75 years ago today they dropped the bomb

 
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
75 years.

On the morning of Monday August 6, 1945, there wasn't a cloud in the sky over Hiroshima.

An air-raid warning had sounded a little after midnight, but nothing happened, and the all-clear was given at 2:10 a.m. Again at 7:09 in the morning, a yellow alert was issued, but the all-clear came at 7:31. People were relieved and, after a simple wartime breakfast, were beginning their day's work. Then, at 8:15 a.m., there was a flash of light in the sky.When the yellow alert was issued a little past seven o'clock, a B-29 had in fact appeared over Hiroshima to conduct a weather survey for dropping an atomic bomb. Nobody imagined such a thing was happening. It was a midsummer day and people in the city were starting to move about.



Approximately 8,400 mainly first and second year middle-school students (mostly twelve to fourteen-year old boys and girls) were about to help dismantle buildings to make firebreaks as protection from air raids. About 10,000 volunteer guards were coming from neighboring towns and villages into Hiroshima City to join them, and they were also arriving at their work sites. There were students who had been mobilized to work at military factories, and others who were ready for a day at school.

Akira Ishida, who would later work to promote peace education as a teacher and as a hibakusha (A-bomb survivor), was on a streetcar in the center of the city. Fumio Shigeto, who from this day on would work for the rescue activities of survivors and give them medical treatment at the Red Cross Hospital, had just arrived at Hiroshima Station. Ichiro Moritaki, who would dedicate the rest of his life to hibakusha relief movements, was at the Hiroshima Shipyard of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, in the south of the city where, together with his students at Hiroshima Higher School of Education, he had been mobilized as part of the labor force. The experience of the three, of whom only Ishida is still alive today, was in many ways typical of a large number of other hibakusha.

Although it was still wartime, another day had just started for people in Hiroshima. At 8:15 a.m., people were going to work, doing housework, going to receive rations, seeing the doctor, visiting sick friends or relatives, going to the bank to draw money out, or busy with other things.

http://www.hiroshimapeacemedia.jp/abom/97abom/peace/e/05/kinoko.htm

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  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
Messy end to a very messy war
  speedemon08 Mary

Location: I think by now you should have figured it out
Messy end to a very messy war
RTT_Rules
It could have been messier if the US had to land on foot. The estimated losses from a land based offensive were looking quite large, even though a lot of people in government at the time were cagey about using the bombs.
  Aaron The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: University of Adelaide SA
Bombs dropped by US B29s but they were nearly flown in by RAF Lancasters because as designed and in use even almost immediately prior to the bombings, the B29 could not carry either bomb. It was only eventually a US political aversion to ‘the Brits’ carrying the USA’s secret bomb to end the war saw the requisite mods to B29s undertaken.
  Mr. Lane Chief Commissioner

Bombs dropped by US B29s but they were nearly flown in by RAF Lancasters because as designed and in use even almost immediately prior to the bombings, the B29 could not carry either bomb. It was only eventually a US political aversion to ‘the Brits’ carrying the USA’s secret bomb to end the war saw the requisite mods to B29s undertaken.
Aaron
Been watching Mark Felton Productions?
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
I have actually been to the Smithonian (fantastic place) and encourage all to visit.

  Dangersdan707 Chief Commissioner

Location: On a Thing with Internet
Messy end to a very messy war
It could have been messier if the US had to land on foot. The estimated losses from a land based offensive were looking quite large, even though a lot of people in government at the time were cagey about using the bombs.
speedemon08
Its a 2 factor defeat, the nukes and the Soviet blitzkrieg through Manchuria.
  Aaron The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: University of Adelaide SA
Bombs dropped by US B29s but they were nearly flown in by RAF Lancasters because as designed and in use even almost immediately prior to the bombings, the B29 could not carry either bomb. It was only eventually a US political aversion to ‘the Brits’ carrying the USA’s secret bomb to end the war saw the requisite mods to B29s undertaken.
Been watching Mark Felton Productions?
Mr. Lane
No, what’s that? I don’t really watch much TV.
  Aaron The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: University of Adelaide SA
I have actually been to the Smithonian (fantastic place) and encourage all to visit.

bevans
Do the Smithsonian have a sign next to the Enola Gay saying they still think the Wright brothers weren’t the first to fly an aeroplane?
  Mr. Lane Chief Commissioner

Bombs dropped by US B29s but they were nearly flown in by RAF Lancasters because as designed and in use even almost immediately prior to the bombings, the B29 could not carry either bomb. It was only eventually a US political aversion to ‘the Brits’ carrying the USA’s secret bomb to end the war saw the requisite mods to B29s undertaken.
Been watching Mark Felton Productions?
No, what’s that? I don’t really watch much TV.
Aaron
Not TV, its a very popular YouTube channel. He put a video out about this very topic just the other day. Does anyone watch TV anymore?



https://youtu.be/5XX9ptCNpik
  GrahamH Chief Commissioner

Location: At a terminal on the www.
Bombs dropped by US B29s but they were nearly flown in by RAF Lancasters because as designed and in use even almost immediately prior to the bombings, the B29 could not carry either bomb. It was only eventually a US political aversion to ‘the Brits’ carrying the USA’s secret bomb to end the war saw the requisite mods to B29s undertaken.
Aaron
I read something about this decades ago, maybe while reading about what the dambuster squadron did for the rest of the war.
  nswtrains Chief Commissioner

Messy end to a very messy war
It could have been messier if the US had to land on foot. The estimated losses from a land based offensive were looking quite large, even though a lot of people in government at the time were cagey about using the bombs.
Its a 2 factor defeat, the nukes and the Soviet blitzkrieg through Manchuria.
Dangersdan707
I believe there were very few Japanese military personnel left alive after the Soviet blitzkrieg.
  Dangersdan707 Chief Commissioner

Location: On a Thing with Internet
Messy end to a very messy war
It could have been messier if the US had to land on foot. The estimated losses from a land based offensive were looking quite large, even though a lot of people in government at the time were cagey about using the bombs.
Its a 2 factor defeat, the nukes and the Soviet blitzkrieg through Manchuria.
I believe there were very few Japanese military personnel left alive after the Soviet blitzkrieg.
nswtrains
As they were very few in Manchuria to begin with in comparison to the soviet forces that were moved over from Europe. 600k captured seems like a fair lot no accounting for the ones who later died in labour camps.
  Groundrelay Chief Commissioner

Location: Surrounded by Trolls!
Messy end to a very messy war
It could have been messier if the US had to land on foot. The estimated losses from a land based offensive were looking quite large, even though a lot of people in government at the time were cagey about using the bombs.
speedemon08
Okinawa was a good indication of what an invasion of Japan would cost in lives on both sides. Unlike Hitler's Germans, the Japanese would most likely fight to the last man, woman and child. The A-bomb provided the shock factor which convinced the Emperor that continuing the war was futile.

It's also worth nothing that the B29 development cost was more expensive than the Manhattan Project. It was an amazing technological development and the beginning of US and USSR strategic bombers.

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