Concerns over tram route numbers

 
  Myrtone Chief Commissioner

Location: North Carlton, Melbourne, Victoria
I'm not sure the simply using a pronunciation of a word that is a little different from the day to day pronunciation would cause confusion, or only cause confusion initially and stop being confusing once people become accustomed to it.

EDIT: The difference between the radio way of say 9 and what a regular person would say isn't that much, the difference might be barely noticable.

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  railblogger Chief Commissioner

Location: At the back of the train, quitely doing exactly what you'd expect.
I'm not sure the simply using a pronunciation of a word that is a little different from the day to day pronunciation would cause confusion, or only cause confusion initially and stop being confusing once people become accustomed to it.

EDIT: The difference between the radio way of say 9 and what a regular person would say isn't that much, the difference might be barely noticable.
Myrtone
I used 'niner' over the phone once - the person on the other end thought I was saying 'five'.
  Myrtone Chief Commissioner

Location: North Carlton, Melbourne, Victoria
How about the long pronunciation of 'four' which is found in some English dialects. I everyone posting so far doesn't seem to like the idea of something else but surely that doesn't mean it is a bad idea.
  route14 Chief Commissioner

The non-dialect pronounciation of four can be mistaken as "for" but that's not a number.
  justapassenger Minister for Railways

How about the long pronunciation of 'four' which is found in some English dialects.
Myrtone
No thanks. It is not found in Australian English and would therefore lead to creating confusion rather than clarity.

The only time in Australia where you would want to slightly elongate the pronunciation of "four" (but still not go to the "fo-wah" pronunciation) is if you are trying to communicate over a very scratchy connection. If the speakers on the passenger information systems get to that point they simply need repair/replacement.

I everyone posting so far doesn't seem to like the idea of something else but surely that doesn't mean it is a bad idea.
Myrtone
The reason I don't like it is because it is a bad idea.
  Myrtone Chief Commissioner

Location: North Carlton, Melbourne, Victoria
No thanks. It is not found in Australian English and would therefore lead to creating confusion rather than clarity.
justapassenger
What confusion? Even if it causes confusion at first, surely people could get used to it.

EDIT: Plenty of pronunciations not found in Australian English are commonly heard without causing confusion, often when we hear someone talk with a North American or regional British accent.
  justapassenger Minister for Railways

Nerds like you are the only people in Australia who have ever heard the "fo-wah" pronunciation. It is not a recognised pronunciation of "four" in Australian English.

Introduce that to passenger information systems and you'll have people scratching their heads wondering what on earth the speaker is carrying on about, when the purpose of a passenger information system is to communicate information about the service in a clear and concise manner.

It is a terrible idea.
  Myrtone Chief Commissioner

Location: North Carlton, Melbourne, Victoria
Introduce that to passenger information systems and you'll have people scratching their heads wondering what on earth the speaker is carrying on about, when the purpose of a passenger information system is to communicate information about the service in a clear and concise manner.
justapassenger
Good ideas are often resisted at first. The difference between the two pronunciations isn't that much, would people get used to it if used long enough?
  justapassenger Minister for Railways

I resisted it at first because it is a bad idea, not a good one.

I continue to resist it because your fuzzy attempts to argue only make me even more convinced that it is a bad idea. The pronunciation of four in Australian English is four, not fo-wah.

If you want to use the Scottish pronunciation, the borders are now open so you can go to Scotland and use it there.
  themetptc Train Controller

Location: Ballarat
Going off the topic, no concerns from me. Makes more sense now than they did in the '70s and far fewer too.
  Myrtone Chief Commissioner

Location: North Carlton, Melbourne, Victoria
Back in the 1970s, there were few, if any recorded announcements. While I can cope well without them, they are now a community expectation.

How can someone know that an idea they resist is a bad idea, not a good idea they are resisting at first?
  railblogger Chief Commissioner

Location: At the back of the train, quitely doing exactly what you'd expect.
Passenger information systems need to be kept simple and easy to understand. What you are proposing introduces unnecessary complexities.
  Myrtone Chief Commissioner

Location: North Carlton, Melbourne, Victoria
I am actually not, I don't believe it is pronounced fo-wah (in two syllables) in any English dialect. I'm referring to a slightly longer, but still monosyllabic pronunciation that is quite easy for practically anyone who knows English to understand.
The thing is that audio part of passenger information systems need to be friendly to all of those who need to hear them (the sort of thing @tonyp understands quite well) and very clear pronunciation may well make it easier for some to understand, such as foreigners and people with hearing problems.
My point is that a clear pronunciation that is either just as easy or easier for the majority to understand might be easier for the minorities mentioned to understand and so it should be reasonable to request such a pronunciation of letter and numeral names.
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Richmond Vic
I am interested in the title of this thread. . .Concern over tram route numbers. I wonder why it warrants concern. I live in Melbourne; I use trams, and it doesn't make a blind bit of difference whether the route number has 2 or 3 digits.
  themetptc Train Controller

Location: Ballarat
Actually my response was to the topic about route numbers, not the off topic English language/pronunciation. Again, the numbers make sense, are simple, easy to understand and are of no concern. The lack of simple/logical extensions to railway stations etc for public transport connections is more concerning.
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Richmond Vic
It seems that if there is no problem, don't worry; we shall manufacture one.

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