Dumb and dumber - weights, measures and language

 
  Aaron Minister for Railways

Location: University of Adelaide SA
1791 nautical miles...
We may as well chuck in Jules Verne's "5,000 leagues under the sea" - it makes just as much sense as the original.
Valvegear
Nautical miles are a legitimate measure of distance, likewise leagues at the time (still legitimate, just not in regular use), that you don't understand NM (or nmi) and presumably therefore knots is not an error by the author.

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  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
Apropos the difference in speeds - years ago 3801 visited Melbourne and ran parallel with R761 from Wodonga.
With the wooden-bodied consist, the "S" circular read "Maximum permissible speed, 80 km/h"
I paced the trains from Longwood to Avenel, and it was 115 to 120 km/h all the way.
The driver of the R was a well known rail historian and steam driver ( sadly, no longer with us) and I was having a yarn with him later. I remarked, "That was a very interesting 80 km/h, Fred!" (name changed). "Oh", he said ingenuously, "was it meant to be kilometres?"
Valvegear
The side topic of trains proven by Valvegear to be exceeding max speed such as 120kph instead of 80kph, reminds me of the rail fan tales of a 38 class doing the ton (supposed 100mph) or at least around 90mph or so it is said, along the Breadalbane straight between Goulburn and Gunning. The 1967 Working Timetable shows the 38 class as 60mph max Campbelltown Junee and 70mph max Junee Albury. Some rail fans claim the very high speeds of their favourite loco were calculated from mile posts or similar and apparently there were inspectors in the loco cabs of these high speed trips. Some documents allow a 10% increase if late or similar situations, but 10% of 60mph in that area is not 80mph or 90mph or 100mph as these assertions date from pre metric era. When asked on various internet forums, these 38 class people say their assertions are correct.
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
Nautical miles are a legitimate measure of distance, likewise leagues at the time (still legitimate, just not in regular use), that you don't understand NM (or nmi) and presumably therefore knots is not an error by the author.
Aaron
I understand nautical miles and knots perfectly well. My comment about Jules Verne was, as you can see, about the original post, plus the figure of 1791 nautical miles which came up subsequently. It didn't match the original figure of 2,883 kilometres, nor the second number which was 3,218 km. (1791 NM is equivalent to 3317 km)

Here is the original set of numbers. I have highlighted the obvious conflict:-

A man has just completed a 157 day, 1,791 mile swim around Britain.
He covered 2,883 km.
He consumed 15,000 calories a day, equivalent to 58 Big Macs.
He used 3 kg of Vaseline.
He swam 3,218 km, which is the equivalent of 64,373 lengths of an Olympic swimming pool.
( and no; I don't know how he covered 2,883 km, but swam 3,218 km).


I think my comment in parenthesis was quite reasonable, and Jules Verne was a legitimate addition to a thread devoted to daft measurements and/or inaccuracies.
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
Here we go again; this time from Nine news:-

"An asteroid larger than six rugby league fields will pass by Earth next month.
Asteroid 2000 QW7 is estimated to be between 290 metres and 650 metres in diameter, according to NASA."
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
Nine strikes again:-

"Each year, Australians throw away a colossal 7 million litres of unused paint with containers. That's enough to fill 187,000 wheelie bins or paint the Sydney Harbour Bridge 166 times."
  SinickleBird Chief Train Controller

Location: Qantas Club at Mudgee International Airport
A psychedelic Harbour Bridge!
  neillfarmer Chief Train Controller

Apropos the difference in speeds - years ago 3801 visited Melbourne and ran parallel with R761 from Wodonga.
With the wooden-bodied consist, the "S" circular read "Maximum permissible speed, 80 km/h"
I paced the trains from Longwood to Avenel, and it was 115 to 120 km/h all the way.
The driver of the R was a well known rail historian and steam driver ( sadly, no longer with us) and I was having a yarn with him later. I remarked, "That was a very interesting 80 km/h, Fred!" (name changed). "Oh", he said ingenuously, "was it meant to be kilometres?"
The side topic of trains proven by Valvegear to be exceeding max speed such as 120kph instead of 80kph, reminds me of the rail fan tales of a 38 class doing the ton (supposed 100mph) or at least around 90mph or so it is said, along the Breadalbane straight between Goulburn and Gunning. The 1967 Working Timetable shows the 38 class as 60mph max Campbelltown Junee and 70mph max Junee Albury. Some rail fans claim the very high speeds of their favourite loco were calculated from mile posts or similar and apparently there were inspectors in the loco cabs of these high speed trips. Some documents allow a 10% increase if late or similar situations, but 10% of 60mph in that area is not 80mph or 90mph or 100mph as these assertions date from pre metric era. When asked on various internet forums, these 38 class people say their assertions are correct.
petan
The 90? mph run was timed by several people on that train, I have heard speeds quoted of 87 and 92 mph. Speed limits on special trains in those days were often liberally interpreted and running in the low 70s was common on both the south and short north.
On regular running the timetable was set so that the speed limit was nearly always observed. I have heard that the Newcastle expresses often exceeded the 70mph limit when late but this was a 'watched' train so late running was rare. On the Main South my timings often showed speeds in the low 60s but I didn't ever see speeds in the 70s on regular passenger trains.
Two things need to be remembered; Although the 38s did not have speedometers the drivers were very good judges of speed. The other thing is that at speed the 38s were fairly lively, so good track was needed, something that was not always the case "one sleeper in four is good enough".
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
There is a salt pan the 'equivalent of 66,000 football fields'.

(Whatever) 'weighs more than a cruise ship anchor'.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
The Yanks (National Geographic) are at it again:

Did you know that a prefabricated part of ship weighs the same a 10 bull elephants?
The crane used to move it has a capacity to lift 30 times the above (presumably 300 bull elephants)!
Some other component was weighed in New York taxis.

The above is, of course, in addition to the standard National Geographic units of measurement being Olympic Swimming Pools and Jumbo Jets.

The bloody world (or part/s of it) is getting dumber and dumber by the day.
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
Did you know that a prefabricated part of ship weighs the same a 10 bull elephants?
"YM-Mundrabilla"
Before or after their lunch?
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Another one tonight. Load of an ore train:

'Enough iron ore to make x,xxx cars'.
  Aaron Minister for Railways

Location: University of Adelaide SA
At least those things are more or less measures of weight, especially if they say ‘weighs same as’ or similar. They could do something thoroughly stupid and say ‘weighs x kilograms’ or similar and really confuse people, because no one really knows what a kilogram weighs...
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
At least those things are more or less measures of weight, especially if they say ‘weighs same as’ or similar. They could do something thoroughly stupid and say ‘weighs x kilograms’ or similar and really confuse people, because no one really knows what a kilogram weighs...
Aaron
1kg weighs the weight of a 1L water bottle or only slightly lighter than a 1L milk or other, my kids know this (yes I asked them)

Americans love publishing stats in square feet, pounds and feet because it sounds more dramatic.

Fro example the Tesla Cyber truck can tow 10,000 POUNDS or what ever the number is. 5t for some reason doesn't seem to cut it.
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
Americans love publishing stats in square feet, pounds and feet because it sounds more dramatic.
"RTT_Rules"
I always thought it was because none of them could understand metric units.
  Aaron Minister for Railways

Location: University of Adelaide SA
Americans love the avoirdupois system because they’re not taught/cannot understand metric.

Please RTT, not you too, and your poor kids, they’re really going to struggle when the get to an age or decent understanding of science that they need to relearn what a kilogram is - it’s neither of those things.
  Aaron Minister for Railways

Location: University of Adelaide SA
I have to say, as much as I detest Tesla, at least 10,000 pounds is unambiguous, 5t would be quite so, is that tonne or ton, and if it’s the first, what does that even mean again?
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
At least those things are more or less measures of weight, especially if they say ‘weighs same as’ or similar. They could do something thoroughly stupid and say ‘weighs x kilograms’ or similar and really confuse people, because no one really knows what a kilogram weighs...
1kg weighs the weight of a 1L water bottle or only slightly lighter than a 1L milk or other, my kids know this (yes I asked them)

Americans love publishing stats in square feet, pounds and feet because it sounds more dramatic.

Fro example the Tesla Cyber truck can tow 10,000 POUNDS or what ever the number is. 5t for some reason doesn't seem to cut it.
RTT_Rules
I have no problem with the Yanks weighing/measuring things in their own units for their own consumption but they need to realise that there is a world outside the USA to which their products/films etc are exported.

By all means let them measure things in pounds weight but not in tons or gallons where no one knows whether they are US or Imperial measures. At least 10,000 pounds as a universal measure can convert to a known figure in US tons, Imperial tons or kilograms.

Most times one can only guess/assume whether they are talking US gallons or tons but they 'mix and match' to such an extent that it is often not safe to do so.

Better to stick with weighing trams in hippopotamuses like we do, perhaps. How many hippopotamuses equal a Sydney Harbour Bridge?

It is all so bloody stupid - Aarrrrrrrrrrrrghhhhhhh
  RedEyeExpress Locomotive Driver
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
Americans love the avoirdupois system because they’re not taught/cannot understand metric.

Please RTT, not you too, and your poor kids, they’re really going to struggle when the get to an age or decent understanding of science that they need to relearn what a kilogram is - it’s neither of those things.
Aaron
Arghhhh, yes some of us do know how the kg is derived from Planck's const, but I'll let my 10/14 year olds advance a few more years before I ground them for getting it wrong to the 10th decimal place.

I was referring to the average joe. 1kg = ~1L of water   and more roughly 1L of milk in a 1L milk carton.
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
I have to say, as much as I detest Tesla, at least 10,000 pounds is unambiguous, 5t would be quite so, is that tonne or ton, and if it’s the first, what does that even mean again?
Aaron
Well, if its used in Yanky land, which it normally is then it would be obvious they are referring to the Short ton. The same would apply to when they refer to the Gallon.
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
At least those things are more or less measures of weight, especially if they say ‘weighs same as’ or similar. They could do something thoroughly stupid and say ‘weighs x kilograms’ or similar and really confuse people, because no one really knows what a kilogram weighs...
1kg weighs the weight of a 1L water bottle or only slightly lighter than a 1L milk or other, my kids know this (yes I asked them)

Americans love publishing stats in square feet, pounds and feet because it sounds more dramatic.

Fro example the Tesla Cyber truck can tow 10,000 POUNDS or what ever the number is. 5t for some reason doesn't seem to cut it.
I have no problem with the Yanks weighing/measuring things in their own units for their own consumption but they need to realise that there is a world outside the USA to which their products/films etc are exported.

By all means let them measure things in pounds weight but not in tons or gallons where no one knows whether they are US or Imperial measures. At least 10,000 pounds as a universal measure can convert to a known figure in US tons, Imperial tons or kilograms.

Most times one can only guess/assume whether they are talking US gallons or tons but they 'mix and match' to such an extent that it is often not safe to do so.

Better to stick with weighing trams in hippopotamuses like we do, perhaps. How many hippopotamuses equal a Sydney Harbour Bridge?

It is all so bloody stupid - Aarrrrrrrrrrrrghhhhhhh
Well one day we will use the Star Date system Globally and end these weird and wonderful units and equivalents because aliens won't have a clue.
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
At least those things are more or less measures of weight, especially if they say ‘weighs same as’ or similar. They could do something thoroughly stupid and say ‘weighs x kilograms’ or similar and really confuse people, because no one really knows what a kilogram weighs...
1kg weighs the weight of a 1L water bottle or only slightly lighter than a 1L milk or other, my kids know this (yes I asked them)

Americans love publishing stats in square feet, pounds and feet because it sounds more dramatic.

Fro example the Tesla Cyber truck can tow 10,000 POUNDS or what ever the number is. 5t for some reason doesn't seem to cut it.
I have no problem with the Yanks weighing/measuring things in their own units for their own consumption but they need to realise that there is a world outside the USA to which their products/films etc are exported.

By all means let them measure things in pounds weight but not in tons or gallons where no one knows whether they are US or Imperial measures. At least 10,000 pounds as a universal measure can convert to a known figure in US tons, Imperial tons or kilograms.

Most times one can only guess/assume whether they are talking US gallons or tons but they 'mix and match' to such an extent that it is often not safe to do so.

Better to stick with weighing trams in hippopotamuses like we do, perhaps. How many hippopotamuses equal a Sydney Harbour Bridge?

It is all so bloody stupid - Aarrrrrrrrrrrrghhhhhhh
YM-Mundrabilla
Well one day we will use the Star Date system Globally and end these weird and wonderful units and equivalents because aliens won't have a clue.
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
I have to say, as much as I detest Tesla, at least 10,000 pounds is unambiguous, 5t would be quite so, is that tonne or ton, and if it’s the first, what does that even mean again?
Aaron
Numerous industries have been revolutionized or indeed started by more often than not one company, often driven by one person at the top.
- Henry Ford revolutionised how cars were made.
- Boeing the Passenger jet industry
- Apple changed the mobile phone world,
- After half a century of talk, speculation and false starts to replace hydrocarbons use in the car industry, Tesla came along and has change the car industry forever by re-inventing the EV to make them "cool" and commercially attractive and also went a long way in dealing with the charging issues.

I'm not a fan of Apple, but acknowledge their contribution to the technology today, I think you'll have to acknowledge at some point Tesla has done the same.

Actually proof the hydrocarbon fuelled cars are on the way out (thanks mostly to Tesla) is the seemly weekly announcement of thousands of jobs that will be made redundant by 2025 from the various car companies of late. My rough count is 50,000 world wide by 2025. Obviously these are mostly jobs in Internal combustion engine and gear box development and manufacturing, but what we don't hear is the thousands of jobs in battery supply chain and other industry's.

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