NEW Full Time CEO for V/Line Announced

 
  Velocity Beginner

Good luck mate, you're gonna need it...

I'm interested in seeing how he deals with the ageing V/Line Locomotive Fleet and what he plans to do with it. As much as I'd like to say they do, Train's don't live forever.

All I can say is don't mess it up, and keep people in the loop. You'll be in the office for a long time if you follow that

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  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
What new insights could this appointee bring to V/Line?
x31
That wheels need periodic maintenance.
That if locos are maintained properly they will last almost for ever.
That SG does exist in Victoria and those who use it should receive the same level of service as those on the BG network.
  Crossover Train Controller

Location: St. Albans Victoria
What new insights could this appointee bring to V/Line?
That wheels need periodic maintenance.
That if locos are maintained properly they will last almost for ever.
That SG does exist in Victoria and those who use it should receive the same level of service as those on the BG network.
YM-Mundrabilla
        At least in Victoria , unlike some other states we have a reasonably comprehensive regional network ( Rail and Coach ) that services pretty much all of the state and mostly reasonable well .
Certainly there is need for constant improvement , notably the North East and Goulburn Valley routes .
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat RFR Line
Good luck mate, you're gonna need it...

I'm interested in seeing how he deals with the ageing V/Line Locomotive Fleet and what he plans to do with it. As much as I'd like to say they do, Train's don't live forever.

All I can say is don't mess it up, and keep people in the loop. You'll be in the office for a long time if you follow that
Velocity

The V/Line locomotive fleet are the subject of a funded study in this years budget to ascertain the best way going forward for the long distance fleet which are scheduled for replacement from 2018 onwards.
  Duncs Chief Commissioner

Good luck mate, you're gonna need it...

I'm interested in seeing how he deals with the ageing V/Line Locomotive Fleet and what he plans to do with it. As much as I'd like to say they do, Train's don't live forever.

All I can say is don't mess it up, and keep people in the loop. You'll be in the office for a long time if you follow that

The V/Line locomotive fleet are the subject of a funded study in this years budget to ascertain the best way going forward for the long distance fleet which are scheduled for replacement from 2018 onwards.
The Vinelander
Vossloh Type 68 series. You don't need a study for seeing the obvious.
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Richmond Vic
Vossloh Type 68 series. You don't need a study for seeing the obvious.
"Duncs"
Of course you do. It's Government policy to commission the uninterested and uninformed to do the unnecessary.
  mejhammers1 Chief Commissioner

Be reasonable . The apointee has wide experience in railways over 30 years in Australia and Overseas in both Government and Private enterprise . Where he originally comes from is irrelevant really .  He has extensive experience previously on the Metropolitan Melbourne network .

The advert required extensive railway experience and he has that both in Operations, Maintenance and  private Consulting .
Andrew Lezala had "experience" as well.

None of this is surprising why do we think anything will really change?

Lezala runs the worst performing must unpopular transport system in Australia 5 years running.  Proabably good mates with the guy they have just appointed.
x31
I am going to play devils advocate here and say that the above can be misleading. As simple as the Melbourne Rail Network is you simply cannot compare the results when the Adelaide Rail Network carries the fewest number of Passengers of any urban rail network in Australia and New Zealand. They would be lucky to find anyone who regularly uses the network. Melbourne has the worst performing network, not because of Metro, its because the rail assets of Melbourne has been sweated to the point of exhaustion and insufficient maintenance has been done and this has been going on for decades.

Michael
  MetroFemme Assistant Commissioner

If metro cannot adequately spend a billion dollars a year on maintaining and upgrading the network then let's get someone else in.
  SEMartin Chief Train Controller

Location: Canberra ACT
Any answers to a very good question?

For my thinking why can;t we find good capable Australian Management for V/Line?
Because of a particular mindset which holds that if it's imported it has to be better.
Valvegear
Well by that yardstick, there goes most of the VR Chief Commissioners in the 19th and early 20th Century then (think Speight, Tait, Clapp, etc) and most Australian railway management in the same period (think Whitton, Thow, Webb and many others). It took generations to develop local management skill.
The other, more confrontational thought is that the local pool of management talent is no good, so competent people have to be hired in from elsewhere to do the job.
  Madjikthise Deputy Commissioner

Any answers to a very good question?

For my thinking why can;t we find good capable Australian Management for V/Line?
Because of a particular mindset which holds that if it's imported it has to be better.
Well by that yardstick, there goes most of the VR Chief Commissioners in the 19th and early 20th Century then (think Speight, Tait, Clapp, etc) and most Australian railway management in the same period (think Whitton, Thow, Webb and many others). It took generations to develop local management skill.
The other, more confrontational thought is that the local pool of management talent is no good, so competent people have to be hired in from elsewhere to do the job.
SEMartin
Or the even more confrontational thought that the local pool of management talent refuses to bend to demands to cut corners on safety, maintenance, repairs, etc.
  SEMartin Chief Train Controller

Location: Canberra ACT
Any answers to a very good question?

For my thinking why can;t we find good capable Australian Management for V/Line?
Because of a particular mindset which holds that if it's imported it has to be better.
Well by that yardstick, there goes most of the VR Chief Commissioners in the 19th and early 20th Century then (think Speight, Tait, Clapp, etc) and most Australian railway management in the same period (think Whitton, Thow, Webb and many others). It took generations to develop local management skill.
The other, more confrontational thought is that the local pool of management talent is no good, so competent people have to be hired in from elsewhere to do the job.
Or the even more confrontational thought that the local pool of management talent refuses to bend to demands to cut corners on safety, maintenance, repairs, etc.
Madjikthise
In my decade-plus experience in the industry, local managers can be just a bendable as the imports. Country of origin is no indicator of competence or skill.
  gippslander Chief Commissioner

Location: Central Gippsland, Vic
Past VR management were not always as savvy as some might think. Who took responsibility for ordering the J & R class loco fleet in the early 50s when dieselisation was running at a cracking pace throughout the developed world? Those locos only ran in commercial service for a few years - what would the auditor-General make of that purchasing decision these days.
And what about the failure to adapt to the new world once regulation protecting rail freight ended? The VR ran hopelessly uneconomic branch lines (albeit often scenic and fascinating to rail fans) well into the 70s without seriously taking on the road industry which was getting ever more efficient. Of course, no doubt some of the VR's problems would have been caused by the voting power of the old Country Party, when it was very effective in pushing the interests of its rural constituents.
  gippslander Chief Commissioner

Location: Central Gippsland, Vic
Past VR management were not always as savvy as some might think. Who took responsibility for ordering the J & R class loco fleet in the early 50s when dieselisation was running at a cracking pace throughout the developed world? Those locos only ran in commercial service for a few years - what would the auditor-General make of that purchasing decision these days.
And what about the failure to adapt to the new world once regulation protecting rail freight ended? The VR ran hopelessly uneconomic branch lines (albeit often scenic and fascinating to rail fans) well into the 70s without seriously taking on the road industry which was getting ever more efficient. Of course, no doubt some of the VR's problems would have been caused by the voting power of the old Country Party, when it was very effective in pushing the interests of its rural constituents.
  LancedDendrite Chief Commissioner

Location: Gheringhap Loop Autonomous Zone
Past VR management were not always as savvy as some might think. Who took responsibility for ordering the J & R class loco fleet in the early 50s when dieselisation was running at a cracking pace throughout the developed world? Those locos only ran in commercial service for a few years - what would the auditor-General make of that purchasing decision these days?
gippslander
The logic behind the R and J class purchases was pretty solid at the time. The VR badly needed a replacement for the clapped-out A2s and they couldn't get the US currency to purchase diesel-electric locos, so they ordered the R class from North British Locomotive. The J classes were similar, but for the branchline locos. Remember, the whole Victorian railway system was in a pretty dire state at the end of WW2 and they needed as much new replacement motive power as possible just to keep it running.

The real craziness was when the VR ordered so many T class locos to service the dying branchlines when they should've bought heavier and more powerful locos to make their mainline services more efficient.
  DalyWaters Chief Commissioner


The other, more confrontational thought is that the local pool of management talent is no good, so competent people have to be hired in from elsewhere to do the job.
SEMartin
In Victoria alone, we had Marinus Van Onselen at the head of Freight Victoria and Freight Australia through growth years (until Pacific National rode in to the rescue to ensure the demise of Victorian freight).

We have also had John Guiry at freight roles here before he took up his current position as CEO of Cambodian Railways.

As with most things, we are as good as anyone in this world at any role.  It is just the inferiority complex of politicians and senior bureaucrats that fall for the mistaken belief that anyone from Britain must be better than us colonials.
  prwise Locomotive Driver

The real craziness was when the VR ordered so many T class locos to service the dying branchlines when they should've bought heavier and more powerful locos to make their mainline services more efficient.
LancedDendrite
Off topic but I always wondered about VR's love affair with T class. And stories abound that the wheel configuration did not do wonders for treating the track kindly on curves.
  Bogong Chief Commissioner

Location: Essendon Aerodrome circa 1980
Going back a little further, I reckon the N class steam locomotives were by far the biggest stuff up. The same power as the K class, but because of the trailing wheels, too long to fit on many branch line turntables. Despite noticing this glaring problem with the two pre-war locally produced batches and also noting their unpopularity with crews in the way they ran and steamed, after the war the VR authorities built more themselves and also ordered more from abroad, only to immediately get rid of 10 of them to the SAR who were even more desperate for light line locomotives.

The only feeble argument for ever producing the N class was that they had the potential to be gauge convertible, but that didn't stop the VR churning out plenty of the proven and reliable K class in the 1940s or designing the potentially gauge convertible J class (which also fitted on branch line turntables) at almost the same time as the two post war batches of N's.
  emmastreet Train Controller

Location: Goulburn Valley

The other, more confrontational thought is that the local pool of management talent is no good, so competent people have to be hired in from elsewhere to do the job.In Victoria alone, we had Marinus Van Onselen at the head of Freight Victoria and Freight Australia through growth years (until Pacific National rode in to the rescue to ensure the demise of Victorian freight).

We have also had John Guiry at freight roles here before he took up his current position as CEO of Cambodian Railways.

As with most things, we are as good as anyone in this world at any role.  It is just the inferiority complex of politicians and senior bureaucrats that fall for the mistaken belief that anyone from Britain must be better than us colonials.
DalyWaters
Marinus Van Onselen also worked for V/line and was instrumental in getting Mooroopna and Tocumwal container terminals established. Last I heard he went to America. A great loss to the Victorian rail scene.
  Heihachi_73 Chief Commissioner

Location: Terminating at Ringwood
Off topic but I always wondered about VR's love affair with T class. And stories abound that the wheel configuration did not do wonders for treating the track kindly on curves.
"prwise"

IIRC the T classes had something to do with the track quality and loading gauge, and of course, the sheer amount of small branch lines we had. We had severely underweight rails, some of which dated back to the 1880s, which couldn't handle what would have been deemed today an average load. These rails were designed around tiny tank engines (think Thomas and Percy) and four-wheeled British-spec wagons (the troublesome trucks, no less). The rails and loading gauge is probably the sole reason we didn't get US-spec locos down here. In fact, I think the only place where ex-American locos even exist in this country is in the Pilbara.
  BDA Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney
Yep perway capacity and loading gauge , otherwise they could be and have been everywhere .

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