The Aussie political economy -

 
  davesvline Chief Commissioner

Location: 1983-1998
Poor Jacqui..........

Pretty sure the colleagues in the organisation she used to serve in would have said  “eat a ....” in response to her tirade, as that certainly doesn’t look like humble pie. Embarassed


Regards

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  DirtyBallast Chief Commissioner

Location: I was here first. You're only visiting.
^ Let he or she, who has never chucked a wobbly, cast the first stone etc.
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
^ Let he or she, who has never chucked a wobbly, cast the first stone etc.
DirtyBallast
Yeah I frequently swear and abuse people because I won't get let into the Chairman's Lounge and the free booze within.

Acting VIC Premier James Merlino has taken aim at the Commonwealth for not providing more free money during the latest lockdown - ABC News;

Mr Merlino and Treasurer Tim Pallas also used this morning's announcement to slam the federal government over what they said was a lack of support, saying "Victorian workers deserve more".

"We asked multiple times [for] the federal government to support workers during this period, and the unrelenting answer has been no," Mr Merlino said.

"Victorian workers deserve more from the federal government, and I am beyond disappointed that the answer from the Prime Minister and from the Treasurer has been not to talk in further detail about the package.

"For the Prime Minister and the federal Treasurer to say 'no' is a disgrace and it should make every Victorian angry."

Treasurer Tim Pallas went further, saying he would "not be as reserved in his language" as the Premier.

"What we needed was the Commonwealth to make at least a comparable offer of support to working people," he said.

"Empathy means nothing unless your words are matched by tangibles.

"I am angry, and I'm disappointed — disappointed because the language talks about a partnership, but delivers nothing in real terms for the people who need it most."

Mr Pallas said the Commonwealth had agreed not to tax the payments the Victorian government would be offering to businesses.

So the Victorian government is disappointed that the rivers of free money have dried up? Too bad. Victoria has already consumed the bulk of the welfare given out by the Commonwealth during the first 12 months of this thing and they want more - as a Commonwealth taxpayer I say "no".

This situation with lock-downs will not go away - it's the new normal inflicted on us by governments who insist that the virus shouldn't be allowed in the Australian community. That collateral damage can't be compensated by future taxpayers forever, we simply can't borrow enough to prevent everyone from losing their jobs - this is the new 'normal' (vaccines will not change that reality) so we'd all better get used to it.
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Richmond Vic
Mr Merlino and Treasurer Tim Pallas also used this morning's announcement to slam the federal government over what they said was a lack of support, saying "Victorian workers deserve more".

"We asked multiple times [for] the federal government to support workers during this period, and the unrelenting answer has been no," Mr Merlino said.

"Victorian workers deserve more from the federal government, and I am beyond disappointed that the answer from the Prime Minister and from the Treasurer has been not to talk in further detail about the package.

"For the Prime Minister and the federal Treasurer to say 'no' is a disgrace and it should make every Victorian angry."

Treasurer Tim Pallas went further, saying he would "not be as reserved in his language" as the Premier.

"What we needed was the Commonwealth to make at least a comparable offer of support to working people," he said.

"Empathy means nothing unless your words are matched by tangibles.

"I am angry, and I'm disappointed — disappointed because the language talks about a partnership, but delivers nothing in real terms for the people who need it most."

Mr Pallas said the Commonwealth had agreed not to tax the payments the Victorian government would be offering to businesses.
don_dunstan
A very selective piece of quoting. I watched the presser, and what has been left out is the bit about the Commonwealth repeatedly saying that it wants to work hand in glove with Victoria, and then, when the crunch comes, abandoning any such pretence and walking away.
And; before Don starts rabbiting on again, I am not arguing the rights or wrongs, I am merely filling in what was actually said.
  wobert Chief Commissioner

Location: Half way between Propodolla and Kinimakatka
Well Don, we Victorians will keep all our GST money and you can go back to living in your yurt.
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
Well Don, we Victorians will keep all our GST money and you can go back to living in your yurt.
wobert
Umm, could be wrong but I think that's everyone else's money that's supporting Victoria right now, wobert. And during the 'second wave' definitely so.
  wobert Chief Commissioner

Location: Half way between Propodolla and Kinimakatka
What just happened in Victoria wasn't Victorias fault, and could have happened in any state. It was a failure of quarantine, imagine if it happened in NSW. The Feds own this, they have been told for over 9 months what needed to be done
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-10-24/coronavirus-hotel-quarantine-review-covid19/12810486
  wobert Chief Commissioner

Location: Half way between Propodolla and Kinimakatka
Well Don, we Victorians will keep all our GST money and you can go back to living in your yurt.
Umm, could be wrong but I think that's everyone else's money that's supporting Victoria right now, wobert. And during the 'second wave' definitely so.
don_dunstan
Well you are wrong, the Feds aren't giving the Victorian Government anything.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
Well Don, we Victorians will keep all our GST money and you can go back to living in your yurt.
Umm, could be wrong but I think that's everyone else's money that's supporting Victoria right now, wobert. And during the 'second wave' definitely so.
Well you are wrong, the Feds aren't giving the Victorian Government anything.
wobert
Would you? After all the Gold Standard shouldn't need anything.
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
The Morrison government has reneged and given Victorian workers who can prove loss of income a special $500 a week payment - News.com.au;

Melburnians will have to prove they have less than $10,000 in liquid assets and have “insufficient” leave entitlements to receive a new $500 Covid-lockdown emergency payment.

Victoria was plunged into lockdown over a week ago to crush an escalating Covid outbreak, a measure that was extended earlier this week.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Thursday confirmed people in hot spots would be eligible for weekly emergency payments to help them through the crisis.

People living in hot spots aged over 17 who ordinarily worked 20 hours a week will receive $500 a week, while those who worked less 20 hours would receive $325.

“They will be able to do this from Tuesday in making an application online with Services Australia, and they will also be a number they can contact. There will be further information provided about that,” Mr Morrison said.

To be eligible, applicants must declare would have worked were it not from the lockdown, and have lost income as result.

They must report less than $10,000 in liquid assets, and have “insufficient” leave entitlements, including special pandemic and sick leave.

Also interesting to note an update to ABS wages and incomes statistics updated recently with some pretty grim charts including this one:


Australian workers, particularly in the private sector, are seeing their wages eroded to quite a significant extent - lucky there's no inflation (for now).
  wobert Chief Commissioner

Location: Half way between Propodolla and Kinimakatka
Well Don, we Victorians will keep all our GST money and you can go back to living in your yurt.
Umm, could be wrong but I think that's everyone else's money that's supporting Victoria right now, wobert. And during the 'second wave' definitely so.
Well you are wrong, the Feds aren't giving the Victorian Government anything.
Would you? After all the Gold Standard shouldn't need anything.
RTT_Rules
You have no idea of what's going on in this country, and especially Victoria.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
Well Don, we Victorians will keep all our GST money and you can go back to living in your yurt.
Umm, could be wrong but I think that's everyone else's money that's supporting Victoria right now, wobert. And during the 'second wave' definitely so.
Well you are wrong, the Feds aren't giving the Victorian Government anything.
Would you? After all the Gold Standard shouldn't need anything.
You have no idea of what's going on in this country, and especially Victoria.
wobert
Now you're sounding like Don.
  Groundrelay Chief Commissioner

Location: Surrounded by Trolls!
Australian workers, particularly in the private sector, are seeing their wages eroded to quite a significant extent - lucky there's no inflation (for now).
don_dunstan
To be fair, the Reserve Bank is trying to increase inflation.
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
Australian workers, particularly in the private sector, are seeing their wages eroded to quite a significant extent - lucky there's no inflation (for now).
To be fair, the Reserve Bank is trying to increase inflation.
Groundrelay
If there was an actual demand for labour then you'd see wage inflation, but then they try and work actively against that by having the largest mass migration program in the OECD. That's been ameliorated somewhat by COVID19 but then the universities are desperately trying to import more visa seeking 'students' and farmers crying out for 'skilled' fruit-pickers then its not going to last.

There was an ABC article accompanying that chart I posted earlier and the union movement were trying to say that wage increases need to be legislated - their preference is for 3 or more percent in one hit. That will kill jobs - nothing is more certain - along with the increase in the super guarantee. The increases in wages need to be organic through increasing the demand for labour - otherwise its cart before the horse.

Incidentally there's a huge chasm between public and private, depending on which branch and which state you work in. Victorian public servants have done the best of all (surprise, surprise) with the wages bill for the public servants in VIC has grown 22.3% since 2015 and next year its set to grow a whopping 10% in 12 months. Public servants are not feeling the pain that workers in the private sector are, that's for sure.
  doyle Chief Commissioner

Cuts to Medicare July 1st
  michaelgm Chief Commissioner

Cuts to Medicare July 1st
doyle
Never seen hunts maiden speech before.
Just the beginning of the end for Medicare?

  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-06-11/workers-wages-superannuation-guarantee-rise-employers-budget/100206954


Superannuation rises could come at the cost of wages — workers may end up paying for their own super rise

Shock horror, where did they think the money was coming from? Where did they think it came from last time?

Do they think employers have the financial ability to just add another few percent to their employ Gross wage bill?

Compulsory Super is about forcing self funded savings for retirement and provide a standard of living in retirement that is linked to your life-time earnings, rather than the more socialistic minimum standard one size fits all OAP scheme that will in time be phased out or at least replaced that we have known for last 60 odd years. However it was always going to be a 40 - 50 year transition period and the longer they take to force it up to around 25-35% the longer it was take for the transition to be complete.
  justarider Chief Commissioner

Location: Released again, maybe for the last time??
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-06-11/workers-wages-superannuation-guarantee-rise-employers-budget/100206954


Superannuation rises could come at the cost of wages — workers may end up paying for their own super rise

Shock horror, where did they think the money was coming from? Where did they think it came from last time?

Do they think employers have the financial ability to just add another few percent to their employ Gross wage bill?

Compulsory Super is about forcing self funded savings for retirement and provide a standard of living in retirement that is linked to your life-time earnings, rather than the more socialistic minimum standard one size fits all OAP scheme that will in time be phased out or at least replaced that we have known for last 60 odd years. However it was always going to be a 40 - 50 year transition period and the longer they take to force it up to around 25-35% the longer it was take for the transition to be complete.
RTT_Rules
shock horror,
we are now into the 30th year of the transition, and another 5 years until we get to 12.5% (half the low end of your preferred number).

All the time the LNP/IPA have to be dragged kicking and screaming.

Employers not have the capacity.
Same BS excuse for not paying workers a rise for a decade, assuming they didn't find a sneaky loophole to reduce/steal.
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
Have to agree with RTT_Rules on this one, it hobbles Australia's ability to compete head-to-head with Asia like Keating said we were supposed to do.

"Oh you have to compete with Asia but here's a surcharge on top of all the other costs of doing business in this country that you have to pay".

Just watching Albanese on TV doing a puff-piece for the news at his favorite rugby league club. Who cares what you think mate, you don't matter.
  DirtyBallast Chief Commissioner

Location: I was here first. You're only visiting.
Have to agree with RTT_Rules on this one, it hobbles Australia's ability to compete head-to-head with Asia like Keating said we were supposed to do.

"Oh you have to compete with Asia but here's a surcharge on top of all the other costs of doing business in this country that you have to pay".

Just watching Albanese on TV doing a puff-piece for the news at his favorite rugby league club. Who cares what you think mate, you don't matter.
don_dunstan
Yeah, superannuation hobbles the economy, just like your NDIS payments do.

Albanese can't hold a candle to Morrison insisting that lockdown needed to be delayed until after he could get the chance to drink piss watching the Sharks last year.
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
Have to agree with RTT_Rules on this one, it hobbles Australia's ability to compete head-to-head with Asia like Keating said we were supposed to do.

"Oh you have to compete with Asia but here's a surcharge on top of all the other costs of doing business in this country that you have to pay".

Just watching Albanese on TV doing a puff-piece for the news at his favorite rugby league club. Who cares what you think mate, you don't matter.
Yeah, superannuation hobbles the economy, just like your NDIS payments do.

Albanese can't hold a candle to Morrison insisting that lockdown needed to be delayed until after he could get the chance to drink piss watching the Sharks last year.
DirtyBallast
NDIS will turn out to be unsustainable in its current form. Why do the parents of an autistic kiddie need gardening services delivered by the taxpayer?
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
Peter Dutton is set to announce the scrapping of the Attack Class project to be replaced by a program to refurbish the Collins Class and make them viable for at least another ten years. From Reuters:

Australia will refurbish its ageing Collins-class submarine fleet, The Australian newspaper reported on Friday, as doubts over Canberra’s A$50 billion ($38.8 billion) deal for 12 new submarines built by French shipbuilder Naval Group grow.

Australia in 2016 selected Naval Group to build a new submarine fleet to replace its more than two-decades-old Collins submarines and significantly expand its military to protect strategic and trade interests in the Asia-Pacific.

The deal, one of the world's most lucrative defence deals, has been beset by issues and delays due to Canberra's requirement that the majority of the manufacturing and components be sourced locally.

As a result, Australian defence officials to last month said they were undertaking "contingency planning".

Casting further doubt over the deal with Naval Group, The Australian reported the Minister for Defence Peter Dutton will order a refit of existing Collins-class submarines.

"Clearly there have been problems with the arrangements with Naval Group,” Dutton told The Australian.

"There has been concern on both sides in relation to the programme and I need to make sure that we have the best capacity available to us."

The French initially agreed to manufacture 60% of the content on-shore in Australia but this has steadily fallen to the point where they're now refusing to make even ten percent of the fit-out here in Australia preferring instead to use existing suppliers in Europe and fully import almost all of the content into Australia. This is in clear breach of their commitment to the Australian government at the signing of the contract.

Not sure what sort of technology will be used to update the Collins Class but given the situation with China appears to be escalating perhaps we're better off using what we have rather than waiting ten years for the first Attack Class to get delivered.
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
Author Bruce Pascoe's 2014 book "Dark Emu" has been torn to shreds by a leading anthropologist and an archeologist in an upcoming book to be released this week by Melbourne University Press - News.com.au;

An influential Australian bestseller that painted a radically different view of Aboriginal history prior to colonisation has been “debunked” in a “damning” new book by two respected academics...

...Now two leading experts – anthropologist Peter Sutton and archaeologist Keryn Walshe – have taken aim at Pascoe in a new book, Farmers or Hunter-Gatherers? The Dark Emu Debate, set to be released by Melbourne University Press next week.

Author and journalist Stuart Rintoul, writing in The Sydney Morning Herald’s Good Weekend magazine on Saturday, described their rebuttal to Dark Emu as “damning”.

“In page after page, Sutton and Walshe accuse Pascoe of a ‘lack of true scholarship’, ignoring Aboriginal voices, dragging respect for traditional Aboriginal culture back into the Eurocentric world of the colonial era, and ‘trimming’ colonial observations to fit his argument,” Rintoul writes.

“They write that while Dark Emu ‘purports to be factual’ it is ‘littered with unsourced material, is poorly researched, distorts and exaggerates many points, selectively emphasises evidence to suit those opinions, and ignores large bodies of information that do not support the author’s opinions’.”

Dr Walshe, meanwhile, said that when she first tried to read Dark Emu, she was so frustrated by its lack of scholarship that she didn’t finish it.

“I still struggle to believe that this has happened,” she told Good Weekend.

In a written response, Pascoe told the magazine that his book had “encouraged many Australians to recognise the ingenuity and sophistication of the many Aboriginal cultures, societies and land-management practices, which had not previously been brought to mainstream attention”.

I've read explorer Charles Sturt's diaries upon which Pascoe has based much of "Dark Emu" and there's no evidence whatsoever for Pascoe's claims that Sturt observed 'farming', 'permanent settlements of 1,000 people' and 'engineered reservoirs'. Particularly damning are Pascoe's claims that Sturt saw evidence of keeping animals for stock - which animals? How did they keep them penned up to stop them roaming? Makes no sense.

Really what Pascoe has done is culturally appropriate someone else's history for his own benefit without a shred of evidence backing up what he's said. And yet the book was distributed to schools as if it were fact.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
Have to agree with RTT_Rules on this one, it hobbles Australia's ability to compete head-to-head with Asia like Keating said we were supposed to do.

"Oh you have to compete with Asia but here's a surcharge on top of all the other costs of doing business in this country that you have to pay".

Just watching Albanese on TV doing a puff-piece for the news at his favorite rugby league club. Who cares what you think mate, you don't matter.
Yeah, superannuation hobbles the economy, just like your NDIS payments do.

Albanese can't hold a candle to Morrison insisting that lockdown needed to be delayed until after he could get the chance to drink piss watching the Sharks last year.
DirtyBallast
Always interesting to see views of people who think companies have capacity to just keep handing money over to employees without having longterm impacts on number employees, business viability, costs etc.

My old employer site in Australia had under $1B of income with a total wage bill pushing $200m.  The up coming 0.5% increase is $1m. Where do people think this $1m will come from? If we go back to mid 90's then this is $18m, where did they think this came from?

In the 90's many companies covered the cost of Super by advertising new roles as "Salary Package", ie Super came from the offered package, ie employee paid. For existing white collar roles future pay rises were basically factored to include the cost of Super and for wage roles this was factored into future wage rises.  

I've said it before I'm a strong supporter of SUPER and yes it needs to be increased to 25% by 2025, rising 1% per year. SUPER is needed, its a fairer system than the existing OAP scheme which needs to be wound up by the time Gen Y's get to retirement, if not before with a safety net put in for the small numbers who don't have sufficient SUPER. However its the Employees compulsory saving scheme funded mostly by the employees themselves and lets not pretend otherwise.

The main contribution of SUPER to the economy is the huge piles of cash that are now available for investment and the jobs they support. However if they simply drive industry off-shore to avoid funding SUPER, then its pointless.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
Have to agree with RTT_Rules on this one, it hobbles Australia's ability to compete head-to-head with Asia like Keating said we were supposed to do.

"Oh you have to compete with Asia but here's a surcharge on top of all the other costs of doing business in this country that you have to pay".

Just watching Albanese on TV doing a puff-piece for the news at his favorite rugby league club. Who cares what you think mate, you don't matter.
Yeah, superannuation hobbles the economy, just like your NDIS payments do.

Albanese can't hold a candle to Morrison insisting that lockdown needed to be delayed until after he could get the chance to drink piss watching the Sharks last year.
Always interesting to see views of people who think companies have capacity to just keep handing money over to employees without having longterm impacts on number employees, business viability, costs etc.

My old employer site in Australia had under $1B of income with a total wage bill pushing $200m.  The up coming 0.5% increase is $1m. Where do people think this $1m will come from? If we go back to mid 90's then this is $18m, where did they think this came from?

In the 90's many companies covered the cost of Super by advertising new roles as "Salary Package", ie Super came from the offered package, ie employee paid. For existing white collar roles future pay rises were basically factored to include the cost of Super and for wage roles this was factored into future wage rises.  

I've said it before I'm a strong supporter of SUPER and yes it needs to be increased to 25% by 2025, rising 1% per year. SUPER is needed, its a fairer system than the existing OAP scheme which needs to be wound up by the time Gen Y's get to retirement, if not before with a safety net put in for the small numbers who don't have sufficient SUPER. However its the Employees compulsory saving scheme funded mostly by the employees themselves and lets not pretend otherwise.

The main contribution of SUPER to the economy is the huge piles of cash that are now available for investment and the jobs they support. However if they simply drive industry off-shore to avoid funding SUPER, then its pointless.

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