packed and travelling is no fun at all

So perhaps we should suggest which routes Mojo should try? For a start, I'd suggest:

Trams.

No 8. Toorak to Moreland. The route from the city to Toorak heads down St Kilda Road before heading off down scenic Domain Road to Toorak Road which it follows through hectic South Yarra and leafy Toorak. The northern section from the city through affluent North Carlton. hipster Brunswick to ethic Coburg sounds interesting, but it isn't. So I suggest that you just do the southern bit from  the city to Toorak.

No. 35. City Circle. A route with elderly W class trams that commuters loathe, but which tourists seem to like. There is a truly awful recorded commentary that makes me cringe, but you do get to see some of the sights as well as venture into the concrete canyons of Docklands in (relative) safety.

No. 55. Domain to West Coburg. The bit through Royal Park is rather scenic.

No. 96. St Kilda Beach to East Brunswick. The northern part is pretty nondescript, but the section from the Royal Exhibition Building through the city down the former train line to dodgy Fitzroy St in St Kilda, along the scenic Esplanade, past Lune Park to Acland St is one of the best tram routes for a tourist.

No. 109. Port Melbourne to Box Hill. Follows the route of Australia's first railway line from Port Melbourne to the city. From the city it heads down scenic Victoria Parade, along ethnic Victoria St, through affluent suburbs to terminate in the overwhelmingly Chinese suburb of Box Hill.

Trains.
Much of suburbia is fairly generic, but once you get beyond the inner suburbs, the sections worth seeing are:

Belgrave line. Upper Fern Tree Gully to the terminus. This has the bonus of seven day a week narrow gauge steam trains 200 metres away.

Hurstbridge line, especially the part past Eltham which is semi rural and features a winding single track with wooden trestle bridges.

Williamstown line. A short spur line to the only really wealthy suburb in the west. A scenic peninsula with attractive buildings surrounded by water on three sides. Nelson Place is a good place to grab lunch.

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