HELP - History of train announcements

 
  melbtrans Locomotive Fireman

Wanting to know more about the history of automated announcements (both on-train and at station) in Melbourne. Any recordings/descriptions of what was said would be greatly appreaciated. Feel free to post here.

Thanks

Melbtrans.

Sponsored advertisement

  wongm GEEWONG

Location: Geelong, Victoria
I believe the PRIDE system for automated announcements was deployed in the late 1990s/early 2000s.

On train announcements didn't start until the refurbished Comeng trains entered service, from 2000/2001.



  alstom_888m Chief Commissioner

Location:
I can remember automated announcements at Spencer Street as early as 1994.
  wongm GEEWONG

Location: Geelong, Victoria
I can remember automated announcements at Spencer Street as early as 1994.
"alstom_888m"

Was it on the country platforms? They had a passenger information system with LCD displays board on each platform from very early on.

[img]http://railgallery.wongm.com/cache/southern-cross-station/194_9406_595.jpg[/img]
  alstom_888m Chief Commissioner

Location:
Yes, that is what I meant. Those LCD displays were in use, along with a male automated announcement similar to the one in use on the suburban network before Metro took over. The announcement had a tone (keying upward) and always started with "May I have your attention please" if my memory serves me correctly.
  712M Chief Commissioner

The old announcements at Spencer St were by Ric Stone if I remember correctly...

Something like: "The train....now standing....on platform.....2.......is the....service to....Geelong. This train....will be departing in....5......minutes."

I think I prefer the Southern Cross lady actually.



  Brendan03 Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney
The old announcements at Spencer St were by Ric Stone if I remember correctly...

Something like: "The train....now standing....on platform.....2.......is the....service to....Geelong. This train....will be departing in....5......minutes."

I think I prefer the Southern Cross lady actually.


"712M"


No way! The old chime that sounded like someone sitting in a control room with a childrens toy keyboard they'd bought from the local chinese operated variety store was by far, the best chime that our rail network had ever experienced.

Although the "Tripping Balls" version of Southern' Cross's announcements when they're broadcast across the whole station and you can hear it cascading through with a serious echo, does bring me a considerable level of amusement too.
  mikealex Station Staff

Way back in the early 80s Flinders St had an automated female announcement system that appeared to be based on tapes.

The arrival announcements started with "Flinders St, Flinders St, Platform x", then the usual "Glen Waverley train, stopping all stations to Glen Waverley" sort of thing. I don't recall the train times being part of the announcement.

At departure the announcement would be the same "Glen Waverley train, stopping all stations to Glen Waverley" bit, followed by "Departing Platform x. Stand clear please, STAND CLEAR", with quite an emphasis on the final "Stand Clear".

I do also recall the tapes getting misaligned towards the end of this system, so you would hear things like "Kilda Train Saint"
  Ballast_Plough Chief Commissioner

Location: Lilydale, Vic
At times there seemed to be almost a form of rebellion at Flinders St with the automated announcements. The lady would say her piece and then 1 of the platform staff would rattle off exactly the same thing at 100 mph which was usually totally undecipherable.

On a related note, a mate used to be signalman at the old Broadmeadows signalbox. At times I would pay a visit during the day and would assist with some of the PA announcements seeing as that was the signalmans duty. If he was otherwise occupied on the phone it was considered fair game to use a fake accent. "NEXTA TRAIN ONA PLATFORM 1 ISA BROADAMEADOWS TRAIN TO A FLINDERS STREET STOPPIN ALL A STATIONS. STANDA CLEARA PLEASE".

This usually resulted in him kicking me out of the box because all the station staff were ethnic and thought he was taking the mickey out of them!   Very Happy
  Kerpal Deputy Commissioner

I can remember automated announcements at Spencer Street as early as 1994.
"alstom_888m"

Was it on the country platforms? They had a passenger information system with LCD displays board on each platform from very early on.

[img]http://railgallery.wongm.com/cache/southern-cross-station/194_9406_595.jpg[/img]
"wongm"


Now I see the inspiration for the Metlink signs!
  wongm GEEWONG

Location: Geelong, Victoria
Was it on the country platforms? They had a passenger information system with LCD displays board on each platform from very early on.

[img]http://railgallery.wongm.com/cache/southern-cross-station/194_9406_595.jpg[/img]
"wongm"


Now I see the inspiration for the Metlink signs!
"Kerpal"


It was actually the other way around - those plain looking light blue signs at Spencer Street Station were modelled on the Metlink ones. They were installed in 2004/05 as part of the station upgrade works, and were made of corrugated plastic: they were a temporary solution until the real signage was installed, which is still in place today.
  Brendan03 Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney
Was it on the country platforms? They had a passenger information system with LCD displays board on each platform from very early on.

[img]http://railgallery.wongm.com/cache/southern-cross-station/194_9406_595.jpg[/img]
"wongm"


Now I see the inspiration for the Metlink signs!
"Kerpal"


It was actually the other way around - those plain looking light blue signs at Spencer Street Station were modelled on the Metlink ones. They were installed in 2004/05 as part of the station upgrade works, and were made of corrugated plastic: they were a temporary solution until the real signage was installed, which is still in place today.
"wongm"


Whilst we're on the topic of signage (As I just posted about in another thread) -- Wasn't the modern day metlink signage modeled off of M>Trains 'branding' - ie, Watergardens was the first to receive such style, then with the National Express fiasco, All rights, designs and licences were taken over by the government after which, Metlink was born?

Bernie Carolan was the CEO after all and it only makes sense that if he signed off on the M>Train design, They'd take it over to Metlink.

(I'm aware that Cornwall design agency 'did' Metlink but I'm just curious if they were given the M>Train stuff and told "Make this better, Uniform it")
  Braddo Deputy Commissioner

Location: Narre Warren
Hah... They actually paid someone to design the metlink signage? What a joke.
  wongm GEEWONG

Location: Geelong, Victoria
Hah... They actually paid someone to design the metlink signage? What a joke.
"Braddo"

Pretty much every piece of signage you see today was designed by someone paid money to do so. Your point being?
  Sir Thomas Bent Minister for Railways

Location: Banned
Going right back in time to the 19th century, in the early days of the Victorian Railways, Lad Porters or other such supernumerary staff were instructed to stand at the end of the platforms and announce in a strident voice the name of the station that the train was arriving in.
It was clearly not done as well as it could have been, or at least not to the standard that pleased the Commissioners, as there was correspondence that the announcements were not at an acceptable standard.
  Braddo Deputy Commissioner

Location: Narre Warren
Hah... They actually paid someone to design the metlink signage? What a joke.
"Braddo"

Pretty much every piece of signage you see today was designed by someone paid money to do so. Your point being?
"wongm"

My point being that they are very basic signs that anyone with half a brain would be capable of "designing" in a matter of minutes with MS Paint.
  Webslave Site Admin

Location: Altona, Melbourne
The city loop used to have the lady announcements of the form similar to:
"*tone* The xMadx Frankston train is scheduled to arrive next.  Stopping all stations"
and:
"*tone* The xMadx Frankston train is now approaching.  Please stand clear"

For their age, they weren't half bad.
  harrisfan124 Train Controller

Location: on the train/Sydenham line
Way back in the early 80s Flinders St had an automated female announcement system that appeared to be based on tapes.

The arrival announcements started with "Flinders St, Flinders St, Platform x", then the usual "Glen Waverley train, stopping all stations to Glen Waverley" sort of thing. I don't recall the train times being part of the announcement.

At departure the announcement would be the same "Glen Waverley train, stopping all stations to Glen Waverley" bit, followed by "Departing Platform x. Stand clear please, STAND CLEAR", with quite an emphasis on the final "Stand Clear".

I do also recall the tapes getting misaligned towards the end of this system, so you would hear things like "Kilda Train Saint"
"mikealex"


I rember that Lady She told you straight STAND CLEAR in way you understood or eles
  Brendan03 Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney
Hah... They actually paid someone to design the metlink signage? What a joke.
"Braddo"

Pretty much every piece of signage you see today was designed by someone paid money to do so. Your point being?
"wongm"

My point being that they are very basic signs that anyone with half a brain would be capable of "designing" in a matter of minutes with MS Paint.
"Braddo"


To be more precise, The Metlink branding designed by Cornwall was not just signage, but Timetables, Maps, Intermodal information (such as Green bars on bus stop signs, where a bus stop will be in the vicinity of a tram stop and vice versa) - Fold out maps, The metlink logo, the design of the pictographs for Taxi, Tickets, Information, Parking, Way Out signs, The design of the arrows used, The shades of the colours used, The format in which the information is presented, the alignment of text on the signs, The logos which represent interchanges at stations (for example the orange Triangle representing a bus that connects at a station on the train network map, or the blue circle on a bus route map indicating a metro train connection or purple, indicating a V/Line connection)

This is just a summary of the things outlined in a style-guide. The Metlink style guide, not that I've ever had the luck of reading, apparently spans over two DVDs.

Many people don't realise the extent transit organisations go to, to make information easy to understand. Just like the planned train network map. It's not as simple as drawing a few lines. You have to work out the best way to present the information to passengers. You don't simply throw something together. You have to understand how it communicates with the people reading it. Providing them with what they need to know without overwhelming them.

Creating such a product isn't as simple as opening MS Paint and writing something in the default font and picking a colour you like from the colour pallette.
  Brendan03 Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney
The city loop used to have the lady announcements of the form similar to:
"*tone* The xMadx Frankston train is scheduled to arrive next.  Stopping all stations"
and:
"*tone* The xMadx Frankston train is now approaching.  Please stand clear"

For their age, they weren't half bad.
"Webslave"


She was lovely. Much like an earlier day M>Train lady. Clear, Concise, Understandable and didn't sound like Rozz Switzer trying to sell you Lipton Chai Tea.
  712M Chief Commissioner

Hah... They actually paid someone to design the metlink signage? What a joke.
"Braddo"

Pretty much every piece of signage you see today was designed by someone paid money to do so. Your point being?
"wongm"

My point being that they are very basic signs that anyone with half a brain would be capable of "designing" in a matter of minutes with MS Paint.
"Braddo"


To be more precise, The Metlink branding designed by Cornwall was not just signage, but Timetables, Maps, Intermodal information (such as Green bars on bus stop signs, where a bus stop will be in the vicinity of a tram stop and vice versa) - Fold out maps, The metlink logo, the design of the pictographs for Taxi, Tickets, Information, Parking, Way Out signs, The design of the arrows used, The shades of the colours used, The format in which the information is presented, the alignment of text on the signs, The logos which represent interchanges at stations (for example the orange Triangle representing a bus that connects at a station on the train network map, or the blue circle on a bus route map indicating a metro train connection or purple, indicating a V/Line connection)

This is just a summary of the things outlined in a style-guide. The Metlink style guide, not that I've ever had the luck of reading, apparently spans over two DVDs.

Many people don't realise the extent transit organisations go to, to make information easy to understand. Just like the planned train network map. It's not as simple as drawing a few lines. You have to work out the best way to present the information to passengers. You don't simply throw something together. You have to understand how it communicates with the people reading it. Providing them with what they need to know without overwhelming them.

Creating such a product isn't as simple as opening MS Paint and writing something in the default font and picking a colour you like from the colour pallette.
"Brendan03"


Did Cornwall also design the most recent tram maps and the PTV signage?
  Brendan03 Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney
Hah... They actually paid someone to design the metlink signage? What a joke.
"Braddo"

Pretty much every piece of signage you see today was designed by someone paid money to do so. Your point being?
"wongm"

My point being that they are very basic signs that anyone with half a brain would be capable of "designing" in a matter of minutes with MS Paint.
"Braddo"


To be more precise, The Metlink branding designed by Cornwall was not just signage, but Timetables, Maps, Intermodal information (such as Green bars on bus stop signs, where a bus stop will be in the vicinity of a tram stop and vice versa) - Fold out maps, The metlink logo, the design of the pictographs for Taxi, Tickets, Information, Parking, Way Out signs, The design of the arrows used, The shades of the colours used, The format in which the information is presented, the alignment of text on the signs, The logos which represent interchanges at stations (for example the orange Triangle representing a bus that connects at a station on the train network map, or the blue circle on a bus route map indicating a metro train connection or purple, indicating a V/Line connection)

This is just a summary of the things outlined in a style-guide. The Metlink style guide, not that I've ever had the luck of reading, apparently spans over two DVDs.

Many people don't realise the extent transit organisations go to, to make information easy to understand. Just like the planned train network map. It's not as simple as drawing a few lines. You have to work out the best way to present the information to passengers. You don't simply throw something together. You have to understand how it communicates with the people reading it. Providing them with what they need to know without overwhelming them.

Creating such a product isn't as simple as opening MS Paint and writing something in the default font and picking a colour you like from the colour pallette.
"Brendan03"


Did Cornwall also design the most recent tram maps and the PTV signage?
"712M"


I'm not quite sure, I know they did QRN and NightRider. They did Sustainability Victoria which has the logo of S> so it wouldn't surprise me if they did.

Check out their site.
http://www.cornwell.com.au/
  Z181 Chief Train Controller

Location: Mernda
M>Robot. Who could forget that depressed woman?

The best on board annocements was the original set on the Alstom Comengs straight after reffurbishment. Connex Lady chirping away with the service type and stations along route. Used to announce everything the PIDs displayed and the short lived "Flinders St, this service is now complete"

They did butcher it over the years though. Used to laugh when some trains on Volume 100 she would scream CONNEX at you before saying the service type/desternation. (always cutting the "Welcome to" off)
  Braddo Deputy Commissioner

Location: Narre Warren
I always thought the voice on the Alstom sets sounded very unnatural. The M>Robot sounded much more like a person in my opinion.
  Heihachi_73 Chief Commissioner

Location: Terminating at Ringwood
AFAIK Spencer Street had two different PA tones, one for country trains, and the other tone being the same as the City Loop and Box Hill (and others).

Sponsored advertisement

Display from:   

Quick Reply

We've disabled Quick Reply for this thread as it was last updated more than six months ago.