Brass etches and superglue - frustrated!

 
  Gremlin Assistant Commissioner

I have just spent an entertaining (?) 12 hours attempting to use superglue (as per the model instructions) to attach the top radiator brass etch to the body of a Peter Boorman NSWGR 400 class.

Nothing, and I mean nothing, will make the brass etch glue solidly.  I have tried fast superglue, slow superglue, I have weighted the etch to the attachment points...it will not stay stuck.  Last effort was slo-zap with 10g weights on top of the points of contact and waited for 4 hours.  Seems attached until touched, then the brass etch just fell off.

Is there a better way?  Have tried both slo-zap and loctite superglue, no difference in their lack of working Sad

Cheers

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  allan Chief Commissioner

Have you tried a gel?

Superglues work best where there is a tight fit. If the fit is loose, try a gel, and give it 24 hours.
  Gremlin Assistant Commissioner

A gel...as in superglue gel?  Can you recommend a brand please?
  allan Chief Commissioner

I use the cheapest...
  Roachie Chief Commissioner

Location: Kadina SA (formerly NSW)
I built two of those 400s back in the days when they were manufactured by (I think) Stephen Johnson Models.

Not sure if the same applies, but I found that a "mechanical restraint" worked best for my needs.....from memory.

I seem to recall adding a finely-shaped "U" bracket made from 0.35mm brass wire through holes I drilled through the roof. The ends of the wire were bent over on the inside of the roof so they couldn't lift up.

If this is done in the right places, there is virtually no evidence of it once the model is painted.

If you want to persist with the glue-only method, then I'm thinking that a small blob of "Plastibond" (a 2 part epoxy) would be a possible contender. You mix up a very small amount of the 2 parts and use a tooth pick or similar to apply it. It sets VERY quickly and is rock hard when fully cured. Working time is quite short.

Good luck

Roachie
  DJPeters Deputy Commissioner

Like resin , brass might need a bit of a rough up that is sand the back of the parts to remove not only tarnish but also to make scratches and grooves on the brass surface. The greater the surface area that the glue grips the better the hold will be. And if using superGlue then use it sparingly, more is not better actually, Apply the superglue with a tooth pick or similar to the back of it and place it in place, Also if the kit is resin then you may need to also roughen the area where the things go a bit. It does make a difference though as any one who has put together a resin kit would tell you. Hope that helps you a bit!

One other thing to try is some clear varnish or clear coat as well it will stick small brass pieces to things as it is used to hold brass name plates etc onto models.
  Gremlin Assistant Commissioner

Like resin , brass might need a bit of a rough up that is sand the back of the parts to remove not only tarnish but also to make scratches and grooves on the brass surface. The greater the surface area that the glue grips the better the hold will be. And if using superGlue then use it sparingly, more is not better actually, Apply the superglue with a tooth pick or similar to the back of it and place it in place, Also if the kit is resin then you may need to also roughen the area where the things go a bit. It does make a difference though as any one who has put together a resin kit would tell you. Hope that helps you a bit!
DJPeters
Thanks for the tips!  I used the toothpick method, but will now try with Loctite Gel...after sanding (gently) the etching and the contact points Smile
  DJPeters Deputy Commissioner

To anyone using superglue to put something securely onto something  else a few things need to be considered.

First up if the model is painted and you want to securely stick a after market part on the gently scrape away a small area of paint and stick the part to the actual body not the painted surface. It will still stick to the paint surface but it can very easily come off if accidentally knocked or something. A small touch up may be needed after to hide the paint that was removed.

Next is roughing up components if it is possible. A quick bit of sanding on either brass parts or resin pieces of any type of resin where a glue join has to be made will make it a stronger grip. Super glue does not like resins used to make kits for model railways and roughing up the joins will save much hair pulling and blue language as well. Roughing up pieces makes the surface area greater and thus the glue has a better hold on it. Brass is flat and very smooth so rough up the back of it. Brass also corrodes quickly and this corroding can sometimes interfere with the glue that needs to be super glued to another material.

Are the parts clean as like painting  or even soldering cleaniness is the best way to go, even the grease or oil from your skin can stop a good glue joint being made. Handle the actual joins before gluing using  clean rubber gloves or something so you do not touch the actual model with your bare hands.

And finally like Allan said super glue needs a tight fitting join to make a good joint, capillary action will draw the glue into a joint. So keep fingers away from joints while gluing them.

Above all it might say that it glues it in a minute or so, and it usually does, but allow it to fully set overnight or 24 hours before you go and do anything more to it.

The less you use the better it will be, super glue is not like other glues were more is better as if you do use more it can actually weaken a joint rather than make it stronger.

Oh and a golden rule for kits is if you use super glue to hold a section in place then use some other kind of glue like a two part epoxy or something to give a stronger hold on any joint that could have stress on it as superglue is no good for parts that are under any real stress all the time they will eventually let go.

One other thing is do not use superglue to put in window material of any sort it will fog the windows over very badly more so if it is inside an enclosed model.

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