Auscision Models Blog

 
  ed31880 Train Controller

Looks like the car carriers aren't faraway,  got my invoice for them yesterday.

These guys just keep churning out the models, but I'm not complaining.

Regards
receiving an invoice from Auscision isn't necessarily a strong indication that a models arrival is imminent.  in my experience, the time taken from receiving an invoice to when the model actually arrives can vary anywhere from 3-6 months.
Agreed, and we haven't  seen painted samples yet. I have received invoices in the last couple of days for several projects Auscision have on the go at the moment.
They are going to need something to release at Sandown. They don't like Exhibitions without new releases, do they?
comtrain
when was the last time the attended an exhibition and released an unannounced model and not just an unannounced livery?  I think there last attempt at Sandown with the SCT liveries of the GT46 was a bit of a flop and disappointed a few who expected more.

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  comtrain Chief Commissioner

Location: Near Albury Wodonga
Looks like the car carriers aren't faraway,  got my invoice for them yesterday.

These guys just keep churning out the models, but I'm not complaining.

Regards
receiving an invoice from Auscision isn't necessarily a strong indication that a models arrival is imminent.  in my experience, the time taken from receiving an invoice to when the model actually arrives can vary anywhere from 3-6 months.
Agreed, and we haven't  seen painted samples yet. I have received invoices in the last couple of days for several projects Auscision have on the go at the moment.
They are going to need something to release at Sandown. They don't like Exhibitions without new releases, do they?
when was the last time the attended an exhibition and released an unannounced model and not just an unannounced livery?  I think there last attempt at Sandown with the SCT liveries of the GT46 was a bit of a flop and disappointed a few who expected more.
ed31880


And we all know the VR L Class Electric was a flop at Hobsons Bay . But that only goes to prove Auscison don't always get it right. The only version sold out was 1150 and that was top of the list and accounted for about a tenth of the order. I guess? Not enough Victorians even remember loco hauled electrics, as they only frequented one line to the East, 99% of the time, or would even want to think about laying o/h wire?
The SCT Loco fail might have had to do with the "David and Goliath" syndrome in Melbourne. The John Smithers version of SCT's engine was actually quite remarkable. John does not always advertise or project the confidence customers might need to invest in product. But for an ordinary bloke living in an ordinary suburb with just ordinary income, and the support of family and friends, he went out and did an extraordinary thing! He developed an injection molded piece of rolling stock, and over time even had it assembled and decorated and boxed ready to run, all here in Australia till he was forced o/s.
Then he went and started his project to build an Auscision quality engine in Australia. He pushed so hard to build it here but as with the rock hopper, finally admitted defeat.
Then he looked at China. (Un) Fortunately (?? your choice) Train World (Note not Powerline) helped introduce John to the Chinese, and to the best of my knowledge, John ran with the ball, and developed the locomotive which was just unloaded in a container from the ship in Sydney within the last few days.

This is an amazing thing for the "bloke next door" to do. Train World might have put up some money, but John carried the model through to fruition.
I am fully expecting my SCT model to be as good as any other out of China, recently, just as I am fully expecting the few suspects here to knock it before too many are sold. These guys need to get a life Sad

Auscision underestimated the power of the friends network in Melbourne. Most of us down here are supportive of our home grown Australian Importer (Who tried so hard to be an Aussie Manufacturer)
As this is only my interpretation of the John Smithers saga, but I do think it is accurate. It probably needs a lot of filling out.

Auscision may lose respect for getting it wrong sometimes. They get it right 90% of the time and they have looked after Victorians extremely well, thank You. But being Sydney operatives it is understandable that they did not understand that releasing just one paint scheme 12 months or more before the rest of the order, was going to upset a lot of people, and make some of us worry about its intentions. In the end we should just be grateful for people like John Smithers, Geoff Hope, Ixion and Auscision. Three new starts and one who is so experienced mistakes are rare. Bring on the car carriers!
Cheers
Rod Young
  kingfisher Chief Train Controller

Looks like the car carriers aren't faraway,  got my invoice for them yesterday.

These guys just keep churning out the models, but I'm not complaining.

Regards
receiving an invoice from Auscision isn't necessarily a strong indication that a models arrival is imminent.  in my experience, the time taken from receiving an invoice to when the model actually arrives can vary anywhere from 3-6 months.
Agreed, and we haven't  seen painted samples yet. I have received invoices in the last couple of days for several projects Auscision have on the go at the moment.
They are going to need something to release at Sandown. They don't like Exhibitions without new releases, do they?
when was the last time the attended an exhibition and released an unannounced model and not just an unannounced livery?  I think there last attempt at Sandown with the SCT liveries of the GT46 was a bit of a flop and disappointed a few who expected more.


And we all know the VR L Class Electric was a flop at Hobsons Bay . But that only goes to prove Auscison don't always get it right. The only version sold out was 1150 and that was top of the list and accounted for about a tenth of the order. I guess? Not enough Victorians even remember loco hauled electrics, as they only frequented one line to the East, 99% of the time, or would even want to think about laying o/h wire?
The SCT Loco fail might have had to do with the "David and Goliath" syndrome in Melbourne. The John Smithers version of SCT's engine was actually quite remarkable. John does not always advertise or project the confidence customers might need to invest in product. But for an ordinary bloke living in an ordinary suburb with just ordinary income, and the support of family and friends, he went out and did an extraordinary thing! He developed an injection molded piece of rolling stock, and over time even had it assembled and decorated and boxed ready to run, all here in Australia till he was forced o/s.
Then he went and started his project to build an Auscision quality engine in Australia. He pushed so hard to build it here but as with the rock hopper, finally admitted defeat.
Then he looked at China. (Un) Fortunately (?? your choice) Train World (Note not Powerline) helped introduce John to the Chinese, and to the best of my knowledge, John ran with the ball, and developed the locomotive which was just unloaded in a container from the ship in Sydney within the last few days.

This is an amazing thing for the "bloke next door" to do. Train World might have put up some money, but John carried the model through to fruition.
I am fully expecting my SCT model to be as good as any other out of China, recently, just as I am fully expecting the few suspects here to knock it before too many are sold. These guys need to get a life Sad

Auscision underestimated the power of the friends network in Melbourne. Most of us down here are supportive of our home grown Australian Importer (Who tried so hard to be an Aussie Manufacturer)
As this is only my interpretation of the John Smithers saga, but I do think it is accurate. It probably needs a lot of filling out.

Auscision may lose respect for getting it wrong sometimes. They get it right 90% of the time and they have looked after Victorians extremely well, thank You. But being Sydney operatives it is understandable that they did not understand that releasing just one paint scheme 12 months or more before the rest of the order, was going to upset a lot of people, and make some of us worry about its intentions. In the end we should just be grateful for people like John Smithers, Geoff Hope, Ixion and Auscision. Three new starts and one who is so experienced mistakes are rare. Bring on the car carriers!
Cheers
Rod Young
comtrain
It didn't stop Auscisions versions of the SCT loco being a complete sellout and commanding a fairly big premium on the second hand market. Not sure they got anything wrong except underestimate the acceptance in the market place for the SCT version of this loco.
  comtrain Chief Commissioner

Location: Near Albury Wodonga
It didn't stop Auscisions versions of the SCT loco being a complete sellout and commanding a fairly big premium on the second hand market. Not sure they got anything wrong except underestimate the acceptance in the market place for the SCT version of this loco.
'king

Unlike you, (insert what you think I did not write here), I don't profiteer on the second hand market. So I would not know. But interestingly Auscisions defense at Easter was that they expected to be sold out before Johns loco arrived. They were right. However a falling dollar might do more to damage the model, than folk like you Wink
  kingfisher Chief Train Controller

It didn't stop Auscisions versions of the SCT loco being a complete sellout and commanding a fairly big premium on the second hand market. Not sure they got anything wrong except underestimate the acceptance in the market place for the SCT version of this loco.

Unlike you, (insert what you think I did not write here), I don't profiteer on the second hand market. So I would not know. But interestingly Auscisions defense at Easter was that they expected to be sold out before Johns loco arrived. They were right. However a falling dollar might do more to damage the model, than folk like you Wink
comtrain
Where is your evidence that I have ever profiteered from the second hand market (insert proof here). I don't buy my models to sell, don't need the money bud as my Commonwealth Super Pension has left me very well off and allowed me to retire at 55. How has anything I have said done any damage to the Railmotor Models version. of the loco.

Those most upset at Auscision releasing the SCT loco as their unannounced model were those who foolishly sold of their C's thinking that was the unannounced model.
  ed31880 Train Controller

It didn't stop Auscisions versions of the SCT loco being a complete sellout and commanding a fairly big premium on the second hand market. Not sure they got anything wrong except underestimate the acceptance in the market place for the SCT version of this loco.

Unlike you, (insert what you think I did not write here), I don't profiteer on the second hand market. So I would not know. But interestingly Auscisions defense at Easter was that they expected to be sold out before Johns loco arrived. They were right. However a falling dollar might do more to damage the model, than folk like you Wink
Where is your evidence that I have ever profiteered from the second hand market (insert proof here). I don't buy my models to sell, don't need the money bud as my Commonwealth Super Pension has left me very well off and allowed me to retire at 55. How has anything I have said done any damage to the Railmotor Models version. of the loco.

Those most upset at Auscision releasing the SCT loco as their unannounced model were those who foolishly sold of their C's thinking that was the unannounced model.
kingfisher
with regard to the C class, it will only be a matter of time before an up to date version is produced which will be far superior to the original Austrains C class.  The only question is who will bring a new version to the market first, Auscision or SDS.  With Auscision already announcing they are going to produce the NR, marketed as the ultimate version of the NR and the hints they have been dropping regarding the C class I am sure Auscision will be working mighty hard to bring their version to the market first.
  comtrain Chief Commissioner

Location: Near Albury Wodonga
with regard to the C class, it will only be a matter of time before an up to date version is produced which will be far superior to the original Austrains C class.  The only question is who will bring a new version to the market first, Auscision or SDS.  With Auscision already announcing they are going to produce the NR, marketed as the ultimate version of the NR and the hints they have been dropping regarding the C class I am sure Auscision will be working mighty hard to bring their version to the market first.
Yes that's a fair assumption. Last year Auscision announced they had many finished dies just waiting for a slot, or the right time to release. Only a few have surfaced.
Another assumption is that the C's will come off the main, sooner rather than later.
The rudimentary Austrains C Class was representative of The VR and perhaps  early V/Line version of these mighty engines.
A new C Class model can take advantage of better production techniques, better pad printing and better detail. Enough so that every incarnation of the C could be released much more easily.
The original windscreens on blue and Gold versions, Then X Class windscreen refit for V/Line and later. Air conditioner and changes to marker lights and hand rails all just a little bit different to match all the different paints.
(edits reflect  M636C corrections)
So after the 442, the 80 and GL, the C, X and T Class ex Austrains are a no brainer to do. (If they don't go to State based Steam) not much out there that will appeal to a national audience.
Cheers
Rod
  Poath Junction Chief Commissioner

Location: In front of a computer most of the time.
I was just looking through the c43/44aci order form and realised a lot has changed in the prototype world since the pre-orders started. I wonder which of the following liveries will be added to the production run.
CF class "Black Caviar" CF4412
CF class Freightliner CF4407+CF4408
6000 class Original 6000 class livery with Aurizon logos on side, QRN logo on ends
6000 class Original 6000 class livery with Aurizon logos on side & ends
6000 class with ACA prefix
6020 class ACC6030-6032
FIE class (3 locos, Fletchers International)
MRL class (6 locos, Mineral Resources)
XRN class Glencore logo (ex Xstrata)
PHC class (2 locos, Crawfords Freightlines)
  M636C Minister for Railways

The rudimentary Austrains C Class was representative of only one build of these mighty engines.

Cheers
Rod
comtrain
There was only one build of the C class.

Ten locomotives, all the same until the nameplate was fitted to C501.

There were subsequent modifications, like the front platform....

M636C
  meh Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney
ARG 22 Class Locomotives Coming Soon. Further information regarding prices, order forms, loco numbers & release dates will be available from our website soon.


Coming soon from Auscision.
  Trainguy01 Station Master

Location: Casino
ARG 22 Class Locomotives Coming Soon. Further information regarding prices, order forms, loco numbers & release dates will be available from our website soon.


Coming soon from Auscision.
meh
Can't wait for 42206!
  Poath Junction Chief Commissioner

Location: In front of a computer most of the time.


14 pics of C43/44's being painted in various liveries uploaded to https://www.facebook.com/auscisionmodels/
  Poath Junction Chief Commissioner

Location: In front of a computer most of the time.

"Some 48 Class Artwork teasers. Both the 48 & 830 Models are now expected to arrive in the 2nd half of 2016." - via https://www.facebook.com/auscisionmodels/posts/1123479891019281
  Poath Junction Chief Commissioner
  meh Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney
It will be interesting to see what the sign looks like in person; somehow i think the photo is distorting the look of it to make it look like a blue blur.

The model itself looks fantastic. Bring them on.
  Poath Junction Chief Commissioner

Location: In front of a computer most of the time.
It will be interesting to see what the sign looks like in person; somehow i think the photo is distorting the look of it to make it look like a blue blur.

The model itself looks fantastic. Bring them on.
meh
The blue blur is the uncovered lighting system. The Aurora wording sign isn't on the model yet.
  comtrain Chief Commissioner

Location: Near Albury Wodonga
It will be interesting to see what the sign looks like in person; somehow i think the photo is distorting the look of it to make it look like a blue blur.

The model itself looks fantastic. Bring them on.
The blue blur is the uncovered lighting system. The Aurora wording sign isn't on the model yet.
Poath Junction
Its amazing what they can do Smile

Miller Signs
  dthead Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
The rudimentary Austrains C Class was representative of only one build of these mighty engines.

Cheers
Rod
There was only one build of the C class.

Ten locomotives, all the same until the nameplate was fitted to C501.

There were subsequent modifications, like the front platform....

M636C
M636C
M636C,

I htink Rod is refering to changes to the C over time, noit as delivered, as the C's today  do have differneces.....

Regards,
David Head
  M636C Minister for Railways

There was only one build of the C class.

Ten locomotives, all the same until the nameplate was fitted to C501.

There were subsequent modifications, like the front platform....

M636C
M636C,

I htink Rod is referring to changes to the C over time, not as delivered, as the C's today  do have differences.....

Regards,
David Head
dthead

There are not many variations in the C class today.

Basically, green paint or blue paint, except for C501 that didn't get the long hood toilet added.

But surely the word "build" refers to locomotives as built, not as subsequently modified.

The main change to the C class when with VR/VicRail/V/line was the addition of the front platform.
Side hand rails, I think, came later but I may be wrong....

The original Austrains model represented them in VR colours.

Many of the later changes occurred after the model was released, particularly the new cab side windows.

But you can't blame Austrains for not making a model of locomotives that didn't exist when they made the model.
The biggest market then was for VR blue locomotives, and still is....

John Eassie even had me check my photos from 1979 to determine the colour of the side of the frame...

If someone wants to make a model of them as they are now (basically out of service) go right ahead.
But if you don't make a model of one in VR blue, (even C 501 with handrails) you'll lose sales.
It costs more to include variations in the dies, so you pay your money and make your choices.

I think they looked best in Silverton blue and yellow, and I have such an Austrains model, even though it is not strictly correct.

M636C
  a6et Minister for Railways


There are not many variations in the C class today.

Basically, green paint or blue paint, except for C501 that didn't get the long hood toilet added.

But surely the word "build" refers to locomotives as built, not as subsequently modified.

The main change to the C class when with VR/VicRail/V/line was the addition of the front platform.
Side hand rails, I think, came later but I may be wrong....

The original Austrains model represented them in VR colours.

Many of the later changes occurred after the model was released, particularly the new cab side windows.

But you can't blame Austrains for not making a model of locomotives that didn't exist when they made the model.
The biggest market then was for VR blue locomotives, and still is....

John Eassie even had me check my photos from 1979 to determine the colour of the side of the frame...

If someone wants to make a model of them as they are now (basically out of service) go right ahead.
But if you don't make a model of one in VR blue, (even C 501 with handrails) you'll lose sales.
It costs more to include variations in the dies, so you pay your money and make your choices.

I think they looked best in Silverton blue and yellow, and I have such an Austrains model, even though it is not strictly correct.

M636C
M636C
Any decision made by an importer in what version/variation of a locomotive type ends up on the model scene is fraught with danger, it is especially so with 1st generation diesels that have been in service throughout the years up to todays versions. In affect, a model can only be representative of a class, be that a small numerical class or larger one.

Todays modellers are in many ways very much spoilt for choice owing to a tendency to produce many, if not all variations of particular classes along with the wide ranging variations of colour schemes that have changed over the years, along with the old quirks that were permitted/tolerated in prior government operations.

Perhaps, Auscision is best for the amount of variations the produce in models, however, the modeler in this aspect can be thankful that the factory/ies they use do not appear to put a price disadvantage when more than the usual  half dozen or so different schemes usually allowed for.  I would sense though, they get stuck with a fair few models that end up being lemons in regard to popularity, when certain schemes prove to be less popular than indications would have for them.

Previously as was the case with most, a different or more modern colour would end up on a model that it should not have been applied to, but perhaps for the majority not a big issue.

To get accurate models, for a type, it would have to be a replication of a specific locomotive, based upon detailed photo's in colour taken at a specific time & probably location & the model is identical to that locomotive. Outside of that, models are only really a representation of a class, that operated over a certain period of time.
  comtrain Chief Commissioner

Location: Near Albury Wodonga

There are not many variations in the C class today.

Basically, green paint or blue paint, except for C501 that didn't get the long hood toilet added.

But surely the word "build" refers to locomotives as built, not as subsequently modified.

The main change to the C class when with VR/VicRail/V/line was the addition of the front platform.
Side hand rails, I think, came later but I may be wrong....

The original Austrains model represented them in VR colours.

Many of the later changes occurred after the model was released, particularly the new cab side windows.

But you can't blame Austrains for not making a model of locomotives that didn't exist when they made the model.
The biggest market then was for VR blue locomotives, and still is....

John Eassie even had me check my photos from 1979 to determine the colour of the side of the frame...

If someone wants to make a model of them as they are now (basically out of service) go right ahead.
But if you don't make a model of one in VR blue, (even C 501 with handrails) you'll lose sales.
It costs more to include variations in the dies, so you pay your money and make your choices.

I think they looked best in Silverton blue and yellow, and I have such an Austrains model, even though it is not strictly correct.

M636CAny decision made by an importer in what version/variation of a locomotive type ends up on the model scene is fraught with danger, it is especially so with 1st generation diesels that have been in service throughout the years up to todays versions. In affect, a model can only be representative of a class, be that a small numerical class or larger one.

Todays modellers are in many ways very much spoilt for choice owing to a tendency to produce many, if not all variations of particular classes along with the wide ranging variations of colour schemes that have changed over the years, along with the old quirks that were permitted/tolerated in prior government operations.

Perhaps, Auscision is best for the amount of variations the produce in models, however, the modeler in this aspect can be thankful that the factory/ies they use do not appear to put a price disadvantage when more than the usual  half dozen or so different schemes usually allowed for.  I would sense though, they get stuck with a fair few models that end up being lemons in regard to popularity, when certain schemes prove to be less popular than indications would have for them.

Previously as was the case with most, a different or more modern colour would end up on a model that it should not have been applied to, but perhaps for the majority not a big issue.

To get accurate models, for a type, it would have to be a replication of a specific locomotive, based upon detailed photo's in colour taken at a specific time & probably location & the model is identical to that locomotive. Outside of that, models are only really a representation of a class, that operated over a certain period of time.
a6et
I think we are getting tied up in "words" and descriptions.

I drove, washed and blocked, and operated these locomotives and took them through service at Dynon during their government time.
As a fireman, I watched them arrive brand new at Dynon, from the classrooms near the SG turntable. Our Class were taken over the first engine for instructions, before the drivers got trained on them. Some of you will remember Geoff Marks, a Dynon class room instructor who often drove a train in full bib and brace striped overalls with a huge Casey Jones American engineers hat and gloves, and you will understand how he and Jimmy Swann confiscated the engine to the turntable "to instruct the crews for testing purposes, and instruct the instructors by teaching the cleaners first Smile
Already one had a paint modification, as we could see the yellow stripes on the long end had been painted over blue.
During my association with this engine, I watched the windscreen opening being modified at Dynon, because they decided one windscreen should be allocated to both C Class and New X Class. A few got rebuilt because of accident damage, and the new nose handrail and walkway appeared. Cannot remember seeing a total rebuild, but it is likely this was done in their lives with V/Line? However in a total rebuild everything would be taken off the frame, and they would repair it, weld up cracks where necessary and undercoat it and repaint it like new. Every component would be reconditioned or replaced, and the loco would emerge almost as good as it looked that first day I was introduced to it.
Drivers and Fireman, Inspectors and Fitters called that a total rebuild.
I care not what outsiders might actually want to call it.
In the V/line days (I think?) we fitted air conditioning in the cab roof, rerouted rain water and condensation via new pipework and added a half moon shape clear of the front windscreen to mount satellite antennas and provide a ground plain.
We got Harmon fuel saving devices and extra radios ans antennas for Interstate working and safe working. We got roller bearings that were exposed and gradually after they were returned to service under National Rail and private ownership, we got different marker lights and hand rails as well as wheel creep control and possibly many other things that happened after my time.
All I was saying is that the original Austrains model represented as delivered or after the new windscreen modification, and was suitable only for a very short time, which I call the VR or the V/Line build
You cannot accurately repaint that locomotive into 62 (Wink )different liveries without taking compromises.
Cheers
Rod Young
  t_woodroffe Assistant Commissioner

My goodness, there is a lot of muddleheadedness relating to the VR/VLine C Class modifications here .......!

Modifications during VR/Vline service included:

circa 1978 Fitting extra handrail fireman's side near turbo
1979-80 Fitment of airbox retention tank
From mid 1982 Radios fitted
April 82 to 1983 fixed jumper cables (C 505 first April 1982)
1983 C 501 first overhaul (not total rebuild) at Sth Dynon. Overhauls thereafter at Newport.
From early 1986 modified handrails No. 1 end. No platform was fitted. The handrail modification allowed across-loco access.
July 1988 to Dec 1990 air con (Stone-McColl) fitted along with standardised impact resistant windscreens (these windscreens were made to fit both X 45-54 and C Class and thus rationalise inventory.)
By Oct 1990 No. 2 end pressurising fans removed. In some cases the waffle grille for the Dynavane filter was removed and the aperture blanked off.

I PM'd most of these modifications .....

TW
  comtrain Chief Commissioner

Location: Near Albury Wodonga
My goodness, there is a lot of muddleheadedness relating to the VR/VLine C Class modifications here .......!

Modifications during VR/Vline service included:

circa 1978 Fitting extra handrail fireman's side near turbo
1979-80 Fitment of airbox retention tank
From mid 1982 Radios fitted
April 82 to 1983 fixed jumper cables (C 505 first April 1982)
1983 C 501 first overhaul (not total rebuild) at Sth Dynon. Overhauls thereafter at Newport.
From early 1986 modified handrails No. 1 end. No platform was fitted. The handrail modification allowed across-loco access.
July 1988 to Dec 1990 air con (Stone-McColl) fitted along with standardised impact resistant windscreens (these windscreens were made to fit both X 45-54 and C Class and thus rationalise inventory.)
By Oct 1990 No. 2 end pressurising fans removed. In some cases the waffle grille for the Dynavane filter was removed and the aperture blanked off.

I PM'd most of these modifications .....

TW
t_woodroffe
Ha!
So up to 1982 you could randomly add a jumper cable plugged in and the other end draped over the handrail on front step, which is what I did instead of carrying the heavy buggers up the step and throwing it into an oily engine room where they were supposed to be stored. I don't remember using the fireman's side step without a handrail, so perhaps the step was an early addition as well? Also introduced May 77 to July 78, it sounds like a change might have been made on the assembly line at least for the end of the run. Either way I spent most of my time on them at  Wodonga and later at Dynon, with that handrail.

I think the windscreens were already modified before the bullet proof glass (black edged riveted frames) were fitted to all locomotives in 88/90. I remember the patched up paint and welds above the screens and rubber windscreen surrounds most clearly. We thought it was a pretty poor job.

But it is nice to put a correct list up of the external modifications that happened along the long C Class life, particularly as some are going into storage again.
If you are correct it is possible that old windscreens might have seen V/Line service up to 88, however I think the X Class screens might have been used earlier. In fact C Class windscreens were not available much longer than the initial spare parts received with the new engine, I think. We were asked to run damaged windscreens on the C Class on the SG for a few months because windscreens were unavailable and that was in mid 1980 before I was transferred to Jolimont.
Cheers
Rod
  t_woodroffe Assistant Commissioner

Original X 45-54 windscreens were NEVER fitted to C Class locomotives. The universal impact resisitant windscreens were fitted to both X 45-54 and the C Class during the cab upgrade program as stated above. The C Class were prone to corrosion damage around the windscreen seals and what Comtrain may have observed was touch up after repair of the cab front where the windscreens were fitted. I am not aware that any spare windscreens were part of the purchase of the C Class. A template of the windscreens was made up by the Sth Dynon carpenter and replacement windscreen glass was sourced locally (Nth Melbourne.) Things got a little trickier with supply when the AAR impact resistance windscreen glass was adopted.

The hand rail referred to was not that adjacent the step both of which fitted from new build.

TW
  comtrain Chief Commissioner

Location: Near Albury Wodonga
Original X 45-54 windscreens were NEVER fitted to C Class locomotives. The universal impact resisitant windscreens were fitted to both X 45-54 and the C Class during the cab upgrade program as stated above. The C Class were prone to corrosion damage around the windscreen seals and what Comtrain may have observed was touch up after repair of the cab front where the windscreens were fitted. I am not aware that any spare windscreens were part of the purchase of the C Class. A template of the windscreens was made up by the Sth Dynon carpenter and replacement windscreen glass was sourced locally (Nth Melbourne.) Things got a little trickier with supply when the AAR impact resistance windscreen glass was adopted.

The hand rail referred to was not that adjacent the step both of which fitted from new build.

TW
t_woodroffe
What we (Drivers) were told and even fitters were told were possibly in variance to what the white collar and ties, and other management knew.
My memory is still pretty good, and I am perfectly happy with my version of history Wink One job that was always going to put enginemen and fitters in the same room, was the Fuel Point. A job almost everybody in Dynon was bound to see a lot of. Crawling over engines at the wash dock, was a fact of life. Washing an engine was close and intimate, but information generally came from the fitters you worked with. I miss Rod Williams already. Rod would know Very Happy
Cheers (other) Rod
Cheers
Rod

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