Adelaide train fire leads to audit of entire rail fleet

 
Topic moved from News by dthead on 30 Sep 2019 17:50
  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales
Reminds us of the fire in the printer at Seymour but that I think was electrical

Adelaide train fire leads to audit of entire rail fleet

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  DJPeters Assistant Commissioner

Now these cars have had smaller diesel engines placed into them to replace the larger ones used previously and while the smaller ones are comparable power wise could it be that overheating might be a problem as the newer motors really rev now a  lot louder than the old motors. Not saying it is the cause it might just be a broken fuel line, but it does seem that in all the years with the original type of engines in them no incidents like this appeared but now with the smaller newer type it has happened. Of recent times I think the cars are beginning to feel the strain as they age as well cars breaking down for all sorts of reasons from simply running out of fuel, I was on one that this happened to, to the electrical systems giving up the ghost, so it might be time I think that electrifying the whole of the Adelaide metro system was looked at.

Some new electric trains purchased and these 3000 type of railcars put out to pasture.
  mawsonboii Locomotive Driver

Our Government needs to stop being cheap. electrify the network and buy new trains.
  Gayspie Assistant Commissioner

Location: Adelaide, SA
Why were our pox box train engines downgraded from V12's to V8's not so long go anyways ?
  justapassenger Chief Commissioner

They saw that the current V6 F1 cars are beating the lap records set by V8, V10 and V12 F1 cars in the past and decided that it was time to start reducing the number of cylinders to be more like the current F1 cars.

Also, the new V8 engines (390kW) are more powerful than the previous V12 engines (354kW) and weigh less, so it's actually an upgrade. They don't seem to be breaking down as often as the previous engines did, so it looks like it has already been an improvement.
  SAR523 Assistant Commissioner

Location: Chicago, IL
Depends what you mean by ‘Downgraded’.

A modern V8 engine design should be expected to be superior to an older V12.

Other than the example of the F1 engines already provided you can see this in inline 4s on the market today that are superior in essentially every way to some V8s that were being sold in the 80s. Simply making the bore larger and adding more cylinders solved some problems at the time, but there are different solutions available today.

True, a diesel that is turning a generator at a relatively steady rpm is quite different from a car engine, but you’ve still got the same improvements in materials, electronic control and sensors which give you better compression, timing and fuel efficiency available.

A modern V12 would still be more powerful  than a modern V8, but if the V8 does the job, why pay for the extra weight and additional parts (read: more maintenance) than you need?
  Aaron Minister for Railways

Location: University of Adelaide SA
These days in all forms of engineering to upgrade is to downsize, to resort to ‘making it bigger’ to gain improvement is effectively an insult.
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
These days in all forms of engineering to upgrade is to downsize, to resort to ‘making it bigger’ to gain improvement is effectively an insult.
"Aaron"
It seems to have finally put an American car maker's idea to rest . . . "There ain't no substitute for cubes."
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
These days in all forms of engineering to upgrade is to downsize, to resort to ‘making it bigger’ to gain improvement is effectively an insult.
It seems to have finally put an American car maker's idea to rest . . . "There ain't no substitute for cubes."
Valvegear
There was a time this was true, but.... Top Gear UK did a story on some big yank cars and they identified car "x" (cannot remember) from 60's or 70's likely to have the worlds biggest and least powerful V8 at less than 200HP and at least 5.8L.

Today's engines are smaller, more powerful, more reliable, last longer and burn cleaner, moral of the story, its nearly 2020, ignore the number of piston's look at engine output.

...and in 10 years time in many applications in our lives, we will not longer be talking pistons, rather batteries etc as talking pistons will be akin to talking steam age today.

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