DJH NSWGR models

 
  wally-wowser1 Train Controller

Location: overlooking the Mt vic washaway on Soldiers Pinch
Have seen a collection of DJH models , mainly NSWGR prototype  . What is their quality like & would they be worth  while to consider as a collection .  The owner does not want to sell his collection  but I would consider starting a collection my self for the future after seeing what this guy has .

Thanks  for any info .

Wally .

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  apw5910 Deputy Commissioner

Location: Location: Location.
What do you mean by "collection." If you mean "collectable" then DJH are probably not what you want. They are etched brass and whitemetal kits, meant to be put together and run on a model railway. They can be made to look and run very nice, almost prototypical, but it is a fair degree of work. If you just intend to buy models to put in a display case, then picking up "brass" from whoever still sells the stuff might be more what you want.

Anyway, are DJH (Lloyds) models of NSWGR prototype still being sold?
  brissim Chief Train Controller

What do you mean by "collection." If you mean "collectable" then DJH are probably not what you want. They are etched brass and whitemetal kits, meant to be put together and run on a model railway. They can be made to look and run very nice, almost prototypical, but it is a fair degree of work. If you just intend to buy models to put in a display case, then picking up "brass" from whoever still sells the stuff might be more what you want.

Anyway, are DJH (Lloyds) models of NSWGR prototype still being sold?
apw5910
Yes the DJH kits are still available (at least some of them) from AR Kits although I do recall he was looking at another source for similar kits because they are becoming expensive.

As for collecting the DJH kits for a collection there may be some merit in it. The biggest problem with the DJH kits is the amount of effort you have to put into their construction to get a free running model. If - on the other hand - you simply wanted a collection for display purposes, as long as they were professionally assembled, painted and (possibly) weathered you'll end up with largely accurate good looking locos. But just be aware not to look on it as an investment. Yes buying pre-build brass models may be an alternative for display purposes but besides been hard to come by these days, brass models doesn't necessarily mean an accurate model (eg PSM 38 Class).


Tony
  a6et Minister for Railways

There's a lot of work to put them together, if they are going to be collections in a glass case no big deal if you have the time and abiliities to put them together.

Bare in mind that the kits basically date back to around 1982/3 I do not think there has been any real upgrades with them since ownership has been changed nor beforehand. While they look ok when assembled by people with the know how and skills, they really need to be updated in many areas.

EG, the 3 standard goods type loco's 50, 53 and 55 each share the same boiler/firebox unit, with all the dimples meant to be drilled out are designed for the 50cl, which means you will have to alter the drill spots for the hand rails, water delivery pipes, pump and a couple of other areas.

Patience is needed in the build and if they are meant to run, then the wheels and motions need to be free rolling before the motors are added.

If you go down the track and build them, make sure you clean any flashing off carefully and use some fine grade steel wool to polish the white metal main components for a smooth finish.
  Iain Chief Commissioner

Location: Concord, NSW
You mean shock! horror! that you have to do some modelling!

Iain
  Roachie Chief Commissioner

Location: Kadina SA (formerly NSW)
There's a lot of work to put them together, if they are going to be collections in a glass case no big deal if you have the time and abiliities to put them together.

Bare in mind that the kits basically date back to around 1982/3 I do not think there has been any real upgrades with them since ownership has been changed nor beforehand. While they look ok when assembled by people with the know how and skills, they really need to be updated in many areas.

EG, the 3 standard goods type loco's 50, 53 and 55 each share the same boiler/firebox unit, with all the dimples meant to be drilled out are designed for the 50cl, which means you will have to alter the drill spots for the hand rails, water delivery pipes, pump and a couple of other areas.

Patience is needed in the build and if they are meant to run, then the wheels and motions need to be free rolling before the motors are added.

If you go down the track and build them, make sure you clean any flashing off carefully and use some fine grade steel wool to polish the white metal main components for a smooth finish.
a6et
As with most things, the more you do...the better you become.

I used to build DJH steam locos as a second income back in the 90s. The late Tom Fisher (whom I knew fairly well), gave me 20 DJH 60 class Garratt kits to build for him, along with numerous others (several each of the 36, 38, 57, 58, 59 class).

I got to the stage where I could deliver one Garratt to his Fyshwich shop every Monday morning on my way to work (at the NAB).

My "system" was to start a new Garratt on the Saturday morning. By Sunday night I had the two chassis built and operating, including the bogies. Monday and Tuesday evenings I'd do the boiler, complete with all detail. Wednesday eveing I'd do the front super-structure and Thursday evening the coal bunker superstructure.

Friday evening would be clean and prep for painting. The weekend would be used to paint (air brush) several coats of black/grimy black etc. This would be done and the "next" loco be commenced during the drying time. Sunday arvo/evening would be final touches such as brass cab numbers and decals. Packing done on Monday morning before I left for work.

These locos were not DCC equipped and didn't have any glazing or lighting....which made the job a LOT easier.

All major construction was done with solder, whilst the small detail additions were done with good quality superglue.

So, there you go...it can be done. It always amuses me when I read that somebody has been working on a Garratt for 12 months (or more!!!) and has finally got the chassis built.

Roachie
  apw5910 Deputy Commissioner

Location: Location: Location.
So, there you go...it can be done. It always amuses me when I read that somebody has been working on a Garratt for 12 months (or more!!!) and has finally got the chassis built.

Roachie
Roachie
Yeah, but they probably Have A Life. Unlike somebody banging together model locos to supplement income...

Btw, I was also doing exactly that in the early nineties, putting DJH kits together to earn money. 18% interest rates, what fun. I put together quite a few, but only two garratts, and didn't get up to your "mass production" numbers. Well done!
  Roachie Chief Commissioner

Location: Kadina SA (formerly NSW)
So, there you go...it can be done. It always amuses me when I read that somebody has been working on a Garratt for 12 months (or more!!!) and has finally got the chassis built.

Roachie
Yeah, but they probably Have A Life. Unlike somebody banging together model locos to supplement income...

Btw, I was also doing exactly that in the early nineties, putting DJH kits together to earn money. 18% interest rates, what fun. I put together quite a few, but only two garratts, and didn't get up to your "mass production" numbers. Well done!
apw5910
Yeah, I still managed to assist my wife to "produce" and raise three sons during that time too. My evening working hours were about 7pm til 11.30pm.....time I would otherwise have been planted in front of the idiot box.....I didn't have a layout in those days and didn't socialise (still don't!!! hahaha).

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