sneaky Junior Train Controller

Hi there

I noticed that the Snuggery triangle on the defunct? Tantanoola line has been removed, as well as all remains into the former factory and the private sidings into the Kimberly-Clark factory across the main road.

What was the purpose of the triangle and these private sidings?  What was carried and where to? Why was the triangle removed?

Cheers

Sponsored advertisement

  benscaro Chief Commissioner

Coal in, from Victoria, in briquettes I think ?  Small quantities, about two or three hoppers on most days, not sure of the wagon class but they were bogie hoppers a bit like VHGY grain hoppers in style.

Paper out, in an assorted rake of AN, Vic, WA and NSW (?) vans.  

Just about all this was worked across the border to Victoria, the % of goods from this line that went to Adelaide was very small.  

Here'a picture of the train as it arrived from Victoria, note the paper vans and you can just see a coal hopper behind them.

http://aufildesrails.free.fr/johndi/locos_large_files/21_loco_x&t.jpg

The V/Line locos were changed at Mt Gambier; they did not work to Snuggery which used an AN loco.

At Tantanoola itself dolomite was consigned to Dandenong, usually only 1-2 JDF/VHDY hoppers.  It's the first wagon behind the T.

Not 100% sure of the purpose of the triangle.  

However, I think the goods on this line terminated at Snuggery a lot of the time.  So it may be the triangle was there to turn single ended locos like 900s which laid over at Mt Gambier and worked the goods on the line ? I suppose they also used it to turn single ended 930s or even GMs which worked the goods here too in the last days of the broad gauge.

Single ended 930s often worked the Mt Gambier goods, ie, 967 in 1988; I believe the Mt Gambier overnight goods loco was often utilised to work the Millicent line goods. Here's 932 at the Mount:

http://aufildesrails.free.fr/johndi/locos_large_files/20_loco_y165&930.jpg

Ben
  bluebird Locomotive Fireman

Location: Balhannah SA
I don't know what is or isn't left at Snuggery, however apparently there is a major level crossing between Tantanoola and Snuggery that has been bitumised over and the warning devices have been removed (so I was told last year when I was on the last LCR train), no train can get much past Tant any more.

What I do know is that the line to Tantanoola is still intact and hopefully will be used again by LCR soon, see the following link... http://www.railpage.com.au/f-t11333415.htm
  Capegauge Chief Train Controller

Mt Gambier to tantanoola is still a good run - I don't think Snuggery and Millicent is needed for the tourist run
  85trainfan Train Controller

Location: If only I Knew, that would make 2 of us :)
Hi all
When i was in the south east early this year, i stoped at tantanoola.
The level crossing just before the tantanoola turn off, had the rails still in place but the crossing protection had been taken down. The points that lead into the factorys are still there , the lines are cut just outside the fence.
The track between tantantoola  and millicent is all overgrown , with some substanstal trees growing on it
  jm1941 Chief Commissioner

Location: Mount Gambier
I noticed that the Snuggery triangle on the defunct? Tantanoola line has been removed, as well as all remains into the former factory and the private sidings into the Kimberly-Clark factory across the main road.
"sneaky"

Yes it's all gone another era gone into oblivion, as be of no use anymore as that private property. To my knowledge the triangle did not belong to railways, but always used by railways. The steam historical steam trains use to use it on their trips to Snuggery

It was used originally for steam trains to turn around before diesels came along. Of course later on was handy for single ended 930's. But it was used nearly everyday for many, many years, right up till near closure of S.E line.

Why was the triangle removed?

I guess the owners maybe got a few bucks for unused scrap railway iron, that never be of any use to them anymore. Railway iron is much sort after by cockies.  In Apcel some of the track is under concrete for road trucks to drive over after end of rail.

What was the purpose of the triangle and these private sidings?  
What was carried and where to?
"sneaky"

Better make a cup of coffee mate, and put feet up and read on, this no fairy story.

Well once upon a time there was a nice SAR railway that was very busy, but since has faded off into sunset into that old railway heaven in the sky.  Laughing Oh! You want the story about it at cellulose, well.........

There was these two trains a day, that was happy days.

The first train departed Mount at 10:30am to Millicent and only went to Millicent and shunted mills for any loading on way back. When the briquettes for Apcel started up, these were sent always on the morning Millicent and while train at Millicent these wagons were unloaded and then picked up on the return and would go out on the 6pm night vicy. Note: The 6am to 8am morning Vicy would bring these briquettes anywhere between 6 to 12 hopper type wagons and take empty briquette wagons back out that evening.  An odd wagon would often catch fire, smoking like a steam train, especially if light rain on them as the coal would catch fire and we would have to get the Fire Brigade to quell fire with lots of water, then rush the wagon to Apcel so they could unload it straight away. Good fun.

The daytime Millicent had basically Millicent loading, plus super for sidings on way and would go to Millicent. Single ended 930's were mostly not used on the day Millicent. Were used on night Snuggery, but occasionally they were used in emergency to Millicent. They would then run reverse back to Cellulose from Millicent then turn the engine on triangle also at same time shunt Cellulose for the night train loading for the 8:30pm Mile End jet and Passenger and the 6pm dep Vicy jet. It would also shunt Apcel for toilet paper etc and Tanty for Dolomite wagons all for night Vicy jet. The day Millicent normally would not take empties for Cellulose or Apcel Mills unless urgently required, but would pickup all available loaded wagons for night jets. Though in latter years the Millicent would take empty louver vans for Apcel, as Apcel was quite busy then. Cellulose was a non event then.

The second train departed at 6:30pm called the "night snuggery"  This took out empties as well as loading for both mills

In earlier days Cellulose was a huge concern. Big tonnages of inwards white pulp paper from Sweden for mixing in with cardboard, and waste paper. Also wagons of recycle paper and cardboard came out of cellulose using mostly M type vans. If these wagons of paper rolls got away in a loose shunt with crook handbrake, the rolls were so heavy they would bulge out the end of the box car, fortunately not often. Cellulose was busy place till around late 70's, then Cellulose slowly closed down in early 80's (I think memory fades a little now).  Shunting in Cellulose was a major job to do. Remember, only hand signals and hand lamps used in those days, no radios. Always a guard and a porter were booked for the late afternoon Snuggery 6:30pm departure that only went to Snuggery and return.

Here is a rough rundown. Once you got to Snuggery on that 6:30pm night train. Cellulose only had about 3, maybe 4 spur lines and they were always full of loaded and empty wagons. One could not swing a cat out there at anytime. A near nightmare for train staff.

The Triangle was very important as we would take train to Snuggery, stop between the two triangle points on main line, then cut off GB on the main between the two triangle points. The train was always marshalled in proper order before departure and it was only a matter of first pushing the whole train completely into Cellulose (was a huge place with long track) and couple to the loaded box cars often 20 or 30 of them, throw the points and pull out onto mainline now facing Mt Gambier direction.  It was usually a huge long string by then. Then push the loaded box cars back onto GB on main line. Then go place the empty box cars, remember your still got a huge string of empties and loaded pulp paper.

All hand signals or should I say a hand kerosene lamp with a huge track curve into the cardboard loading dock and normally was easy to see engineman. There was always high packs of recycle cardboard bales and white pulp heaps stacked close to track. The porter most times had to climb on top of the paper stacks so see guard and engineman at same time. It was often hair raising stuff, also chuck in it was raining and windy as hell at times. Remember also this is the South East where "it rains 11 months of the year and drips off the trees the rest of the year, but not last few years". Smile The hardest part was not to smash into the dead end inside the cellulose building with the long strings. The dead end was built pretty solid, so it would stop you dead or damage the coupling on M van. Also put the engine crew hard back into their seats. Kept them awake to be vigilant for hand and lamp signals. Also all drivers are different, so you on the ground had to learn their habits quickly. When two way radios finally came in mid 1980’s it was pure bliss. The main part was not to get run over out there.

Then you picked up the empty OB's and the long car container wagons that had been used for waste recycle cardboard from Mile End, place them on main line with other empty OB's that had white pulp paper in. Now you could place the loaded waste paper and white pulp paper, then back onto the train and do air test and write up wagon numbers and tonnages as you were done with Cellulose. The worse part now over.

But that's not all you still had all of Apcel's empty VLX type vans with obf's of soda ash next to engine. It was just a matter of pulling whole train over the Millicent road Xing just in clear and go to work shunting Apcel nearly same again. pull out the loaded louver vans and empty obfs and place the empties and loaded soda ash. Then get back home around 4am or 5am if your lucky just in time for the morning 5am shunt crew to then pull your train to bits. Oh also there was Gy’s and Obf’s of super to place, at sidings like Marte and pickup empties and loaded dolomite on way back.

But then, the big bad wolf came along in sheep's clothing and huffed and puffed and trashed it all, so only thing left is the sad rail ending and no triangle anymore, the final end to an interesting era. Glad I was fortunate to have lived it.

Still awake.

Regards,
  allan Chief Commissioner

Still awake, and waiting for more! These workings have not been documented, to my knowledge.
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
Encore, author, more please! Very Happy
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
Excellent recollections John, thank you Very Happy
  sneaky Junior Train Controller

Nice stuff
  jm1941 Chief Commissioner

Location: Mount Gambier
I'm a little, er  Embarassed,,, but I'm very glad you all liked a little moment of what it was like in old(er) rail days with the little bit of humour added.

I was bit concerned it was getting too long and be not all that interesting. I could have near turned that into a few pages.
But I wrote it as what it was basically like with some feeling of the time. I use to do a bit of my rail exploits, both here at RP and at TS.com, (some still on my website) but in those early posting days one would often get rubbished at times which did put a dampener on doing it anymore. So seeing you fella's seriously liked that bit, when I see an item come up with something to jog my old rail memory like "sneaky" did, I'll give it a bash again, as these latter days the ol grey cells they ain't what they use to be.  Laughing

In reality, one needs a rail focus point to set me off, then there is usually no stopping me. Is hard to just think, "Oh I'll say this, or that just out of the blue. Hope you all understand my meaning here.  

Regards.
  allanl Chief Train Controller

Location: In the cab of 526 at 80 mph.
Hi John,
I wish someone could put a microphone under your nose for an hour a day for a few weeks, and record (and maybe print) some more of your memories - simply great reading.
allanl
  benscaro Chief Commissioner

John

Thanks a bunch for your reminiscences and for your fantastic Mt Gambier website.  

I for one amd keen to hear more of your memories and I am sure I'm not the only one.  

The 1970s and 80s was an era when steam had gone but the Internet had not arrived, so they often seem to miss out on attention, which is a bit sad.



From what I read, on the Snuggery line you might have:

VR coal/briquette hoppers (started 80s ?)
SAR M vans and similar for cellulose 1970s-early 80s
broad range of vans for newsprint
OBs and car container wagons (? not sure what type) for recycled cardboard
dolomite hoppers - not sure if this was always in hoppers and not sure when it started
OBFs of soda ash (for Apcel ?)

OBFs and GYs of super for sidings and Millicent
stock from Millicent
the lone HCA of cement for Millicent

That's a lot of variety.  

Were there any odd loco workings to note ?  I'm familiar with the GMs going there and the blue 961.  

I cannot remember the book which says 900s could work the Snuggery line - can you confirm whether that is true ?  I've heard all sorts of places they could theoretically work (including Willunga!) but evidence is lacking.

I assume no VR locos ever did at all, given they had SAR/AN locos handy at the Mount, though an X on the train would have looked good.

And I wonder, did any 500s or 800s ever get there ?  (They did get onto the Kingston line . . .)

Cheers

Ben
  jm1941 Chief Commissioner

Location: Mount Gambier
Thanks a bunch for your reminiscences and for your fantastic Mt Gambier website.
"benscaro"

Glad you enjoyed it.

I for one am keen to hear more of your memories and I am sure I'm not the only one.
"benscaro"

Now I know you guys are interested, see what I can do.

The 1970s and 80s was an era when steam had gone but the Internet had not arrived, so they often seem to miss out on attention, which is a bit sad.
"benscaro"

Yes the South East did not get lot of attention as I left the Peterborough Division (Jamestown) in 1970 to start as a shunter in the Mount and because the P/boro NG had just closed down attention was mainly up there. Little did we realise what was in store for South East, same fate as the NG.

From what I read, on the Snuggery line you might have:

VR coal/briquette hoppers (started 80s ?)
SAR M vans and similar for cellulose 1970s-early 80s
broad range of vans for newsprint
OBs and car container wagons (? not sure what type) for recycled cardboard
dolomite hoppers - not sure if this was always in hoppers and not sure when it started
OBFs of soda ash (for Apcel ?)

OBFs and GYs of super for sidings and Millicent
stock from Millicent
the lone HCA of cement for Millicent

That's a lot of variety.  
"benscaro"

Yes we did have a wide variety sent out there. This is where remembering truck types is getting little blurred. Probably if I see the name I'd know. This is what happens in latter years. OTD. (old timer's disease) Laughing The dolomite in GY's was before the Tantanoola Dolomite overhead bin came into play. No idea when. But Tanty would load bogie ELX's or similar type with  dolomite before it was put into the hopper wagons. All went over the border. We (AN) did all the work, Vic got all the loot.
Actually any open truck was used for waste paper & cardboard, even the old y's all for cellulose. Quite often there was a gaggle of different open wagons loaded with recycled paper & cardboard. But the Swedish white paper pulp was always in OB's, was heavy stuff too.

Were there any odd loco workings to note ?  I'm familiar with the GMs going there and the blue 961.
"benscaro"

I snatched my time in 1992 as could see writing on the wall, was very little shunting done by then, so I never got to see the blue 961 here.  Hmmm bugger.

I cannot remember the book which says 900s could work the Snuggery line - can you confirm whether that is true ?  I've heard all sorts of places they could theoretically work (including Willunga!) but evidence is lacking.
"benscaro"

The 900's would work the Mon - Wed - Fri passenger mixed freights into and out the Mount, mostly bought in high speed empty box cars for Apcel and the usual 4 loaded vans of local freight shed. We would shunt with 900's a lot as a shunt engine till around 11am, or, if short of power shunt with it all day. I vaguely remember a 900 did work to Millicent at least once. 930 that came in on 547's that would work the Millicent failed. I use to love to fly shunt with the 900's it was an incredible experience as 900's do not get off the mark like other engines. It was a real art. In the Mount a lot of fly shunting was done, like I said great days. AND never had a bingle either. We did a triple fly shunt once with 3 GY's to see if it could be done okay but not with a 900 either.  Very Happy

I assume no VR locos ever did at all, given they had SAR/AN locos handy at the Mount, though an X on the train would have looked good.
"benscaro"

Up to 1992, I do not remember any Vicy engines going to Millicent or Apcel. Mainly I think our crews were not vicy qualified to drive them. We did use them to shunt around the yards with a local Vic crew when a crew was stationed here as we had two shunt shifts for both yards.

And I wonder, did any 500s or 800s ever get there ?  (They did get onto the Kingston line . . .)
"benscaro"

I not remember the 500 working out on Millicent line, but I cannot say for sure it never did. We use to do odd things down here at times, not normal to other train working.  Till I left in 1992, I never saw an 800 here.


I wish someone could put a microphone under your nose for an hour a day for a few weeks, and record (and maybe print) some more of your memories - simply great reading.
"Allanl"

Laughing The local ABC have already done that, couple years ago. Spent 2 hours of sound recording of shunting days on NG. That was hard to do just off the cuff knowing it was to go to air. But the local ABC did a great job of editing it into 5x5 minutes segments that was played each morning at 6am for a week. I was terrified as to how it would come out, a lot of er's and are's, stops and starts and always totally aware your being recorded, is a lot of difference than just tapping the keyboard. They even used the Garratt whistling and starting off sound from off my website overlaid in it as well. I would not be too anxious to try that again. Got good report from those who heard it thankfully.

A fellow from Peterborough came here about 3 years ago spent half a day did taped recording of my Narrow Gauge days of the 60's which I was under the impression it was for the Canberra library later. Never heard what happened on that one, but that one was recorded easier as I just forgot the recording was on and he asked the right questions that got me going.

Regards,
  trainznbuses Train Controller

Location: Seacliff Park, SA
As a former (Childhood) resident of Millicent, the thing that makes me laugh/ Sad  cry about the whole Cellulose thing is that the place closed just as the whole recycling bandwagon was about to start.
I remember at primary school we used to have competitions  at the school to see which school house could bring in the most cardboard and newspaper to go to Cellulose to be made into new cardboard (or so we were told) as the winning team would get a half a day off of school! But by the time we left town (1985) to move to the big smoke the factory was well and truly closed.
It was probably early in the 90's when the whole recycling of Newspapers and Cardboard thing came back into vogue and I always thought that it was a great shame that it happened about 10 years too late to save poor old Cellulose. Always thought that Cellulose looked like the poor cousin to the gleaming Apcel over the road.

Much to my wifes disgust (She just doesn't understand!) on the odd occasions that we still go down that way I love driving in the area around the two mills and dreamily ?gunzel? the trackage going into Apcel and Cellulose. Last time that we were down that way, a couple of years ago, I would swear that the triangle track was still there going into Cellulose but that may have changed by now.
I guess/hope that Standardization of the Southeast lines must come to fruition at sometime and would hope that Snuggery as far as at least Apcel could be slotted into the equation. I know that realistically speaking Millicent will never see rail traffic again unless LCR were forced to relocate there because of Standardization of Mt Gambier Line  ConfusedShockedVery Happy

jm1941 It's been fantastic reading your recollections of the South East rail and I hope that this is plenty more to come in the future!!!
In your original long but very interesting post you mentioned how the historical steam societies used to use the triangle for turning the locos. I just happen to have a picture of 520 on the triangle which I used in a where is it question a while back. It took the punters here ages to guess it. I'm surprised that you didn't have a shot.

I just have two queries of you. Could you clarify for me, At Snuggery was there a single searchlight signal pointing towards Millicent between the Cellulose triangle and the Princes Highway crossing? I vaguely remember one being there (I think) and if so then where was the next one if you was heading towards the Mount? At the entrance to the Mount Gambier yards? And secondly, was the Princes Highway level crossing originally protected by ding-dongs or was it always a Stop/Give way sign crossing?
I'm just trying to get in touch with a few more of those childhood memories.
  jm1941 Chief Commissioner

Location: Mount Gambier
As a former (Childhood) resident of Millicent, the thing that makes me laugh/ Sad  cry about the whole Cellulose thing is that the place closed just as the whole recycling bandwagon was about to start.
I remember at primary school we used to have competitions  at the school to see which school house could bring in the most cardboard and newspaper to go to Cellulose to be made into new cardboard (or so we were told) as the winning team would get a half a day off of school! But by the time we left town (1985) to move to the big smoke the factory was well and truly closed.
"trainznbuses"

Yes I remember that went on as we use to get scrap cardboard & paper from all over the state, even the boy scouts in the Mount would be into that big time.

It was probably early in the 90's when the whole recycling of Newspapers and Cardboard thing came back into vogue and I always thought that it was a great shame that it happened about 10 years too late to save poor old Cellulose. Always thought that Cellulose looked like the poor cousin to the gleaming Apcel over the road.
"trainznbuses"

You made good point, another few years probably be different story in that area.  Yes actually when you drive past the old Cellulose mill there is something grand, old, majestic, mystique about the place, and over the road this gleaming shining big factory spewing out rotten smelling smoke. You living in Millicent I use to pity you people, the smell. Ah that's a stinking memory. Any train crew that worked to Snuggery would stink to high hell for couple of days. It was so bad that it would took couple of days to air out of your clothing. You NEVER put clothes away in cupboard, bad news.

Much to my wifes disgust (She just doesn't understand!) on the odd occasions that we still go down that way I love driving in the area around the two mills and dreamily ?gunzel? the trackage going into Apcel and Cellulose. Last time that we were down that way, a couple of years ago, I would swear that the triangle track was still there going into Cellulose but that may have changed by now.
"trainznbuses"

2 years ago the triangle was still there. To my knowledge was only removed not that long ago.

jm1941 In your original long but very interesting post you mentioned how the historical steam societies used to use the triangle for turning the locos. I just happen to have a picture of 520 on the triangle which I used in a where is it question a while back. It took the punters here ages to guess it. I'm surprised that you didn't have a shot.
"trainznbuses"

I use to have a go but been too busy of late so I never saw it.

I just have two queries of you. Could you clarify for me, At Snuggery was there a single searchlight signal pointing towards Millicent between the Cellulose triangle and the Princes Highway crossing? I vaguely remember one being there (I think)
"trainznbuses"

Yes there was a searchlight signal right at the Princes Road Xing facing Millicent direction. But it was not for train working as such. Like I said in my Cellulose write-up we use to have huge strings of loading pulling out of Cellulose and often would go over the Xing. Originally there was a circuit to set the Xing gongs off, but often the gongs we going and train not reach to Xing much to dismay of motorists as you can imagine.  So the signal light was installed which had two buttons.
(1) at the Xing itself
(2) at the Snuggery siding in Train Control box between the the two triangle switches, which by the way were high switchstands.
With the signal at red we could shunt train right up to Xing itself and not set gong/lights off. If there was need to travel past Xing the Guard could press signal xing button in TC box, OR, the fireman when engine stops at the Xing get out and press button there.

Note: If train was coming from Millicent it had to stop at the Princes Highway Xing and press the button. The signal had a delay before going green for the gongs be on long enough to stop traffic. Once green head off over Xing.

and if so then where was the next one if you was heading towards the Mount? At the entrance to the Mount Gambier yards?
"trainznbuses"

As I said that signal was not to do with train working as such. So there was no other train working signals on Millicent track. (it was always Train Order territory on Millicent line)  The only signals were the Lower quadrant signals at the White Avenue Signal Junction that governed the main line from Millicent and Naracoorte and main to Mt Gambier also into New marshalling yard.

And secondly, was the Princes Highway level crossing originally protected by ding-dongs or was it always a Stop/Give way sign crossing?
I'm just trying to get in touch with a few more of those childhood memories.
"trainznbuses"

I would say originally it was a "Look out for train" sign. But I rang an old engineman cobber who was here in Mount before me and he said he came in 1966 and he is pretty sure it was lights and gongs then.  He agreed with me that the xing signal was quite a late addition because of the original normal xing gong circuit setup.

Hope this is of help.
Regards,
  benscaro Chief Commissioner

Just going through back issues of Catchpoint and noted a shot in a 1992 issue of another single-ender down there, 934 with the usual array of boxvans, dolomite and coal hoppers, taken at Tantanoola.  I guess that run would have utilised the triangle!

Ben
  jm1941 Chief Commissioner

Location: Mount Gambier
Being a single ended engine Ben, it would have used the triangle for sure.

Here is photo taken by Wayne Morris of engine 706 using the Snuggery triangle 16th January 1991.
Click HERE
That is Cellulose in background.

This next one also taken by Wayne Morris is 932 single ender near Marte coming back from Snuggery around 1991.
Click HERE

Regards.
  benscaro Chief Commissioner

John

Wow!  Great shots.  Thank you.  (would love to see more Very Happy )  I heard that 1990 was the first time 700s got down to the Mount, so 706 must have been a bit novel in 1991.  

Ben
  jm1941 Chief Commissioner

Location: Mount Gambier
John

Wow!  Great shots.  Thank you.  (would love to see more Very Happy )  
I heard that 1990 was the first time 700s got down to the Mount, so 706 must have been a bit novel in 1991.  
"benscaro"

Yes we did start getting any old engine in our neck of the woods even the GM's. I last saw them on Standard Gauge in 1970 when the SG got the NG scrapped back in 1970 on P/Boro division. The blighters followed me down here 20 years later. Took em awhile to find me though.  Laughing  Bugger of an engine to shunt with, give me an Alco anytime.

Here is pic again by Wayne Morris of GM42 working out to Snuggery around 1992.
Click HERE

Regards,
  mynameismike Deputy Commissioner

Location: /dev/adelaide/magill
Did the 900's ever make it to the mount or where they scrapped before the conversion?
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
By 900's do you mean the current ex 830's or the old English Electric 900 class.

The original 900's were frequent visitors to Mt Gambier over the years, I don't think a current 900/DA has ever been there, but I may be wrong!
  mynameismike Deputy Commissioner

Location: /dev/adelaide/magill
Bah a DA isn't a proper 900.  The only real 900 is an E.E.
  jm1941 Chief Commissioner

Location: Mount Gambier
By 900's do you mean the current ex 830's or the old English Electric 900 class.
"David Peters"

The English Electric 900 class.

Locomotive numbers:- 900-909
Type:- Diesel-Electric
Introduced:- 1951
Number in class:- 10
Manufacturer:- SAR
Gauge Broad  
Axles:- A1A-A1A
Length:- 20.17 m
Mass:- 128 t
Engine:- EE 16SVT
Generator:= EE 822-17K
Traction motors:- EE 523
Power:- 1185 kW / 1585 HP
Tractive effort:- 279 / 151 kN
Speed:- 119 km/h

The best and most beautiful sounding engine on the SAR.  
In my day 830's were just that, 830's.

Did the 900's ever make it to the mount or where they scrapped before the conversion?
"mynameismike"

I came to Mount in 1970  the 900 class always worked the 8:30pm Mon - Wed - Fri  Blue Lake mixed passenger out of the Mount till they were withdrawn.
The Blue Lake mixed passenger dept Adelaide Station 8pm Sun - Tue- Thurs with a 900 to the Mount.
The 900 from off the passenger was the local shunt engine most times till around 11am.

regards,
  benscaro Chief Commissioner


The original 900's were frequent visitors to Mt Gambier over the years, I don't think a current 900/DA has ever been there, but I may be wrong!
"David Peters"



I can't quite recall whether any DAs worked to the Mount.  DA1 was on s.g. and DA4 was on narrow so they certainly didn't.  

DA2 may have though ?  DA2 was on broad gauge in the 1990s.

Not sure about DA3, think it was on standard all the time it was a DA until it got written off.  

DA5 came into service just as the standard gauge went through so it never got there.  

The CKs did work the Mt Gambier goods though, in 1994 Catchpoint recorded one working with an 830.

Ben

Sponsored advertisement

Subscribers: jm1941, mynameismike, Pressman

Display from:   

Quick Reply

We've disabled Quick Reply for this thread as it was last updated more than six months ago.