Adani changes to narrow gauge

 
  Sulla1 Chief Commissioner

Reports on social media suggest Aurizon has recently installed a "high speed" swingnose turnout at Newlands Junction for the Carmichael Rail Network (CRN). Newlands Junction is already the junction for the Newlands line and the GAP (Goonyella-Abbott Point) line, with the new branch exiting the Newlands System just north of the existing junction.

Track laying by Martinus is scheduled during 2021 using four ex-Kiwirail DC locomotives (Motive Power lists them as 4041, 4444, 4571 & 4692), ex-Kiwirail flat wagons and new 93-tonne ballast hoppers. DC 4444 is already in Brisbane at Martinus' Rocklea depot. Concrete sleepers are reportedly being stockpiled at the Carmichael mine site, so track construction appears likely to start there, working eastwards to Aurizon's Newlands System.

Bravus Mining and Resources (Adani's Australian subsidiary) is reporting the CRN will require 319,000 concrete sleepers, 27,000-tonnes of rail, 22 bridges and 460 culverts. New 60-tonne bridge girders produced by Rockhampton's Stresscrete are currently being roadhauled to bridge sites along the CRN.

The Bowen Rail Company's (Adani's Australian rail subsidiary) first four coal-hauling locomotives are due to arrive in the coming months too.

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  Sulla1 Chief Commissioner

Latest news. Martinus' ballast hoppers are currently being delivered by road from the Port of Mackay and tracklaying is underway...

https://www.railexpress.com.au/tracklaying-underway-on-carmichael-rail-network/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Further info and pics https://www.railpage.com.au/news/s/first-pics-of-bravus-carmichael-mine-rail-link

@Sulla1 wondering if the price includes telecommunications infrastructure being laid at the same time?
  Sulla1 Chief Commissioner

Further info and pics https://www.railpage.com.au/news/s/first-pics-of-bravus-carmichael-mine-rail-link

@Sulla1 wondering if the price includes telecommunications infrastructure being laid at the same time?
bevans


I believe Telstra is delivering the telecommunications infrastructure, but I don't recall any announcements regarding the signalling.
  M636C Minister for Railways

It appears that they have given up any ideas of standard gauge.

The concrete sleepers are narrow gauge only, unlike those laid on the upgraded track laid East of Geraldton W.A. towards the Iron Ore mines.

If they were still serious, the extra cost of dual gauge sleepers would be relativel small compared to the project costs.

Peter
  Sulla1 Chief Commissioner

It appears that they have given up any ideas of standard gauge.

The concrete sleepers are narrow gauge only, unlike those laid on the upgraded track laid East of Geraldton W.A. towards the Iron Ore mines.

If they were still serious, the extra cost of dual gauge sleepers would be relativel small compared to the project costs.

Peter
M636C

Adani's struggle to get this project off the drawing board is one where the cheapest option is the only option. The merits of standard gauge over narrow gauge have long since stopped being a consideration.

And on the face of the global zero emission race, the Carmichael Rail Network isn't likely to see out the design life of a concrete sleeper as it is.
  hbedriver Assistant Commissioner

Makes one wonder when/if the Adani mine will be “paused”.  China stopping imports of thermal coal, scores of loaded ships full of it floating around going nowhere; could Adani (or other power stations) pick up that coal at such a lower rate that no longer worthwhile building a new mine? International relationships and brutal business could render the mine surplus quite apart from green politics
  Sunbird Locomotive Fireman

Makes one wonder when/if the Adani mine will be “paused”.
hbedriver
There's no chance the mine will be paused.
It's all about geopolitics. India wants a secure supply of quality Australian coal for strategic security.
It maybe a dirty energy source but its still very effective and can always be used in an emergency.
However in the present situation there is no chance of the other proposed mines backed by Chinese interests going ahead.
Bravus is obviously hoping to make money hauling that coal to port so it will be reducing there return on investment.
  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales
Is there a date the mine will send its first train to port ?
  Lockspike Chief Commissioner

Makes one wonder when/if the Adani mine will be “paused”.
There's no chance the mine will be paused.
It's all about geopolitics. India wants a secure supply of quality Australian coal for strategic security.
It maybe a dirty energy source but its still very effective and can always be used in an emergency.
However in the present situation there is no chance of the other proposed mines backed by Chinese interests going ahead.
Bravus is obviously hoping to make money hauling that coal to port so it will be reducing there return on investment.
Sunbird
Agreed; Australia's links to India are only likely to strengthen. Despite lots of talk we are unlikely to start making most of what we consume, so will be looking to the likes of India and Indonesia as alternatives to our current major trading partner.
  Sunbird Locomotive Fireman

It appears that they have given up any ideas of standard gauge.

The concrete sleepers are narrow gauge only, unlike those laid on the upgraded track laid East of Geraldton W.A. towards the Iron Ore mines.

If they were still serious, the extra cost of dual gauge sleepers would be relativel small compared to the project costs.

Peter
M636C
I don't think standard guage was ever that important to Adani, it was just a benefit that came with building a whole new supply chain at the start.
When economics (and politics) meant they had to share the existing supply chain (and use a less efficient guage) then it was a case of "so be it".
Adani can still achieve their goal for an integrated supply chain, they just have to either build the missing link (they already have a preserved corridor) or get Aurizon to sell their section.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
Makes one wonder when/if the Adani mine will be “paused”.  China stopping imports of thermal coal, scores of loaded ships full of it floating around going nowhere; could Adani (or other power stations) pick up that coal at such a lower rate that no longer worthwhile building a new mine? International relationships and brutal business could render the mine surplus quite apart from green politics
hbedriver
Don't let the "China isn't taking our coal, coal mines will close" BS trick you into thinking we are exporting less coal and prices are dropping.

A few points to remember

- China bought 20% of Australian coal, if I recall ~80mtpa. You cannot just find 80mtpa of coal from somewhere else even over a few months.

- Any coal they are buying to off-set Australia coal is limited, mostly spot price from what ever stockpile is available and Australian coal will fill the gaps to non-Chinese buyers. In addition you can bet your bottom dollar the Chinese traders who buy the coal and currently doing swaps at sea.

- The spot price for thermal coal is rising from 5 year equal lows caused by CV-19.

- China won't let the loaded coal ships in its waters leave, read that to be, they want that coal.

- China is currently going through a series of power outages due to lack of coal, its hurting them far more than us.


China is very much on the back foot in this which is why they have selectively expanded the ban to other exports, but not all. They haven't banned LNP, uranium or iron ore. Even if China was to fully block all Australian imports, they will loose alot more than us, especially if Australia was to reciprocate.
  james.au Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney, NSW
Makes one wonder when/if the Adani mine will be “paused”.  China stopping imports of thermal coal, scores of loaded ships full of it floating around going nowhere; could Adani (or other power stations) pick up that coal at such a lower rate that no longer worthwhile building a new mine? International relationships and brutal business could render the mine surplus quite apart from green politics
Don't let the "China isn't taking our coal, coal mines will close" BS trick you into thinking we are exporting less coal and prices are dropping.

A few points to remember

- China bought 20% of Australian coal, if I recall ~80mtpa. You cannot just find 80mtpa of coal from somewhere else even over a few months.

- Any coal they are buying to off-set Australia coal is limited, mostly spot price from what ever stockpile is available and Australian coal will fill the gaps to non-Chinese buyers. In addition you can bet your bottom dollar the Chinese traders who buy the coal and currently doing swaps at sea.

- The spot price for thermal coal is rising from 5 year equal lows caused by CV-19.

- China won't let the loaded coal ships in its waters leave, read that to be, they want that coal.

- China is currently going through a series of power outages due to lack of coal, its hurting them far more than us.


China is very much on the back foot in this which is why they have selectively expanded the ban to other exports, but not all. They haven't banned LNP, uranium or iron ore. Even if China was to fully block all Australian imports, they will loose alot more than us, especially if Australia was to reciprocate.
RTT_Rules
Will be interesting to see what they do (or dont) to the wheat harvest.

What i dont understand is how China can step back from this and save face.  Because we are not going to be doing what they want in a hurry and kowtow....
  Sulla1 Chief Commissioner

Makes one wonder when/if the Adani mine will be “paused”.  China stopping imports of thermal coal, scores of loaded ships full of it floating around going nowhere; could Adani (or other power stations) pick up that coal at such a lower rate that no longer worthwhile building a new mine? International relationships and brutal business could render the mine surplus quite apart from green politics
Don't let the "China isn't taking our coal, coal mines will close" BS trick you into thinking we are exporting less coal and prices are dropping.

A few points to remember

- China bought 20% of Australian coal, if I recall ~80mtpa. You cannot just find 80mtpa of coal from somewhere else even over a few months.

- Any coal they are buying to off-set Australia coal is limited, mostly spot price from what ever stockpile is available and Australian coal will fill the gaps to non-Chinese buyers. In addition you can bet your bottom dollar the Chinese traders who buy the coal and currently doing swaps at sea.

- The spot price for thermal coal is rising from 5 year equal lows caused by CV-19.

- China won't let the loaded coal ships in its waters leave, read that to be, they want that coal.

- China is currently going through a series of power outages due to lack of coal, its hurting them far more than us.


China is very much on the back foot in this which is why they have selectively expanded the ban to other exports, but not all. They haven't banned LNP, uranium or iron ore. Even if China was to fully block all Australian imports, they will loose alot more than us, especially if Australia was to reciprocate.
Will be interesting to see what they do (or dont) to the wheat harvest.

What i dont understand is how China can step back from this and save face.  Because we are not going to be doing what they want in a hurry and kowtow....
james.au

Okay, this is going to read bit like the Game of Thrones...

China is playing the long game and won't be stepping back - Xi Jinping has begun moving geopolitical chess pieces in a match that hasn't been played in the Pacific since 1945.

There's a lot of moves, but China's goal is to become the sovereign and determing power across the Western Pacific Rim, filling the vacuum of a weakened United States too busy with its own internal strife - and achieving what its nemisis, Japan, couldn't in the 1930s and 1940s. Stifling Australia's economy will go a long way towards impacting Australia's military presence on the edge of China's and North Asia's primary oil shipping routes from the Middle East, and make other middling South East Asian economies think twice about pressing Chinese claims on their territories.

This is really only the beginning.

If Australia remains committed to an aliance with the United States and Japan, then China will work very hard to make Australia some sort of pariah state on the global stage - particularly to Arab oil states (Exhibit A - the Afghanistan SAS debacle). With zero strategic oil reserves - an oil embargo, blockade or sanctions could easily have most Australians eating lawn clippings within a month or two. This is a vulnerabilty that makes Australia a far easier target at this very moment in time than many of our immediate neighbours with oil and refining capacity.

And while we might expect reaction and intervention from the United States - you have to ask yourself, would a future US President with a hostile Senate, Congress or insular population really want to start a Pacific War over Australia, particularly if China succeeds at a global level with Operation Pariah State?

The good news is - for the interim at least - we should see a lot less rollingstock sourced from the Middle Kingdom.
  jmt Deputy Commissioner

RTT_Rules

"China is very much on the back foot in this which is why they have selectively expanded the ban to other exports, but not all. They haven't banned LNP, uranium or iron ore. Even if China was to fully block all Australian imports, they will loose alot more than us, especially if Australia was to reciprocate."


Why aren't we putting a levy on LNP, uranium or iron ore exported to China?

Say 1% to start with, then ratchet it up by 1% for every Australian import that China bans.

China currently has less than 100 million tons of iron ore in port stockpiles, the lowest level in several years.

Australia could cripple the Chinese steel industry within 2 to 3 months, should China stop importing rather than pay the levy. There is currently no other source for high grade ore that China can access (60% of their iron ore imports). I can't see the politburo trashing their steel industry, and post Chicom Pox recovery, to save face. With reference to Commos, Richard Nixon once famously stated, "when you have them by the balls, their hearts and minds will follow". Australia could easily have China by the balls.
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
The rail delivery side of the project seems to be barrelling along



Rolling stock

https://www.martinusrail.com.au/expertise/plant-and-equipment/
  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales
Can we assume the laying of rail will begin from the QR end and not the mine meaning an interim rail yard is required in the QR network.
  Sulla1 Chief Commissioner

The Carmichael Rail Network does not connect with the QR network. It connects with the Aurizon network at Newlands Junction. A turnout for the new line is in place.

As far as I know most rail and sleeper stockpiles, plus the track welding plant, are at the Carmichael mine where Bowen Rail's yard and maintenance facilities will be located.

Track laying is most likely to start at the mine yard and progress the 189km eastwards to the Aurizon network junction.
  jmt Deputy Commissioner

From photos on a NZ Facebook site, posted today, Martinus 4041/4692, and a number of ex Kiwi flat wagons stacked in Chalmers yard, Port of Brisbane.
  Big J Deputy Commissioner

Location: In Paradise
Makes one wonder when/if the Adani mine will be “paused”.  China stopping imports of thermal coal, scores of loaded ships full of it floating around going nowhere; could Adani (or other power stations) pick up that coal at such a lower rate that no longer worthwhile building a new mine? International relationships and brutal business could render the mine surplus quite apart from green politics
hbedriver
Really?

If anything, China's chest beating will encourage the India to seek more coal in response, to the perceived threat of China's intentions becoming the world's largest economy. India wants to be in a position to look after its own sovereignty and needs resources to grow its own economy.

You might find, China may cool off other coal projects, but Adani is here now. Remember Adani is all about vertical integration and doesn't want to risk access reliability or market exposure to other suppliers.

Not disagreeing that Coal mining is declining due to thermal demand waning, but this specific project will proceed.
  GT46C-ACe Assistant Commissioner

Location: Gold Coast QLD
And the coal from Carmichael will still be cheaper on paper as Adani owns the whole supply chain.
  jmt Deputy Commissioner

Should Adani purchase Cape guage locomotives in India, this may be a guide to shape.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xe7AndY4A_g

Broadguage Alco frame with Cape gauge trimounts.

12-710 (Indian fabricated crankcase) with AC traction.
Clip of Mrs. Big with her fawning sycophants inspecting engine production.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iwMV2W7tBjw.

I guess that with a 16-710 would be a bit longer.

Built at BLW (successor to DLW) at Varanasi.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banaras_Locomotive_Works
Sold to Mozambique by RITES, the quango with the monopoly for flogging rail paraphernalia produced by organs controlled by Indian Railways.

Deal was won by soft finance from the Indian Government. Tenders for the locomotives was issued by the Export-Import Bank of India https://www.eximbankindia.in/Assets/Dynamic/PDF/LOCTenders/Hindi/1325LOCTenders.pdf

Strange situation, Bombardier India hold the license for the fabrication of EMD locos for export, with the license held by the Government (exercised by BLW), theoretically for their own use. BLW the successor to DLW, has built over 2900 units under the EMD license, a number that does not seem to be added into EMD totals, and ignored by GE freaks.
  GT46C-ACe Assistant Commissioner

Location: Gold Coast QLD
What does the quasi-xeno hate and commentary on foreign politics have to do with locomotives? Oh yeah, it's another post by Mr Turner ????‍♂️
  Sulla1 Chief Commissioner

Ex-Kiwirail DC's 4444 & 4571, now owned by Martinus, are currently being roadhauled north from Brisbane to begin tracklaying on the Carmichael Rail Network. Additional Martinus tracklaying equipment and rollingstock has been moved from Brisbane and Mackay by road over the last couple of weeks.

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