Passenger trains between Finland and Sweden moves a step closer

 

News article: Passenger trains between Finland and Sweden moves a step closer

Cross-border passenger trains between Finland and Sweden have moved a step closer.

  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
When I first read this I was not even aware there was not a passenger service between the countries.  29 years later it has happened.

Passenger trains between Finland and Sweden moves a step closer

Sponsored advertisement

  james.au Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney, NSW
Well, considering the population in the north of both conuntries is way lower than the southern sections, i can see why a rail connection has taken so long.  The ferry services are much more effective, with a ferry from Turku-Stockholm taking a day, the train up to the north and back down again would be double that at least.

And we talk about trains being better than buses, the ferries on that route are streets ahead of trains.  You get your own berth, buffet meals, and all sorts of goodies if you get the right ticket.
  duttonbay Minister for Railways

Well, considering the population in the north of both conuntries is way lower than the southern sections, i can see why a rail connection has taken so long.  The ferry services are much more effective, with a ferry from Turku-Stockholm taking a day, the train up to the north and back down again would be double that at least.

And we talk about trains being better than buses, the ferries on that route are streets ahead of trains.  You get your own berth, buffet meals, and all sorts of goodies if you get the right ticket.
james.au
Very true. Mind you there was a passenger link from maybe 1920 through to 1988. Had to change trains due to the different gauges. Is there any mention of the different gauge in any press release about this?

As well as berths (in cabins), meals, etc, the overnight ferry to Stockholm offers a simply stunning view of the Stockholm Archipelago.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
Well, considering the population in the north of both conuntries is way lower than the southern sections, i can see why a rail connection has taken so long.  The ferry services are much more effective, with a ferry from Turku-Stockholm taking a day, the train up to the north and back down again would be double that at least.

And we talk about trains being better than buses, the ferries on that route are streets ahead of trains.  You get your own berth, buffet meals, and all sorts of goodies if you get the right ticket.
james.au
1800 km by train or 350 km by ferry capital to capital is a no brainer which is faster.

Fun fact, the Baltic Sea section between the two countries is one of the few places  in the world the sea level is falling, or rather the land rising.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Well, considering the population in the north of both conuntries is way lower than the southern sections, i can see why a rail connection has taken so long.  The ferry services are much more effective, with a ferry from Turku-Stockholm taking a day, the train up to the north and back down again would be double that at least.

And we talk about trains being better than buses, the ferries on that route are streets ahead of trains.  You get your own berth, buffet meals, and all sorts of goodies if you get the right ticket.
Very true. Mind you there was a passenger link from maybe 1920 through to 1988. Had to change trains due to the different gauges. Is there any mention of the different gauge in any press release about this?

As well as berths (in cabins), meals, etc, the overnight ferry to Stockholm offers a simply stunning view of the Stockholm Archipelago.
duttonbay
'As well as berths (in cabins), meals, etc, the overnight ferry to Stockholm offers a simply stunning view of the Stockholm Archipelago.'

A fabulous ferry trip especially in Summer with almost 20 hours of daylight.

Lapland and the North of Norway are beautiful places and not to be missed if anyone ever gets the chance to travel again.
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Well, considering the population in the north of both conuntries is way lower than the southern sections, i can see why a rail connection has taken so long.  The ferry services are much more effective, with a ferry from Turku-Stockholm taking a day, the train up to the north and back down again would be double that at least.

And we talk about trains being better than buses, the ferries on that route are streets ahead of trains.  You get your own berth, buffet meals, and all sorts of goodies if you get the right ticket.
james.au

James that sounds like a great trip.  Do you have a link to an internet page for this ferry service?
  apw5910 Deputy Commissioner

Location: Location: Location.
Well, considering the population in the north of both conuntries is way lower than the southern sections, i can see why a rail connection has taken so long.  The ferry services are much more effective, with a ferry from Turku-Stockholm taking a day, the train up to the north and back down again would be double that at least.

And we talk about trains being better than buses, the ferries on that route are streets ahead of trains.  You get your own berth, buffet meals, and all sorts of goodies if you get the right ticket.

James that sounds like a great trip.  Do you have a link to an internet page for this ferry service?
bevans
https://www.sales.vikingline.com/destinations/

Did Stockholm-Turku in 2019. Had the 50 euro pp seafood feast in the restaurant, watching the archipelago slip by. Paid the extra 6 euros to get a berth with a real window (the inner ones only have a picture of a porthole). But "vin ordinaire" Yellowtail was 38 euros a bottle in duty free!
  james.au Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney, NSW
Well, considering the population in the north of both conuntries is way lower than the southern sections, i can see why a rail connection has taken so long.  The ferry services are much more effective, with a ferry from Turku-Stockholm taking a day, the train up to the north and back down again would be double that at least.

And we talk about trains being better than buses, the ferries on that route are streets ahead of trains.  You get your own berth, buffet meals, and all sorts of goodies if you get the right ticket.

James that sounds like a great trip.  Do you have a link to an internet page for this ferry service?
bevans
https://www.tallinksilja.com/stockholm-turku

This is the one i did.

It was really great too.  I came down on the train from Rovienami, and the connection time was a little tight.  The train was running late, and because i had added a comment to my ticket that I was coming down on the train when i booked it, they were expecting me.  They held the ferry for about 10 mins for me (and only me!), but it was conditional on me running as fast as i could between the station and the ferry terminal (about 800m, but i had bags haha).

Ive recently watched the Swedish (ie original) trilogy of 'The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo' and am currently thinking of a Scandinavia/Northern Germany trip for as soon as possible!
  Nightfire Minister for Railways

Location: Gippsland
An Interesting error In this news article  

  "the two Scandinavian neighbours"

Only 3 Countries make up Scandinavia, Finland ain't one of them.
  Brianr Assistant Commissioner

Location: Dunedin, New Zealand
I visited Finland in 2008. I stayed with friends in Helsinki but arrived by overnight ferry from Stockholm. I agree a marvellous trip. I travelled  through the Stockholm archipelago twice as I had earlier arrived on a ferry from Riga, Latvia. While staying in Helsinki, i made a several trips, one by train to Rovaniemi. Up in the day train and back in a sleeper. My friends took me by car for a weekend to their family home in the east on a lake near the Russian border. I travelled by ferry to Tallinn, Estonia for a few nights. I left by yet another ferry to Rostock (Germany).
I would gladly return if I could take a train up to the north of Finland then across to Sweden. I only fly if no other choice.
Yes, Finland is not strictly part of Scandinavia, however it was part of the Swedish kingdom for 100s of years. In Helsinki eg the metro, signs are in Finnish and Swedish. I found this very helpful as Swedish is similar to German which I speak (poorly now).
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
I visited Finland in 2008. I stayed with friends in Helsinki but arrived by overnight ferry from Stockholm. I agree a marvellous trip. I travelled  through the Stockholm archipelago twice as I had earlier arrived on a ferry from Riga, Latvia. While staying in Helsinki, i made a several trips, one by train to Rovaniemi. Up in the day train and back in a sleeper. My friends took me by car for a weekend to their family home in the east on a lake near the Russian border. I travelled by ferry to Tallinn, Estonia for a few nights. I left by yet another ferry to Rostock (Germany).
I would gladly return if I could take a train up to the north of Finland then across to Sweden. I only fly if no other choice.
Yes, Finland is not strictly part of Scandinavia, however it was part of the Swedish kingdom for 100s of years. In Helsinki eg the metro, signs are in Finnish and Swedish. I found this very helpful as Swedish is similar to German which I speak (poorly now).
Brianr
Sounds great.

We had our our trip to Rovemini 3 years back for Xmas and if people are wondering why is this mentioned so much its because its on the Artic Circle and is basically the home of everything Xmas. If you have young kids, GO!!! it will be the best family holiday ever. I arrived with the flu on 23rd and 24th was hard the drive to Sanata's village my nose was a tap. But outside in sub zero temp's I was 100% fine, I just couldn't stand inside waiting with small child for Sanata photo, but mum took care of that. Even the Finair airline hostess was peeking out the window on landing at 9pm at night saying she loved this part of Finland. We met a NZ family there with 2 kids spending 4 weeks in Finland.

We flew there from a few days in Istanbul (departing from Dubai). Didn't have time for the train, but would have been my first choice. 4 days renting a house at the end of a cul-de-sac. On arrival -22C.  3 layers of clothing, scarf, gloves and beanie and you are good to go. We walked for 2-4h every morning through the forest paths. Driving on frozen roads with winter tyres piece of pi$$. its amazing how quiet road traffic is when road is covered in snow and ice and everything around.

Most Fin's speak 3 - 5 languages fluently with 3 and 4 lingual on most govt things. English, Fin, Swed, Russian and/or German. You will find many places have Fin, Eng, German as standard.

We went for a EV snow mobile trip through the forest, amazing and once you do it you will never get on a petrol powered snow mobile again and one of the reasons I so pro EV for cars as once people realise the silence, they will be calling for Petrol cars to be banned.

We flew back to Helsinki for a few days then Ferry to Tallinn for NY. In hindsight we should have caught the train but it costs more considering we had to fly there from Helsinki and a 3 week trip with a family of 4 including Germany was already adding up.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Well worth a visit.

https://santaclausvillage.info/
  duttonbay Minister for Railways

We too visited Rovaniemi during our time in Finland. In our case we travelled on the Hurtigruten from Bergen (Norway) to Kirkense in the far north-east of Norway, only 5km from the Russian border. From there we took a minibus transfer to the town of Inari. After a night at the Hotel Kultahovi, stunningly located on the banks of a river, where it passed through a set of rapids, we used a regular bus for the journey to Rovaniemi. We had reserved seats, which turned out to seats 1 & 2 front-row, offering a wonderful view as he headed south.  After a couple of nights at Rovaniemi we went by the day train to Helsinki.

We had four nights there, and then took a tram to the ferry terminal, for the short two-hour ferry trip to Tallinn. This is essentially a floating duty-free shop, and people were buying vast quantities of alcohol (the shop also sold folding trolleys to move the booze).

From Tallinn it was a private driver to Cesis, overnnight, ande another private driver to Riga. Riga to Stockholm was overnight ferry.

The Baltic is a very busy shipping lane, with multiple ferry companies operating many routes. The scene below is not the best view of the Stockholm archipelago, but shows our ferry following two others towards the destination. There was at least one a similar distance astern of us. There seem to be services linking all of the capital cities, and it is no wonder that the passenger train service between Sweden and Finland ended many years ago. The overnight ferries are more convenient and comfortable than a normal sleeper in a train.

https://flic.kr/p/2kSbFY1
  Brianr Assistant Commissioner

Location: Dunedin, New Zealand
I was a bit embarrassed to say that I visited Santa in Rovaniemi and (aged 64) had my photo taken with him. I did not sit on his lap but had a nice chat. It was May so not cold but the sun only set for a few hours. At the time, having lived all my life in Sydney, it was amazing. Two years later (2010) I did the Hurtigruten cruise to the top of Norway both ways in August and then in 2017 I was in Fairbanks, Alaska on June 22 so have now become more use to midnight sun. As I have now lived in Dunedin for 11 years, I am accustomed to going to bed while still light in January.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
I was a bit embarrassed to say that I visited Santa in Rovaniemi and (aged 64) had my photo taken with him. I did not sit on his lap but had a nice chat. It was May so not cold but the sun only set for a few hours. At the time, having lived all my life in Sydney, it was amazing. Two years later (2010) I did the Hurtigruten cruise to the top of Norway both ways in August and then in 2017 I was in Fairbanks, Alaska on June 22 so have now become more use to midnight sun. As I have now lived in Dunedin for 11 years, I am accustomed to going to bed while still light in January.
Brianr
Nice
  62440 Chief Commissioner

A long time ago, I took the train from Manchester to Oslo via Copenhagen where I arrived to see a steam train ready to go, I changed plans and spent the day behind steam before heading to Oslo, then the north line across the Arctic Circle to Bodo before taking the bus to Narvik and train round the Baltic via Boden and Haparranda with change of gauge to Kemi. I was actually heading to the Russian border but had my wallet pinched on the way to Helsinki. I reported this to the police and had a ride around Helsinki in a police car looking for someone who could speak English before getting back to the station with enough money to buy a ticket to Hook via the ferry from Turku. Waiting for the tram to the harbour in Turku, I noticed there were banknotes blowing a long the street and picked up enough to get a berth and a feed on the ferry to Stockholm as well as a ticket to Manchester from Hook, arriving with not enough for the all night bus and waiting for the first train. 40 years later, I took the train via Stockholm and Turkeu this time I could cross into Russia on my way to Hong Kong by train via Asgabat.
  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales
62440 what a wonderful story. I would
Like to hear the next instalment please.

Many may not remember Finland was a part of Russia and after independence and during the Soviet era was one of the only places Russians could travel to from the Soviet Union.

I am curious as to how freight moves between Finland and Sweden with the different gauges ?

Sponsored advertisement

Subscribers: bevans, Nightfire, RTT_Rules

Display from: