Sandgate Flyover gradient

 
  Newcastle Express Chief Commissioner

What is the gradient of the Sandgate Flyover please?

The curve & gradient maps if I'm correct were made before the flyover was made.

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  awsgc24 Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney
Sadly, curve and gradient books do not get updated any time soon.
Waiting for:
* Lawrence Road deviation
* Rappville deviation
Both on NSW North Coast line.
  Newcastle Express Chief Commissioner

Okay, I found some "update" gradient diagram, but that doesn't show the Sandgate Flyover. All it shows is Hanbury Junction Flyover with a gradient of 1:76 (1.32%)

But the Sandgate Flyover looks steeper than that, not to say it is.

Google Maps measure it from bottom of flyover to the level part of the top of the flyover roughly 280 metres.
  awsgc24 Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney
The Sandgate flyover has a rise and fall much shorter than the typical length of a freight train, up to 1500m. Also, the rise also cancels the fall. Drawgear forces may be a problem if the train straddles different grades, but this is hard to calculate. Overall, the Flyover gradient is probably not a problem.
  tazzer96 Deputy Commissioner

Not sure exactly what it is, but I would guess it is the maximum allowable gradient.  It is very steep.   When the XPT is hits the rise at 100kph, (after rather heavy braking) you can feel the engines roar as it tries to maintain 100km/h going up and the heavy braking to keep it at 100 while going down.   I also know that it is the the 2nd steepest railway gradient i have ever been on. (surpassed only by the ski tube rack railway).  It beats the hell out of the climbs you see on the NSW NCL and the blue mountains.
  tazzer96 Deputy Commissioner

Its probably so steep because most of the traffic would already be travelling at a minimum of 70-80 km/h.   And the traffic travelling that slow is generally long, so the short climb won't be an issue.   Xpts, Xplorers and express hunter line services would all be travelling at the full 100km/h and have a high power-weight ratio.   The only ones that it really isn't good for are the all stops endeavour services.
  cityrail-rulez Chief Train Controller

The Sandgate flyover gradient is contained within the "Drive Route Knowledge Diagram"
I have both 2012 & 2013 versions you can download the DRKD from https://railsafe.org.au/diagrams/drivers-route-knowledge-diagrams

I am also very interested in getting the curve & gradient diagram showing "Lawrence Road and Rappville" deviations on the North Coast line I have requested these curve & gradient diagrams awhile ago on Railpage and I was ignored!!!

EDIT: This thread here I was ignored https://www.railpage.com.au/f-t11380937.htm
  UpperQuad Locomotive Fireman

Location: 184.8 miles to Sydney
The Sandgate flyover gradient is contained within the "Drive Route Knowledge Diagram"
I have both 2012 & 2013 versions you can download the DRKD from https://railsafe.org.au/diagrams/drivers-route-knowledge-diagrams

I am also very interested in getting the curve & gradient diagram showing "Lawrence Road and Rappville" deviations on the North Coast line I have requested these curve & gradient diagrams awhile ago on Railpage and I was ignored!!!

EDIT: This thread here I was ignored https://www.railpage.com.au/f-t11380937.htm
cityrail-rulez
So, the Sandgate flyover gradient is shown as 1 in 25.
Just because no-one answered, doesn't mean you were ignored !!!
  awsgc24 Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney
Not sure exactly what it is, but I would guess it is the maximum allowable gradient.  It is very steep.   When the XPT is hits the rise at 100kph, (after rather heavy braking) you can feel the engines roar as it tries to maintain 100km/h going up and the heavy braking to keep it at 100 while going down.   I also know that it is the the 2nd steepest railway gradient i have ever been on. (surpassed only by the ski tube rack railway).  It beats the hell out of the climbs you see on the NSW NCL and the blue mountains.
tazzer96

The maximum gradients on the Main North and Main South are 1 in 40. Main West 1 in 33. North Coast 1 in 66 compensated. Rappville and Lawrence Road old lines were 1 in 50.
  cityrail-rulez Chief Train Controller

The Sandgate flyover gradient is contained within the "Drive Route Knowledge Diagram"
I have both 2012 & 2013 versions you can download the DRKD from https://railsafe.org.au/diagrams/drivers-route-knowledge-diagrams

I am also very interested in getting the curve & gradient diagram showing "Lawrence Road and Rappville" deviations on the North Coast line I have requested these curve & gradient diagrams awhile ago on Railpage and I was ignored!!!

EDIT: This thread here I was ignored https://www.railpage.com.au/f-t11380937.htm
So, the Sandgate flyover gradient is shown as 1 in 25.
Just because no-one answered, doesn't mean you were ignored !!!
UpperQuad
Yes, that is correct however the Sandgate flyover has a grade separation located at 171 km before this grade separation there would have to be some sort of easement grade but it doesn't show in the DRKD so I would say that the full basic gradients should be "from Sandgate" LEVEL, 1 in 425- (Easement would be here), 1 in 25+, (Easement grades 1 in 50+, 1 in 100+, LEVEL, 1 in 100-, 1 in 50- Easement grade end) 1 in 25-, 1 in 627- (Heading towards Hexham)

I am not sure how to work out the easement between the 1 in 425- to the 1 in 25+ grades but between the two grades there will be a LEVEL grade as that's how I see it, I could be wrong about it all but it should give some sort of guide Smile

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