Australian cricketer Cameron Bancroft charged with ball tampering as Steve Smith admits he helped hatch the plan

 
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Australian cricketers confessed to ball tampering in a desperate plot hatched by captain Steve Smith and senior players as they saw the third Test against South Africa slipping away on Saturday.

Batsman Cameron Bancroft was tasked with carrying out the tampering by using yellow sticky tape to pick up "granules" beside the pitch and rub it on the ball to rough it up in an attempt to get it to reverse swing on day three at Newlands.
But Bancroft was caught doing it on the field by television cameras, and then attempted to hide the evidence by shoving the tape down his trousers before he was questioned by umpires.

"The leadership group knew about it," Smith said, admitting he and senior players who he would not name planned the cheating during the lunch break.

"We spoke about it at lunch and I'm not proud of what's happened. It's not within the spirit of the game.

"We spoke about it and thought it was a possible way to get an advantage … poor choice and, yeah, we're deeply regrettable."

The tampering and hiding of the tape was replayed over and over in slow motion and close up, on the big screen at Newlands and on television. Bancroft then confessed.

"I saw an opportunity," Bancroft said, "to potentially use some tape and get some granules from the rough patches of the wicket and try to change the ball condition.

"It didn't work. Once I was sighted on the [stadium] screen I panicked quite a lot, and that resulted in me shoving it [the tape] down my trousers."

The confessions by Smith and Bancroft at the post-day news conference provided the most shocking moment in a series that has contained a multitude of contentious incidents and off-field drama. None as jaw-dropping as this, though.

Bancroft was charged with ball tampering by the match officials and has since admitted to the charge.

It also wasn't revealed if Smith and other players were facing charges of bringing the game into disrepute.
They can be charged under the International Cricket Council code of conduct and bans could be handed out.

Smith said he would not resign as Australia captain.

PHOTO: Australian batsman Cameron Bancroft admitted his guilt. (AAP: Dave Hunt)

'Wrong place at the wrong time'Although ball tampering to various degrees happens in cricket, Smith and Bancroft revealed a conspiracy in the Australian dressing room where senior players discussed how they could cheat to get back in the game and the series, then roped in a young member of the squad to do the deed, and then got caught by television cameras and had to face the music.

Bancroft said he was "in the wrong place at the wrong time" when he got involved.

"You know I was in the vicinity of the area when the leadership group were discussing it and look, I'll be honest with you, I was obviously nervous about it because with hundreds of cameras around there's always a risk, isn't it?" he said.


The scramble to hide their actions exacerbated a low moment in Australian cricket, which has a proud history as one of the stalwarts of the game.

Smith insisted coaches were not involved in the plan in Cape Town and had no knowledge of it, and he declined to name the other players involved.

The team's "leadership group" has previously included vice-captain David Warner, and bowlers Nathan Lyon, Mitchell Starc, and Josh Hazlewood.

"I'm not naming names," Smith said.

He also insisted this was the first time tampering happened on his watch as captain, denying that Australia's big victory in the opening test in Durban, where fast bowler Starc got the ball to reverse swing with deadly effect, was also aided by tampering.

PHOTO: Australian cricket team captain Steve Smith admits part in ball tampering. (AAP: Richard Wainwright)

Using a foreign object to rough up or change the condition of one side of the ball can help it swing in the air, or do other unpredictable things, making it tougher for batsmen to face.

The use of foreign objects to tamper with the ball is strictly prohibited in cricket.

Questions will still be asked now about previous Australia successes, and other moments in this series.
Warner came under scrutiny in the second test in Port Elizabeth for strapping he wore on one of his hands, with suggestions it could change the condition of the ball when he rubbed it with that hand.

"You can ask questions as much as you like but I can promise you that this is the first time that this has happened," Smith said.
"I've made it clear that we're regrettable and we'll move on from this and hopefully we'll learn something from it. I'm embarrassed and I know the boys in the shed are embarrassed as well."
Smith said, "if we weren't caught, I'd still feel incredibly bad about it".

Also subject to scrutiny is how far the Australians went to try and cover up the tampering.

There was movement of players, including Smith, on and off the field in the immediate aftermath of Bancroft's actions being caught on cameras.

Former West Indian fast bowler Michael Holding was part of the International Cricket Council when a ball tampering controversy led to Pakistan abandoning a test against England.

He said the umpires should have taken action against Australia much sooner.

"If you get to the point where you think something is untoward the rules are clear, you change the ball, you give the batting team five runs," he said.

"I was there at the oval with the Pakistan-England test match that was eventually abandoned because Inzamam-ul-Haq was adamant that he had done nothing to the ball.

"All the evidence at the oval is nothing compared to this."

AP/ABC

Sponsored advertisement

  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Smith should resign immediately as captain.
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
Cricket Australia needs to show some guts.
Smith, Warner and Bancroft should be sent home immediately with the match forfeited to South Africa. The three should then be banned for 2 years. Replacements should go to play in the fourth Test; we would probably lose, but I prefer an honest loss to an attempted win by cheating.
In 65 years of watching Test cricket I have never been so disgusted with an Australian team. Bradman and Benaud, to name only two, would be turning in their graves.
Fines do not work - that has been obvious for years. A fine of half a match fee is just petty cash to blokes paid as much as these are. Hit them, and hit them hard; hold them up as the horrible examples they are, and try to recover some respect from the rest of the cricket world.
  mikesyd Chief Commissioner

Location: Lurking
Can't agree more. They should forfeit the current test and go home. Cricket Australia to pay the South Africans for loss of revenue for other games not held. Sponsors should be looking at why they pour money into a tarnished team.

And here I was thinking that it was just the gents from the Sub-Continent that were shady.

The sledging (which I think started in Ian Chappell's day) is bad enough, this tops that off even.
  djf01 Chief Commissioner

Cricket Australia needs to show some guts.
Smith, Warner and Bancroft should be sent home immediately with the match forfeited to South Africa. The three should then be banned for 2 years. Replacements should go to play in the fourth Test; we would probably lose, but I prefer an honest loss to an attempted win by cheating.
In 65 years of watching Test cricket I have never been so disgusted with an Australian team. Bradman and Benaud, to name only two, would be turning in their graves.
Fines do not work - that has been obvious for years. A fine of half a match fee is just petty cash to blokes paid as much as these are. Hit them, and hit them hard; hold them up as the horrible examples they are, and try to recover some respect from the rest of the cricket world.
Valvegear

Bancroft?  No.  1 match suspension at most, appealed and reduced to a suspended sentence or sentence deferred until after the 4th test.  Bancroft is the patsie in all of this.  It's telling that the team "official ball shiner" (a title now seemingly even more appropriate) didn't do this, they delegated to the least experienced player who is struggling to hold his spot.

But in the end, we all know it will be Bancroft who pays the price for this.  His test career is over - but then it probably would have been anyway had he told Smith & co to f*ck off.

What I'd *really* like to know is who the other people are in the "leadership group" who contrived and implemented this plan.  

While not wishing to condone the Aussies behaviour, I think some perspective is needed if it's "just" come from Warner and Smith.  The Sth Africans - team, spectators and administrative officials have acted unconscionably, and (this is the important point) with complete impunity.  Given Rabada's record -  and the fact he was already on some sort of good behaviour bond - he should have been suspended for the send off he gave Smith alone.  But he was allowed to get away with putting the shoulder in on the basis it "might" have been an accident.

If it was just Smith and Warner, then I can kind of understand it.  I don't condone it, but I understand it.  And if this is the case the way the ICC handled (ie green lighted) the Rabada and Sonny Bill incidents they must share in the culpability.

But what concerns me more is the possibility/probability this came from, or was done with the knowledge and approval of, Leehman.  AFAIK, the runner was sent out to warn Bancroft he'd been busted, at which point he tried to hide the evidence.  (I'm not sure of the sequence of events here).  But given what the Aussies were doing with DRS last year, this sort of sharp practice organised from the coach (and selector) is not exactly out of character.

In any case, (at least) one of Leehman or Smith needs to be permanently relieved of their duties.  But the last thing I want to see is the instigator of this rewarded with a promotion.  If Warner is equally culpable, it would be a travesty if he were awarded the Test Captaincy as a result - even if it is just for one test.  Equally, I don't want to see a captain take the fall for his coach (or visa-versa).

Also, given the pay dispute last year, I doubt we're likely to see the players show any confidence in Cricket Australia (CA) - or visa versa.  So I don't know we are ever going to get to the bottom of this.  

If I were Bancroft, I'd be getting a lawyer, and I'd be offering to spill my guts to either CA (in return for a *long* contract), and failing that, the media.  

So, what the ACB should do is get their anti-corruption unit over there ASAP to talk to all the players individually.  1 match ban and no further sanctions for those that fess up (*and* finger the others), 1 year ban for those identified as being involved but denied it.

Warner needs to be (at least) temporarily suspended from Vice Captaincy and not be captain for the next test, as I find it implausible that he had no knowledge of this given his usual role in "preparing" the ball.

Ponting (who is on the CA staff as an assistant coach) brought in as interim head coach while Leehman stands aside pending the outcome of a full investigation.

But also, I think CA need to get on the front foot a bit, and take the ICC to the court of arbitration of sport over the Rabada shouldering matter.  Can't see them having the balls to do that though.

As for Smith, I think he probably needs to be relieved of the Captaincy.  But I think there are also probably mitigating circumstances.  If it emerges that he was ordered to Leehman and/or CA management to front the media and take the fall on his own, or he was acting under instructions from the coach or management in the tampering incident, then a 1 test match (and IPL season) suspension without loss of the captaincy might be more appropriate.
  LancedDendrite Chief Commissioner

Location: Trapped in a meeting with Rhonda and Karsten
Smith and the rest of the 'leadership group' should all have to demonstrate to Cricket Australia why they should not be indefinitely banned from playing first class cricket. Coach Darren Lehmann should have his contract torn up.

A line in the sand needs to be drawn.
  bingley hall Minister for Railways

Location: Last train to Skaville
Cricket Australia needs to show some guts.
Smith, Warner and Bancroft should be sent home immediately with the match forfeited to South Africa. The three should then be banned for 2 years. Replacements should go to play in the fourth Test; we would probably lose, but I prefer an honest loss to an attempted win by cheating.
In 65 years of watching Test cricket I have never been so disgusted with an Australian team. Bradman and Benaud, to name only two, would be turning in their graves.
Fines do not work - that has been obvious for years. A fine of half a match fee is just petty cash to blokes paid as much as these are. Hit them, and hit them hard; hold them up as the horrible examples they are, and try to recover some respect from the rest of the cricket world.

While not wishing to condone the Aussies behaviour, I think some perspective is needed if it's "just" come from Warner and Smith.  The Sth Africans - team, spectators and administrative officials have acted unconscionably, and (this is the important point) with complete impunity.  Given Rabada's record -  and the fact he was already on some sort of good behaviour bond - he should have been suspended for the send off he gave Smith alone.  But he was allowed to get away with putting the shoulder in on the basis it "might" have been an accident.

If it was just Smith and Warner, then I can kind of understand it.  I don't condone it, but I understand it.  And if this is the case the way the ICC handled (ie green lighted) the Rabada and Sonny Bill incidents they must share in the culpability.

......
djf01

The ICC gave no one a green light. The ICC suspended Rabada.

Due process allows an appeal and the ICC decision was overturned by an independent commissioner.

To be fair, even Steve Smith was too thick to work that one out Razz
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
Smith should resign immediately as captain.
bevans
Don't let him have an "easy out", He should be sacked immediately!
  Dangersdan707 Chief Commissioner

Location: On a Thing with Internet

Rolling Eyes This Is Railpage Australia™ Not cricket page, when is there going to be a cricket section of the forums! also Please speak English for us 'normal' people that are 'unaustralian'.
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
Rolling Eyes This Is Railpage Australia™ Not cricket page, when is there going to be a cricket section of the forums! also Please speak English for us 'normal' people that are 'unaustralian'.
Dangersdan707
This thread IS in the Lounge section, where all other cricket or sport based threads have always been.
  bingley hall Minister for Railways

Location: Last train to Skaville
Rolling Eyes This Is Railpage Australia™ Not cricket page, when is there going to be a cricket section of the forums! also Please speak English for us 'normal' people that are 'unaustralian'.
This thread IS in the Lounge section, where all other cricket or sport based threads have always been.
Pressman

I think Stonerdan707 is just trying to wind us up.
  Carnot Chief Commissioner

Could not have come at a worse time for Criggit Oztrailier. They told the media to re-submit on the their rights bids the other day....

And the current Leadership Team? They're not leaders. They're the opposite.
  LancedDendrite Chief Commissioner

Location: Trapped in a meeting with Rhonda and Karsten
Rohan Connolly's article is well worth a read: https://thenewdaily.com.au/sport/cricket/2018/03/25/cameron-bancroft-ball-tampering/
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
I'm afraid that djf01's spirited attempted defence of "South Africa was naughty too" just does not stack up.
AUSTRALIA CHEATED.  That is a fact; like it or not.
It should be punished with the utmost severity. Warne was banned for a year for a drug offence; Smith and Warner deserve more.
And Rabada? What does he have to do with this? Absolutely nothing. Bringing him into the discussion is the height of irrelevance.
To djf01 - we know you are passionate about Australian cricket, but please don't go looking for excuses. There are none.

And Bancroft - he is a big boy - he's playing Test cricket. If he doesn't know the Laws of Cricket he shouldn't be out there. The idea that he would be dropped if he refused to carry out an unlawful command from Smith is ludicrous. For starters, Smith is not a selector. Secondly, Bancroft, if he had any sense at all, would spill the beans; I certainly would. Smith would look even worse than he does now, and he's already suffering from a good case of self-inflicted wounds.
He has used the well worn "error of judgement" excuse. Rubbish! An error of judgement is using the wrong bowler or chasing a wide delivery to be caught in the slips. This was premeditated cheating for which there is no excuse whatsoever.

Edit: Another thing I would like to see is the sponsors associated with Cricket Australia immediately withdrawing their support.
  bingley hall Minister for Railways

Location: Last train to Skaville
I forgot my most important comment.......

IT'S AN OUTRAGE Razz
  Big J Assistant Commissioner

Location: In Paradise
Absolute disgrace. I do feel some way for Bancroft as it obvious that the current "leadership" group are morally bankrupt. He is carrying out what was expected of him. The "leadership" needs to be held to account. As others have said, I think Smith should be sacked (not resigned). Others should if they were in the know and condoned this, should also be held to account, irrespective if this wrecks the current tour.

I note that CA have dispatched their man to investigate and due process should follow.

In the interim, we should forfeit this test. While in the scheme of things, the ball tampering probably didn't make much difference in the game, this issue is the way that this rabble like to spruik the moral high ground to other nations has revealed the hypocrites they are.

I am ashamed that this group has tarnished our love for this game. The fact our "leadership" thought it would be ok to bend the rules is an indictment of where we are. Of course I am not naive to think that other countries don't try this type of rubbish, but the fact that we do generally have an attitude of play hard, but play fair, has been severely tarnished in the world's eyes.

This will hurt the game in Australia. I am not happy with that, as I love the game.

It will take some restitution to fix our reputation again. Look how long the under arm incident has taken to heal.
  Greensleeves Chief Commissioner

Location: If it isn't obvious by now, it should be.
Edit: Another thing I would like to see is the sponsors associated with Cricket Australia immediately withdrawing their support.
Valvegear

That's probably my biggest hope for the fallout from this, that the sponsors call it quits with both CA and players involved. A sudden lack of sponsorship money will get the message across that this behaviour isn't on. Being banned from a few matches won't hurt them that much, it's just a slap on the wrist.
  djf01 Chief Commissioner

I'm afraid that djf01's spirited attempted defence of "South Africa was naughty too" just does not stack up.
AUSTRALIA CHEATED.  That is a fact; like it or not.
Valvegear

Yes, it's a fact, and you are right, I don't like it.

I was just pointing out Smith made the comment in the press conference after Rabada was cleared (or had his charge downgraded) that "this sets a precedent" - or - as far as he was concerned that if one side was going to be allowed to get away with level 2 code violations (a higher grade offence that ball tampering) with the ICC's endorsement - he didn't see any reason why he should be bound by "the rules" either.

I stress again, I don't wish to condone the Aussie's behaviour, I fully agree it was cheating, and should be dealt with as such. But with hindsight, the signs were there in Smith's previous press conferences.

The *but* is - where did this come from?  If Leehman was the instigator, then IMHO the Nuremberg defence does carry some weight, and Smith and Warner should be looking at the ICC penalty (1 match) and loss of Captaincy and Vice Captaincy.  If they cooked it up on their own and genuinely concealed it from Leehman (which I doubt), then 1yr bans are in order, and Boof's penalty should be the period of "leave without pay".  If they all did it together, 1 year for Warner & Smith, and Boof gets the sack.


It should be punished with the utmost severity. Warne was banned for a year for a drug offence; Smith and Warner deserve more.
Valvegear

Warne deserved more.  His infringement typically warrants a 2yr ban - or 3 mths if his BS story (it's my mum's fault!) was believed.


And Rabada? What does he have to do with this? Absolutely nothing. Bringing him into the discussion is the height of irrelevance.
Valvegear


You have to remember, in the previous test match, Smith was the victim of an assault by Rabada, who subsequently escaped without sanction as a result of the ICC "due process" (where the key witness to and victim of Rabada's behaviour, Smith, wasn't even called to give evidence).  Smith was clearly aggrieved by this, and understandably so IMHO.

So IMHO the ICC sent a clear and unambiguous message to Smith that their code of conduct is a load of horse sh*t, no-one else is bound by it, so why should he?

I think this context is *very* significant, not in terms of guilt, but in terms of sentencing.  

And I should also stress, this is why Smith should be looking at a 1yr rather than 4yr or life ban IMHO.

I should also stress that this is contingent on this being the first instance.  As I understand it, there was some suggestion Warner was using his hand strapping to rough up the ball in the 1st test.  If that turns out to be the case, then all bets are off as far as I'm concerned.  If it emerges there has been systematic corruption (hard to believe given how incompetent the cheating has been so far) then it needs to be weeded out of the sport, regardless of the records of the players.


And Bancroft - he is a big boy - he's playing Test cricket. If he doesn't know the Laws of Cricket he shouldn't be out there. The idea that he would be dropped if he refused to carry out an unlawful command from Smith is ludicrous.
Valvegear

Sorry @Valvegear, I don't buy this for a second.

Recent history shows being a "team player" (which would now appear to mean going along with cheating) is an important requirement of selection - and non-selection - these days.  Peter Neville's non-selection and Maxwell's non-selection in ODIs is testament to that.  Simon Katich a not so recent example.

Further, what if Leehman (coach *and* selector) had knowledge of, and had condoned this behaviour?  (Something I think is highly probable).  And what if Bancroft believed this was the case?  You can't tell a selector "f*ck you and f*ck the team, I'll do what *I* think is right thank you" and expect to remain in the team.  IMHO the extent to which this is a mitigating circumstance depends on Leehman's role - or Bancroft's perception of it.

Again, this goes to culpability, not guilt.

It's why I think Bancroft should be looking at 1 match rather than 1 year - provided he fingers *all* the a-holes who put him up to it.

FWIW, the fact "expendable" Bancroft was the patsie actually doing this makes this whole thing so much worse.  It's this, more so than the cheating, which makes Smith's position as captain untenable.


To djf01 - we know you are passionate about Australian cricket, but please don't go looking for excuses. There are none.
Valvegear



He has used the well worn "error of judgement" excuse. Rubbish! An error of judgement is using the wrong bowler or chasing a wide delivery to be caught in the slips. This was premeditated cheating for which there is no excuse whatsoever.
Valvegear


Also, FWIW, I don't buy this "error of judgement" BS either.  

This was not an error of judgement, it was a decision by the Aussie "team leadership" to cheat.  But it was also a decision by the Aussie "team leadership" to do so by compromising a junior player in the side - something which I think needs to be taken into account when dishing out the penalties.

If Bancroft said "error of judgement" (I take your word for it that he did, I haven't checked), it can only be because he was "advised" (ie instructed) to by the "team leadership".
  BrentonGolding Chief Commissioner

Location: Maldon Junction
While I agree that this incident is shameful and a blight on Australia cricket there have been plenty of examples of ball tampering over the years including a couple of notable ones by South African players.

Some of the more notable are detailed in this SMH article

https://www.smh.com.au/sport/cricket/not-what-it-seams-a-brief-history-of-ball-tampering-20180325-p4z645.html

Like most cases the worst part of the Bancroft case is that the players tried to cover it up once caught instead of just fessing up and saying yes, I am an idiot, I did it.

BG
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
If Bancroft said "error of judgement" (I take your word for it that he did, I haven't checked), it can only be because he was "advised" (ie instructed) to by the "team leadership".
"djf01"

It was Smith who said "error of judgement"; not Bancroft.
Regardless of why Bancroft did it, he is guilty, and he knows right from wrong. Cheating to keep his place in the side is not an excuse.

I was just pointing out Smith made the comment in the press conference after Rabada was cleared (or had his charge downgraded) that "this sets a precedent" - or - as far as he was concerned that if one side was going to be allowed to get away with level 2 code violations (a higher grade offence that ball tampering) with the ICC's endorsement - he didn't see any reason why he should be bound by "the rules" either.You have to remember, in the previous test match, Smith was the victim of an assault by Rabada, who subsequently escaped without sanction as a result of the ICC "due process" (where the key witness to and victim of Rabada's behaviour, Smith, wasn't even called to give evidence).  Smith was clearly aggrieved by this, and understandably so IMHO.
"djf01"
 In a word; irrelevant. You're sounding like an 11 year old schoolboy, "Sir, but look what he did."  What someone else did does not matter.  

So IMHO the ICC sent a clear and unambiguous message to Smith that their code of conduct is a load of horse sh*t, no-one else is bound by it, so why should he?
"djf01"
 Simple. (a) Ball tampering is not a Code of Conduct violation. Ball tampering is an offence written into the Laws of Cricket, and (b) I say again; what happened anywhere else doe not matter in this context.

Smith, Warner and Bancroft  (and Lehman who, if he did not know, should have) have done irreparable damage to Australian cricket. As some else has written, look how long the underarm incident has been remembered, and underarm was not illegal at the time.  Ball tampering is illegal - it is a breach of the Laws. Australians have a fine record of pointing the righteous finger at teams from other countries, all of whom are now entitled to hurl heaps of condemnation on Australia.

Please; I say again; stop looking for mitigating circumstances and excuses because there are none, repeat none.
  bingley hall Minister for Railways

Location: Last train to Skaville
While I agree that this incident is shameful and a blight on Australia cricket there have been plenty of examples of ball tampering over the years including a couple of notable ones by South African players.
.......

BG
BrentonGolding

And who shouts the loudest when these occur Laughing
  MetroFemme Chief Train Controller

Smith and Warner loose the captaincy for the remainder of the test.

I hope they are not reinstated. This is shocking and not what Australia should be doing.
  djf01 Chief Commissioner

Simple. (a) Ball tampering is not a Code of Conduct violation. Ball tampering is an offence written into the Laws of Cricket, and (b) I say again; what happened anywhere else doe not matter in this context.
Valvegear

For which the official penalty by the laws of the game is 5 runs - the same as catching a ball in your hat.  (IIRC the laws say the matter is also referred to the particular game's organising body - I'll have to check that).

If we are to go just by the laws of the game, SA should get 5 runs and a replacement ball, and the matter should end there.

The codes of conduct (which unlike the laws of the game, I'm not familiar with) outline the fines and bans.  


Please; I say again; stop looking for mitigating circumstances and excuses because there are none, repeat none.


There are no excuses.  

Mitigating circumstances are not excuses, they go toward how the guilty parties are punished, not whether their conduct is acceptable.  

What they've done is not acceptable.  We are all agreed on that.
  justapassenger Chief Commissioner

Steps that I believe be taken:

1. Smith, Warner and Bancroft withdrawn from the present match, result forfeited and play to continue as an exhibition match with other Australian squad players substituting for the withdrawn players to put on a full match for the fans.

2. Australia to demand that the Fourth Test be played by two teams of players with completely clean ICC disciplinary records, or the team gets on the plane and flies home. Cricket Australia needs to accept what they deserve, but there is no way that South Africa deserves an unrestricted run at the moral high ground.

3. Smith, Warner and Bancroft's CA contracts to be immediately subject to an indefinite suspension without pay.

It should be punished with the utmost severity. Warne was banned for a year for a drug offence; Smith and Warner deserve more.

Warne deserved more.  His infringement typically warrants a 2yr ban - or 3 mths if his BS story (it's my mum's fault!) was believed.
djf01
Warne's one year ban was the full suspension which could be applied for that positive under the anti-doping rules of the time, only since the 2015 version of the WADA Code came in would it be two years.

Under the 2015 version of the WADA Code, the standard suspension which would be applicable to an athlete testing positive to a Specified Substance like Warne did would be two years. For a Non-Specified Substance (e.g. EPO, clenbuterol, testosterone, GHRP) the standard suspension is four years.

Sanctions can be reduced if the athlete admitting a rule violation before it was fully proven (Collingwood AFL players Lachie Keeffe and Josh Thomas got their four year suspensions for clenbuterol use discounted to two years under this provision, an option which would be available to Warne if the whole scenario was to be repeated under the current rules), the athlete assists in securing sanctions for other dopers, or the athlete showing they had a reduced level of fault/negligence.

Cricket is not a sport that takes anti-doping seriously, as judgement and sanctioning is administered by the same national boards which select international teams rather than an independent anti-doping tribunal. While CA handled the Warne case correctly according to the rules at the time, the West Indies Cricket Board did completely the opposite last year when they let off Andre Russell with just a one year ban for what should have been four years.

As a cycling fan, I have unfortunately had more reasons to acquire knowledge about the operation of the anti-doping system than fans of sports which take the issue less seriously.
  justapassenger Chief Commissioner

Simple. (a) Ball tampering is not a Code of Conduct violation. Ball tampering is an offence written into the Laws of Cricket, and (b) I say again; what happened anywhere else doe not matter in this context.
Valvegear

For which the official penalty by the laws of the game is 5 runs - the same as catching a ball in your hat.  (IIRC the laws say the matter is also referred to the particular game's organising body - I'll have to check that).
djf01
Ball tampering is both a breach of Law 41 and a Level 2 violation under the ICC Code of Conduct.

It is many years since the MCC Laws themselves have had any force in organised cricket. The Laws as published by the MCC are these days treated as boilerplate text, a template for each governing body to incorporate into the Playing Conditions for each of the competitions they run and then add extra provisions on top such as the rules for the Decision Review System, equipment regulations etc.

The template text in the Laws as published by the MCC reads:
The umpires together shall report the occurrence as soon as possible after the match to the Executive of the offending side and to any Governing Body responsible for the match, who shall take such action as is considered appropriate against the captain, any other individuals concerned and, if appropriate, the team.
MCC

The relevant text in the Men's Test Match Playing Conditions, which also incorporates text stating that the ICC Code of Conduct applies in Tests, reads:
The umpires shall then report the matter to the ICC Match Referee who shall take such action as is considered appropriate against the player(s) concerned.
ICC

The equivalent text in the Playing Conditions for the Sheffield Shield and Futures League, as an example, reads:
JThe umpires together shall report the matter under the Code of Conduct as soon as possible after the day’s play to the Match Referee, who shall take such action as is considered appropriate against the person/s concerned.
Cricket Australia

Sponsored advertisement

Display from:   

Quick Reply

We've disabled Quick Reply for this thread as it was last updated more than six months ago.