A visit to Jilalan Yard - January 2020

 
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
On January 2 I visited Jilalan Yard, here is what I found:



















Video of the yard can be viewed at: http://dams.omni.com.au:8080/razuna/raz2/dam/index.cfm?fa=c.sv&f=D3438CBBD3504660A57583802196A3E8&v=o

The video shows a PN Coal train arriving through the yard loaded and en route to the unloader.

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  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Leaving the yard lookout travelled to the down eastern side and continued to record the PN service heading to the unloader.

http://dams.omni.com.au:8080/razuna/raz2/dam/index.cfm?fa=c.sv&f=B4EF442FE0134157805B5A3E02B42C11&v=o

Spent some time at Armstrong Beach and on returning the PN empty was sitting at Jilalan waiting got a departure.



The following image is HD hi-resolution. Loco 8333.  Click on the image for a full version of the image.


  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Added to Flickr for Loco tagging.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/62346766@N07/49411940406

Now we have a loco picture for 8333 in the database

https://www.railpage.com.au/locos/83-class/8333
  duttonbay Minister for Railways

'twas a bit different back in 1976. Like most places, we were given free reign "but don't get killed" and it was even suggested we might like to climb up onto the roof of the workshops where "there was a good view".  Day or night...

CM01 2137-2110-2102 and 2108-2100-2107-LRC55 before 'marriage', ety coal, Jilalan Wed26May76
by duttonbay, on Flickr

CL25 2140-2101-2104 ety coal Jilalan at night Tue25May76
by duttonbay, on Flickr
  M636C Minister for Railways

For those unfamiliar with the area....

The shed on the right of the two in Bevans' views of the service area from the Jilalan lookout is the shed in Duttonbay's 1976 views...
The increase in size of the yard is hard to understand. Bevan's photos only show the north end of the yard.

As others have said, good shots can be taken from the area around the Armstrong Beach Road bridge of trains in both directions from the east side in the morning and some shots of empty trains in the afternoon from the west side.

The G wagon on display was unloaded in a rotary tippler.
The stop start action was very hard on draft gear and the process was slower than using hopper cars so hopper cars replaced the tippler wagons.

Peter
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
As others have said, good shots can be taken from the area around the Armstrong Beach Road bridge of trains in both directions from the east side in the morning and some shots of empty trains in the afternoon from the west side.
M636C

Thanks for your contribution Peter.

This in indeed where I took the video of the departing PN service for the port.
  duttonbay Minister for Railways

For those unfamiliar with the area....

The shed on the right of the two in Bevans' views of the service area from the Jilalan lookout is the shed in Duttonbay's 1976 views...
The increase in size of the yard is hard to understand. Bevan's photos only show the north end of the yard.
M636C
In 1976 there was only the Hay Point unloader. The larger Dalrymple Bay unloading facility has been added since then, which I suspect explains the increase in the size of the yard. Back in 1976 the trains, with three DEs on the front, and three mid-train, were split and unloaded separately - does this still happen these days? I was last there in 1984 - the Hay Point trains were still being split, but I can't tell from my photos what happened to the Dalrymple Bay trains. Back in 1984 there was public access above the tipplers, as shown here:

https://flic.kr/p/2ihPKY2
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat RFR Line
One big difference between the 1970's image and the image of today, over 40 years later is the presence of the overhead catenary. However the modern day image has diesel locos...so are there still electric loco's operating OR has it all gone back to diesel loco operation Question

Mike.
  Sulla1 Chief Commissioner

It's almost all electric on the Goonyella System with only a few diesel sets in use, mostly from the reopened Blair Athol mine where there is no catenary on the former Blair Athol to Clermont branch. Newlands line trains also transit parts of the Goonyella System with diesel sets. Aurizon has 160 electric locos in use, PN has 42 and BMA has 13.



https://youtu.be/lqEyKfNwoV0
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
It's almost all electric on the Goonyella System with only a few diesel sets in use, mostly from the reopened Blair Athol mine where there is no catenary on the former Blair Athol to Clermont branch.
Sulla1

Was this branch ever electrified?
  Sulla1 Chief Commissioner

Clermont to Blair Athol Branch electrification? Short story, no.

The branch was built in 1987 as a connection between Clermont and the new Blair Athol line from the Goonyella System. It was built primarily for grain and was never electrified and has been closed for several years.

When Rio Tinto closed the Blair Athol Mine, its new Clermont mine continued using the Blair Athol rail loading infrastructure.

When Terracom Resources purchased and reopened the Blair Athol mine a couple of years ago it couldn't access the old rail loading infrastructure now used by Glencore (having purchased Clermont), so it had to build a new loadout on part of the closed branch, which was partly reopened by Aurizon. Only a few kilometres is back in use.
  Big J Deputy Commissioner

Location: In Paradise
In 1976 there was only the Hay Point unloader. The larger Dalrymple Bay unloading facility has been added since then, which I suspect explains the increase in the size of the yard. Back in 1976 the trains, with three DEs on the front, and three mid-train, were split and unloaded separately - does this still happen these days? I was last there in 1984 - the Hay Point trains were still being split, but I can't tell from my photos what happened to the Dalrymple Bay trains. Back in 1984 there was public access above the tipplers, as shown here:

duttonbay
They currently don't split for unloading. The whole lot goes through on balloon loops for unloading. I imagine splitting these longer trains these days would be much slower.

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