CountryLink XPT Build help

 
  Trainguy01 Station Master

Location: Casino
Hi all
I am considering building a short backyard mini railway and of course I need a loco. The XP class loco has always interested me and I remember riding the candy liveried XPT at the Heritage Park Railway in Lismore with my son. So this loco was the perfect candidate. Anyway I was wondering, if indeed I do decide I want to proceed with this idea, how do I build it? Metal or aluminium seems to be the best option for the body, but how do I make it follow the architecture and have the detail of the XP class? I am new to this sort of thing so please forgive me if I don't know anything.

Any help would be greatly appreciated
Cheers, Wayne

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  dthead Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Not a lot of help but  I have seen two main ways,  making the rough shapoe and literlly bog the nose and file, sand until you get the shape.

The more popular way is to make a fiberglass plug, and make a mould. Someone made a scarificial plug out of foam which then just cut uo after makign the nose....

Sorry not specific but it might give you ideas.

Regards,
David HEad

PS I drive that Candy XPT in Canada in 2012.......  Wink
  geegee Locomotive Fireman

Location: Heathfield, S.A.
Hi Wayne,  Having built several 7.25 gauge diesel outline locos recently (Baldwin RF -16 Sharknose units) I trust the following info can be of assistance to you. Log on to "The Home Machinist" or http://www.Chaski.com under the heading of Riding Scale Railroading as I have uploaded photos and info on how I built them. There are 2 units shown. The D&H 1216 is a battery/electric and the NYC 3805 is petrol electric. I have included photos of nose/cab construction and also the chassis plus some other stuff. It will give you plenty of ideas to start you off. If you need any further assistance - give me a PM.
  Best Regards,   Graham.
  Trainguy01 Station Master

Location: Casino
Not a lot of help but  I have seen two main ways,  making the rough shapoe and literlly bog the nose and file, sand until you get the shape.

The more popular way is to make a fiberglass plug, and make a mould. Someone made a scarificial plug out of foam which then just cut uo after makign the nose....

Sorry not specific but it might give you ideas.

Regards,
David HEad

PS I drive that Candy XPT in Canada in 2012.......  Wink
dthead
Would making a mould of say fibreglass, then applying the the rough steel profile of the nose, followed by applying heat and hammering it in to shape work? The rest of the body seems easy as it is just rounded at the top corners and slightly rounded at the roof...
  dthead Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Not a lot of help but  I have seen two main ways,  making the rough shapoe and literlly bog the nose and file, sand until you get the shape.

The more popular way is to make a fiberglass plug, and make a mould. Someone made a scarificial plug out of foam which then just cut uo after makign the nose....

Sorry not specific but it might give you ideas.

Regards,
David HEad

PS I drive that Candy XPT in Canada in 2012.......  Wink
Would making a mould of say fibreglass, then applying the the rough steel profile of the nose, followed by applying heat and hammering it in to shape work? The rest of the body seems easy as it is just rounded at the top corners and slightly rounded at the roof...
Trainguy01
I think you are going the right way. The mould wil still need form attachment point t tne real chassie, and I'd put in a good strong support bracket as well so there is not too much reliance structurally id weigh is applied on the nose, and for collision.  Need to do a set of drawing to  then make the profile boards to check  in 3 axix your  "master".

Remember my words are not a expert but whatg I have seen - I have seen the  VMR's "A" bein built and other locos done.

Good Luck and contine asking away !

Regards,
DavidHEad

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