V/Line Cars Update 26/11-Consists, N5 Composite Brake Blocks

 
  vlinecars V/Man - "Yeah!"

Location: Here, there, everywhere!
Hi All,

Just an update on V/Line Carriages from my observations:


VZ Set Consist Update:

VZ1:    D335-ACZ259-BTN253-BZN256-BTN251

VZ2:    ACZ262-BTN268-BS216-BZN261

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Composite Brake Blocks fitted to Set N5:

It appears that in the past few weeks/month or so, set N5 has been fitted with Composite Brake Blocks – brake blocks that are composed of several different components, as apposed to simply cast iron.

From what my research has found, composite brake blocks are more effective than cast-iron ones - being quieter and providing more friction, allowing easier braking in all conditions.

Due to this arrangement, which to the best of my knowledge, is a first for VLP, stickers similar to the ‘STRICTLY AUTHORISED STAFF ONLY’ stickers on the external Conductors Van doors, have been stuck on the sides of the carriages on both sides of the BN at the West End, and both sides of the ACN at the East End - stating "COMPOSITE BRAKE BLOCKS FITTED".

I believe this is so that plain cast iron brake blocks are not used in conjunction with these new composite ones.

The below photo shows the two stickers:-


The below photo shows one of the composite brake blocks:-


From examination of the wheels/bogies, it appears that both sets of bogies on all three cars in N5 (ACN15, BRN40 and BN13) have composite brake blocks fitted.

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N8:

N8 seems to be sandwiched in between PH453 (at West End) and D322 (at East End). The reason for this is due to it typically running the 1240 to Warrnambool, returning on the 1745 up to Spencer Street, usually behind S302 – the vans help block out the noise of the S from the cars, and the PH van powers the carriages.

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VN17:
VN17 currently consists of BS217 - BZ267 - BN1 - BRN52 - ACN54

BZ267 is in the set in place of BZN258, which is presently at Newport Workshops for maintenance.

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N19 Update:
Keep an eye out very soon for N19 in service - N19 being the set with Power Locking doors.

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Hope this is of interest to somebody,

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  EL60 Chief Commissioner

Location: left
i saw VN18 set on Thursday for the trip to Ararat i noticed the train had a  FA livery A class with VN18 and PCJ492 it was interesting to see BZ267 replacing BZN258 for a while. thanks for the Sightings of the VLP carriages Matt i wonder whats happening with ACZ252 and ACZ257
  wongm GEEWONG

Location: Geelong, Victoria
ACZ252 and ACZ257 are the ex-WCR cars? (with the altered interior)

I used to always get one of them on an up Geelong service (on VZ1 or VZ2) but now they both seem to be cooling their heels down at Dudley Street sidings.
  vlinecars V/Man - "Yeah!"

Location: Here, there, everywhere!

ACZ252 and ACZ257 are the ex-WCR cars? (with the altered interior)


Yes, yes they are. Both with altered interiors and wheelchair accessible West End doors.


I used to always get one of them on an up Geelong service (on VZ1 or VZ2) but now they both seem to be cooling their heels down at Dudley Street sidings.


ACZ252 was in a VZ set for a period of time (VZ2 IIRC), however, has recently been removed.

You are quite right in their location - and thats where they'll stay til their needed to be put on to trains for additional capacity purposes!
  EL60 Chief Commissioner

Location: left
i was lucky before Z3 got removed and split up as Additional carriages
i had A60+BTN253+BS215+BZ267+ACZ257+PCO2 early this year to Ballarat
  DavidB Moderator

Location: Canberra
I'd be interested to hear from anybody who rides in the cars with composite brake blocks. They should be much quieter during braking.

I wonder what has prompted the change? VR went away from composite blocks several decades ago because steel was cheaper, but was much noisier and could cause unwanted vibration.

Cheers
David
  42101 Banned

Location: Banned
Wow i cannot belive that in this day and age that anyone would still be using cast steel brake blocks. composite blocks have been in use here in NSW for at least 20 years on freight and pass vehicles. Also about 7 years on locomotives. The comp type blocks cool quicker, wear slower and provide more friction during braking than the steel types. They are also half the weight of the cast steel ones. It spun me out that there were printed instructions on the brake shoe itself as to which way to install it  Laughing v/line pass must think their staff are dum or something. Very Happy greg g
  DavidB Moderator

Location: Canberra
Wow i cannot belive that in this day and age that anyone would still be using cast steel brake blocks. composite blocks have been in use here in NSW for at least 20 years on freight and pass vehicles.
"42101"

And the rest. The Southern Aurora had all composite brake blocks from new. And like all NSW country trains at the time, it was quiet. But vehicles being rapaired in Melbourne came out with steel brake blocks, resulting in greater noise when braking and vibration. Putting frequent vibration through a mild steel frame led to the fatigue problems around the bogie pivot, which is why some otherwise intact SA cars ended up at Sims. And also why Comeng went to corrugated stainless steel frames soon after.

It spun me out that there were printed instructions on the brake shoe itself as to which way to install it  Laughing v/line pass must think their staff are dum or something. Very Happy greg g
"42101"

No sillier than the instructions on a Claymore mine.



Cheers
David
  mjja Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Mount Waverley, Melbourne
Fancy putting something to stop the pax hearing the S! MadLaughing

I would guess composite brake blocks are more expensive than cast iron/steel ones; but why are they for authorized personnel only?
  wongm GEEWONG

Location: Geelong, Victoria
I was on VSH22 today, and it has the "COMPOSITE BRAKE BLOCKS FITTED"  stickers as well.
  vlinecars V/Man - "Yeah!"

Location: Here, there, everywhere!

I was on VSH22 today, and it has the "COMPOSITE BRAKE BLOCKS FITTED" stickers as well.


Thats good news - maybe some of the H sets will have a little bit quieter running - lol.

Did you notice changes in sound levels braking wise, or were they reasonably the same?
  wongm GEEWONG

Location: Geelong, Victoria
Did you notice changes in sound levels braking wise, or were they reasonably the same?

I didn't hear much difference, but I'm not really a person who notices the sounds in the first place.
  angus42 Chief Train Controller

Location: Around Kyneton-Melbourne

I was on VSH22 today, and it has the "COMPOSITE BRAKE BLOCKS FITTED" stickers as well.


Thats good news - maybe some of the H sets will have a little bit quieter running - lol.

Did you notice changes in sound levels braking wise, or were they reasonably the same?
"vicrailpics"


Ahh, now we won't be able to hear the brakes in H cars running on concrete sleepers!

I'm sure that when the H cars were in Harris suburban trains, they had composition brake blocks.  But the braking characteristics are different, so it may take some time for drivers to adjust their technique.
  M636C Minister for Railways

The Victorian Railways accepted wheels to AAR specification "U" which allows a higher brinell hardness than the other specifications. Because of this, I understand that wheels rejected for other specifications would be accepted for class U, and as a result these wheels were cheaper to buy. This carried a greater risk of failure due to cracking, and one cause of this is heating of the wheel due to braking. Since composition brake blocks involve higher coefficients of friction, the resultant heating would be greater. This may have been some of the background to the VR continuing to use metallic brake blocks, which I always heard referred to as "cast iron" rather than "cast steel", although I'd welcome any further information as to the material.

It is possible that the West Coast Railway derailment on the Geelong Line where a car was derailed due to a wheel crack was indirectly due to the acceptance of harder wheels by VR. Certainly, this type of failure is rare, but the risk might have been greater with extensive use of class U wheels with composition brake shoes.

It is possible that the use of these wheels had declined with attrition following privatisation, and that restrictions on the use of composition brake blocks can be relaxed now.

M636C
  monday Chief Commissioner

Which SA cars were scrapped??? Apart from Violet Town cars, I wasnt aware of any??? There was a FAM That was stripped and scrapped, but shaking to pieces would not account for this as it only ever ran in NSW and on the Brisbane Motorail.
  mjja Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Mount Waverley, Melbourne
It is possible that the West Coast Railway derailment on the Geelong Line where a car was derailed due to a wheel crack was indirectly due to the acceptance of harder wheels by VR. Certainly, this type of failure is rare, but the risk might have been greater with extensive use of class U wheels with composition brake shoes.
"M636C"

I understood it was because a handbrake was left on which resulted in the wheel overheating and cracking.

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