Load Shedding in Victoria - 25/01/2019

 
  wobert Chief Commissioner

Location: Half way between Propodolla and Kinimakatka
Funny, I"ve never wondered that at all.

Sponsored advertisement

  574M White Guru

Location: Shepparton
We were load shed in Shepparton - for three hours - and looking at Powercor's map, they sure selected a lot of North East Victoria with temps up in the 43°-47° range. Some farmers complained about their hot cows, others complained about the water pump not working, and still others could not have a cold shower, etc, no water.

It affects everyone differently.

Everyone except the Federal Government, that is.

Real people suffer.

I normally don't go after governments, but this short-sighted policy of the Feds and shutting down the Climate Change Institute and carbon trading has us, the ordinary, everyday Australian, suffering.

Load shedding in regional Australia when the temps are 43°-47° are sure not on the agenda of the Canberra Bubble.

Nosireee. No sir. No way, not even in Holland.

A thank-you to Dirty Ballast for spelling things out clearly in Yallourn and Loy Yang.
  BigShunter Chief Commissioner

Location: St Clair. S.A.
Meanwhile we have an unreliable electricity supply and people around my area are forced to shut their businesses and lose income because we are load shedded off the grid.

Great effort all, well done, keep talking, posting your propoganda, that will really help us get back our produce, lost income etc etc.

BG
BrentonGolding
Unreliable power supply or the Dorks controlling the supply and choosing who's going to miss out, when there're flogging power off, to another state !

BigShunter.
  mikesyd Chief Commissioner

Location: Lurking
We were load shed in Shepparton - for three hours - and looking at Powercor's map, they sure selected a lot of North East Victoria with temps up in the 43°-47° range. Some farmers complained about their hot cows, others complained about the water pump not working, and still others could not have a cold shower, etc, no water.

It affects everyone differently.

Everyone except the Federal Government, that is.

Real people suffer.

I normally don't go after governments, but this short-sighted policy of the Feds and shutting down the Climate Change Institute and carbon trading has us, the ordinary, everyday Australian, suffering.

Load shedding in regional Australia when the temps are 43°-47° are sure not on the agenda of the Canberra Bubble.

Nosireee. No sir. No way, not even in Holland.

A thank-you to Dirty Ballast for spelling things out clearly in Yallourn and Loy Yang.
574M
Regarding the Dutch link - the question is, are they getting their power direct from the Turbines/Windmills, or are they just generating an equivalent or more than the Railways there use and feeding it into the grid?
  mikesyd Chief Commissioner

Location: Lurking
I guess that if Load Shedding were to be used in Canberra, then the Parliament area would be left out of the pain (notwithstanding that they probably have their own generators in the basement in any case).

Cant have the pollies wearing the pain of course.
  DirtyBallast Chief Commissioner

Location: I was here first. You're only visiting.
Appreciate the comments about the issues with the coal power stations. Next time stick to the facts (TRUTH) on the rest and no need for spin!
RTT_Rules
So, why did YOU?

I'll tell you why.

It's because you denounce everything that doesn't fit your schema.

EVERYthing I wrote was easily verified cold hard fact, apart from the dig I made at your hyperbole regarding a replacement for Hazelwood.
  wobert Chief Commissioner

Location: Half way between Propodolla and Kinimakatka
Don't think I've ever heard/seen the word schema before, so I had to look it up,...... nice one
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
Appreciate the comments about the issues with the coal power stations. Next time stick to the facts (TRUTH) on the rest and no need for spin!
So, why did YOU?

I'll tell you why.

It's because you denounce everything that doesn't fit your schema.

EVERYthing I wrote was easily verified cold hard fact, apart from the dig I made at your hyperbole regarding a replacement for Hazelwood.
DirtyBallast
What a pile of crap DB

You said I think it takes 3mth to build a coal fired power station, I have no idea where you got that thought bubble from.

You said or at least indicated that NSW wouldn't be importing power when it has surplus generation, I said, look at AEMO site.

You said wind is predictable, yes it is, but pointless if not when you need it.

I never argued or stated anything about or against Hazellwood other than it needed a part replacement when it was annouced to be closed. Nothing was planned then or since apart from blind faith in wind and solar. The needs probably around 800MW to ensue Vic has a reliable power supply and doesn't drop below that of some 3rd world countries in power reliability, like SA.

As I said before, follow your own comments and stick to the facts, not a ideology or even schema!
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
Don't think I've ever heard/seen the word schema before, so I had to look it up,...... nice one
wobert
Because its above your pay grade!
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
We were load shed in Shepparton - for three hours - and looking at Powercor's map, they sure selected a lot of North East Victoria with temps up in the 43°-47° range. Some farmers complained about their hot cows, others complained about the water pump not working, and still others could not have a cold shower, etc, no water.

It affects everyone differently.

Everyone except the Federal Government, that is.

Real people suffer.

I normally don't go after governments, but this short-sighted policy of the Feds and shutting down the Climate Change Institute and carbon trading has us, the ordinary, everyday Australian, suffering.

Load shedding in regional Australia when the temps are 43°-47° are sure not on the agenda of the Canberra Bubble.

Nosireee. No sir. No way, not even in Holland.

A thank-you to Dirty Ballast for spelling things out clearly in Yallourn and Loy Yang.
574M
Dutch trains are not running off 100% wind, they simply pay for the equivalent amount of power they use from wind. Even the best North sea off shore wind farms are less 45% capacity factor, so 55% of the time they source power from other sources to supply the railway, otherwise Dutch trains would be as reliable as your power supply today!

~81% (2012) of the Netherlands power is from fossil fuels, ~3% nuclear, ~15% imported (but dropping), wind and solar making up loose change. Currently the Netherlands has about same amount of wind power capacity as Australia, around 4GW.

Ironically the Netherlands also built not 1, not 2, but 3 coal fired generational units in last 2-3 years, total about 2000MW or so to replace older units closing down, HELLO Victoria and NSW!

"....according to the government the remaining five plants should stay open because the Netherlands depends on the energy produced by these coal-fired plants."https://nos.nl/artikel/2100426-ondanks-klimaatakkoord-nieuwe-kolencentrale-nog-zonder-co2-afvang.html

Be-careful about the PR hype and the science wins everytime!
  wobert Chief Commissioner

Location: Half way between Propodolla and Kinimakatka
Don't think I've ever heard/seen the word schema before, so I had to look it up,...... nice one
Because its above your pay grade!
RTT_Rules
Really, since you've broken about half a million irony meters in the last six months.( snigger snigger)
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
Don't think I've ever heard/seen the word schema before, so I had to look it up,...... nice one
Because its above your pay grade!
Really, since you've broken about half a million irony meters in the last six months.( snigger snigger)
wobert
Again Wobert you have proven yet again that you have nothing of substance to add to a thread, just riding the personal attacks BS train!

Just for once, just once I would like to see an actual comment from you that is on topic, but I suspect you are using all this BS to hide behind the fact you don't know the different between a MW and a Mb.
  djf01 Chief Commissioner

Let's look at some actual truths.

... electricity was still flowing to NSW from Victoria. Really. This, despite lots of spare capacity available in NSW.
DirtyBallast

I was trying to figure out how to see the history of the flows and constraints on the NSW-VIC interconnects in the AEMO data, but to be perfectly honest, I'm not that interested to go to so much trouble.

My understanding is these interconnects operate within configurable ranges, and the actual amount determined by the market - to the extent that is possible by the current configuration.  The configs can't be changed quickly, and lots of local factors impact the possible configs.

There was a small LOR event on 24th, that resulted in the Alcoa plant at Portland shedding 100MW.  On another site I follow someone noted the pending shortfall in reserve yesterday (25/1) in Vic, yet the VIC-NSW interconnect was still shifting 200MW (the configured minimum constraint) from Vic to NSW at ~10:30.  By 12:00 and the start of load shedding they had the limit back to zero.

I also understand there are numerous local technical issues that can restrict the capability of the interconnecter - of which I clearly have a very limited understanding.  

But by way of analogy rather than fact, the way I understand it is there are 330k transmission lines connecting snowy hydro with the Vic and NSW networks.  These can be used to exchange power between the two grids.  But if snowy is running flat out - as it was by the VIC load shedding event, then it can't send (as much) extra power to VIC from NSW.

I'm very curious to know exactly why NSW/QLD excess capacity was not available in Victoria, if this was a stuff-up, or simply a limitation of the transmission grid.
  wobert Chief Commissioner

Location: Half way between Propodolla and Kinimakatka
Sigh, you seem to be immune to facts, that don't fit your schema. But carry on, keeps us amused, I'll just go and get another irony meter.
  djf01 Chief Commissioner

The situation will be even worse when Liddel closes.

The SE corner needs a replacement baseload 2000MW power station.
RTT_Rules

I read an interesting analysis that suggested the incident in VIC yesterday could have been much worse.  During load shedding SA was exporting 600MW to VIC (basically as much as it could).  And a cool change swept through Melbourne that meant the VIC load was up to 1400MW lower than anticipated - or could have been.  

Had it been hot in SA and Vic concurrently (not exactly unheard of), this event could have been very widespread indeed.

But does the SE need 2000MW of baseload?  Absolutely not.

It needs 2000MW of additional peakload.

Ideally this generation would also be:
  • sufficiently distributed to not require massive/any upgrades to the transmission and distribution grids just to cope with a few hots days a year.  
  • bias toward generating during peak: times of day, seasons, weather (ie hot & sunny).  
  • end users were prepared to pay the capital cost upfront themselves rather than "the industry" sticking their hand out to demand more from the taxpayer.

Remind you of anything?
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
Let's look at some actual truths.

... electricity was still flowing to NSW from Victoria. Really. This, despite lots of spare capacity available in NSW.

I was trying to figure out how to see the history of the flows and constraints on the NSW-VIC interconnects in the AEMO data, but to be perfectly honest, I'm not that interested to go to so much trouble.

My understanding is these interconnect operate within configurable ranges, and the actual amount determined by the market - to the extent that is possible by the current configuration.

There was a small LOR event on 24th, that resulted in the Alcoa plant at Portland shedding 100MW.  On another site I follow someone noted the pending shortfall in reserve yesterday (25/1) in Vic, yet the VIC-NSW interconnect was still shifting 200MW (the configured minimum constraint) from Vic to NSW at ~10:30.  By 12:00 and the start of load shedding they had the limit back to zero.

I also understand there are numerous local technical issues that can restrict the capability of the interconnecter - of which I clearly have a very limited understanding.  

But by way of analogy rather than fact, the way I understand it is there are 330k transmission lines connecting snowy hydro with the Vic and NSW networks.  These can be used to exchange power between the two grids.  But if snowy is running flat out - as it was by the VIC load shedding event, then it can't send 9as much) extra power to VIC from NSW.

I'm very curious to know exactly why NSW/QLD excess capacity was not available in Victoria, if this was a stuff-up, or simply a limitation of the transmission grid.
djf01
Agree,
Following the AEMO dashboard page, the range of power that can be shifted and what makes it go red does seem to change. Not sure why and like you I have no idea how it all works, I just follow the number of MW going from one state to the next.

NSW may have excess generation capacity, but it doesn't seem to use it, rather bringing in power from Qld, averaging 0.5 to 2GW depending on demand. Its very very rare to see power headed north. Even on peak days I've gone through each of the coal fired generators and found them on average less than 90%, but go to Qld and they are all running flat out right up to Gladstone, Stanwell and Caliide. Right now NSW is pulling 1300MW from Qld and a small amount from Vic although Vic is pulling 200MW from SA.

Having following the grid now for over a year, looking at the various generators, it seems Qld and Vic run their coal power stations at or near capacity when demand is there (mostly everything but night and mid morning on weekends due to solar) and NSW is a throttle for its own needs. Maybe others know more?

Snowy scheme is now part of the NSW grid on the AEMO website, it was changed from its own universe a few years back and there is a reference on their website to this. So if there was power moving from Vic into NSW, this is on top of what the Snowy is delivering.

The worst/sad part about all this is that on Sat lunch, every state bar Qld has a wholesale power price over $100MWh, It should be half that.
  neillfarmer Chief Train Controller

Once upon a time each State Government took on the responsibility for providing power for its own state. Everything was fine except for when the miners went on strike. Then the Snowy Mountains Scheme came along and fed power to NSW and Victoria. That was still ok because the politicians and state quangos could still get their brains around how that worked.

Then along comes the smart people who said that private ownership and competition would keep prices lower. What they didn't admit was that this was a lie and that they really wanted the proceeds of the sales to squander on their pork barrelling and to allow their mates in high places to rip the population off with 'wink, wink no collusion here' pricing.

We now have a fragmented system where nobody takes responsibility for ensuring we have enough power, where individual states knowingly reduce capacity on ideological whims, and expected somebody else to help them out because we are the 'good climate conscious people'. Worse still power generators have no incentive to supply and so we get ridiculous situations where units are taken out by generators who know that the resulting higher price will benefit them. It is a rotten unworkable mess.

We need to get back to the situation where each state is responsible for providing power for its people and industry. By that way a reliable supply and the ensuing penalties through the ballot box can work.
That does not mean that SA and Victoria have to use brown coal generation, they can contract a permanent supply from black coal or gas or what ever from interstate, but that is their responsibility to arrange.
Individual states are also free to subsidise eco power however they like, but they cop the responsibility of back-up if the eco stuff is not available.

There are other models that would work, such as a National System, but it is fundamental that some structure be used that clearly sets out who has the responsibility, and authority for construction if need be, for the supply of reliable power. Eco power can be included and encouraged but this doesn't alleviate the prime requirement of reliable power.

The current situation reminds me of the birds I feed at home. They would rather spend time squabbling than actually getting in and eating.

Yes, what a mess all caused by bird brained politicians who have abrogated their responsibility to the people.

Neill
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
Agree, the market is too small for the competitive bidding process to work effectively without manipulation in its current form.

RE supply should be required to bid it's quote as dispatchable, in that they must supply.

Base load suppliers must declare their assets availability and been penalised for non supply.
  potatoinmymouth Chief Commissioner

Agree, the market is too small for the competitive bidding process to work effectively without manipulation in its current form. RE supply should be required to bid it's quote as dispatchable, in that they must supply. Base load suppliers must declare their assets availability and been penalised for non supply.
RTT_Rules

Talk about deliberately missing the point to ride your hobby horse further down the road.

RE is not dispatchable (well, not wind and solar anyway) and forcing the market to treat it as such would be idiotic to put it bluntly. Do you want more expensive electricity? That's how you get more expensive electricity. Similarly, "base load" power is a fiction invented to justify the continued existence of non-dispatchable power supplies in an era that has the technology to move past them.

Neill's point was that a central authority of some description that can say at any time of day or night "fire up the Bobsville gas plant, we're heading into a four hour peak load" or "get the Smithtown battery ready to go, everyone's about to put the kettle on for half time at the grand final" or "geez it's blowing a gale in Fredburg, ask NSW if they need any help and if not we can power down the Woop-Woop coal plant for the night" can also PLAN a system that will actually bloody work, tell everyone in advance what the price of power will be to cover the costs of building the generation capacity, work towards cleaner power without blowing up the economy, AND build a distribution network that can actually cope.

You can't plan a "free" market, that's the whole bloody point. It should be abundantly clear to all concerned by now that electricity desperately needs planning. By all means franchise out the power stations if you must, and have competitive bidding for network maintenance contracts if you want the private sector involved, but take back control before it all goes down the gurgler.
  BrentonGolding Chief Commissioner

Location: Maldon Junction
You can't plan a "free" market, that's the whole bloody point. It should be abundantly clear to all concerned by now that electricity desperately needs planning. By all means franchise out the power stations if you must, and have competitive bidding for network maintenance contracts if you want the private sector involved, but take back control before it all goes down the gurgler.
potatoinmymouth
We need planning AND we need leadership to go with it. The current system is simply not working.

Electricity was traditionally a State responsibility. This is no longer working in the modern age.Yesterday could have been a disaster if SA and NSW had been as hot as Vic and we did not get a strong cool change in the early afternoon. And even so do we think it is OK for some of our biggest businesses to be asked to (read paid to) slow or cease their economic activity just to keep the air con on and for tens of thousands of customers to experience load shedding, thousands of small businesses forced to close etc etc.

The whole system needs to be re-imagined for the current circumstances. I am all for RE, installed in on my last house, trying to get in on my current place, but the way the market is now with uncertainty over price and supply is having a hugely negative effect on our economy and the standard of living that we enjoy.

It needs someone with the guts and the will to stand up and say this is broken, let's fix it. Good luck.

BG
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
Agree, the market is too small for the competitive bidding process to work effectively without manipulation in its current form. RE supply should be required to bid it's quote as dispatchable, in that they must supply. Base load suppliers must declare their assets availability and been penalised for non supply.

Talk about deliberately missing the point to ride your hobby horse further down the road.

RE is not dispatchable (well, not wind and solar anyway) and forcing the market to treat it as such would be idiotic to put it bluntly. Do you want more expensive electricity? That's how you get more expensive electricity. Similarly, "base load" power is a fiction invented to justify the continued existence of non-dispatchable power supplies in an era that has the technology to move past them.

Neill's point was that a central authority of some description that can say at any time of day or night "fire up the Bobsville gas plant, we're heading into a four hour peak load" or "get the Smithtown battery ready to go, everyone's about to put the kettle on for half time at the grand final" or "geez it's blowing a gale in Fredburg, ask NSW if they need any help and if not we can power down the Woop-Woop coal plant for the night" can also PLAN a system that will actually bloody work, tell everyone in advance what the price of power will be to cover the costs of building the generation capacity, work towards cleaner power without blowing up the economy, AND build a distribution network that can actually cope.

You can't plan a "free" market, that's the whole bloody point. It should be abundantly clear to all concerned by now that electricity desperately needs planning. By all means franchise out the power stations if you must, and have competitive bidding for network maintenance contracts if you want the private sector involved, but take back control before it all goes down the gurgler.
potatoinmymouth
Talking about making a gross assumption and going with it.

One day I'm sure you'll tell me what my so called agenda is.

PLEASE FOCUS, I'll take it slow for you.
Currently the issue is you have people building windfarms, usually with a subsidy or incentive, regardless the price of power from things things is low. Remember this is what RE brigade publish all the time. However when the wind don't flow you need a back up. The problem is who is building the backup????

However currently in Oz, you have wind competing with base load forcing baseload to be less commercially viable and as such a number of closed and not replaced, unlike places like the Netherlands.


So fine, you follow the lead of some other networks OS where wind is made dispatchable by forcing them to provide a back-up for when the wind don't flow. As such it becomes dispatchable.    

Still with me?

So lets go with the brainless RE at all cost ideology that is currently been pushed. Currently there is about 4GW of wind in Australia, easily a 4GW or more proposed, planning or in some sort of development. Lets say it was 10GW all up. So when the wind is blowing and the load is 25GW with 4-5GW of solar during the day, you have 60% of the grid on wind./solar. What is coal supposed to do? Do this enough and eventually it will close. Meanwhile when the wind doesn't blow, then what? You think having 15GW of stand-by Open cycle gas is going to be feasible. What will be the price to have that level of infrastructure sitting there waiting, plus the gas supply, who will pay for the large gas mains?

If you haven't worked it out yet, both coal and gas turbines suffer from physics, yes I know the RE idealists don't understand the word physics having studied Art at school, but physics defines what can and cannot happen. And the biggest issue with both these is that the turn down efficiency is really really really poor. I'll give you an example. At work we had a gas turbine running at 50% output, efficiency = 18% that along with a steam turbine running at reduced efficiency to match demand, which basically meant that at full load it was burning almost the same about of CO2. Remember RE is all about reducing CO2.

Now, do you get my point or do you have your own agenda?

Neil's comments, I didn't disagree with and even said if it wasn't clear, the market is too small for competitive bidding to work effectively. However the damage is done now, nationalisation of the assets is not viable nor could the states or feds afford to do so.

And one thing I will agree with, yes the states need to take back control (doesn't equal ownership) and dictate what generation capacity should be available and provide the environment to invest. There are coal fired power stations being built for grids with power prices 2/3 of that of Australia, likewise closed cycle gas which is likely more economic these days if you can get the gas for the right price.

Again, please stick to the facts and not make BS claims of so called agendas.
  Andrewdr Station Master

Once upon a time each State Government took on the responsibility for providing power for its own state. Everything was fine except for when the miners went on strike. Then the Snowy Mountains Scheme came along and fed power to NSW and Victoria. That was still ok because the politicians and state quangos could still get their brains around how that worked.

Then along comes the smart people who said that private ownership and competition would keep prices lower. What they didn't admit was that this was a lie and that they really wanted the proceeds of the sales to squander on their pork barrelling and to allow their mates in high places to rip the population off with 'wink, wink no collusion here' pricing.

We now have a fragmented system where nobody takes responsibility for ensuring we have enough power, where individual states knowingly reduce capacity on ideological whims, and expected somebody else to help them out because we are the 'good climate conscious people'. Worse still power generators have no incentive to supply and so we get ridiculous situations where units are taken out by generators who know that the resulting higher price will benefit them. It is a rotten unworkable mess.

We need to get back to the situation where each state is responsible for providing power for its people and industry. By that way a reliable supply and the ensuing penalties through the ballot box can work.
That does not mean that SA and Victoria have to use brown coal generation, they can contract a permanent supply from black coal or gas or what ever from interstate, but that is their responsibility to arrange.
Individual states are also free to subsidise eco power however they like, but they cop the responsibility of back-up if the eco stuff is not available.

There are other models that would work, such as a National System, but it is fundamental that some structure be used that clearly sets out who has the responsibility, and authority for construction if need be, for the supply of reliable power. Eco power can be included and encouraged but this doesn't alleviate the prime requirement of reliable power.

The current situation reminds me of the birds I feed at home. They would rather spend time squabbling than actually getting in and eating.

Yes, what a mess all caused by bird brained politicians who have abrogated their responsibility to the people.

Neill
neillfarmer
Neill

A few points if I may.

There already is an existing authority in place that can instruct particular power generation capacity to be put on standby and ready to supply if needed. For example, the other day the standby liquid fuel plants in SA were activated on instruction from the AEMO and ended up putting some 205MW into the grid.

With the interconnectors in place (and more to come - eg the Riverland / SW NSW interconnector), the system is, and needs to be, managed as a national network, with power available and managed across all of the eastern states. For each state to try to produce sufficient power internally to meet their own demand at all times would lead to gross overcapacity and higher prices. Given the current (and likely future mix) of generation type and capacity, there will always be power flows back and forth across (what in reality are artificial) state borders. As a point of interest in this regard, SA is a net power exporter and NSW is a net importer. Also, as a result of an open tender, the ACT has contracted with the solar farm at Tailem Bend to supply a large proportion of its power.

A fundamental problem, now reported upon by 3 enquiries, is that the current system is structured in such a way as to allow (encourage?) gaming. For example, particular generators can be withheld to force up spot prices. When the price is sufficiently high, a successful bid can be made, which if successful, applies to ALL the current suppliers! What a system! Competition my foot.

Cheers
Andrew
  davesvline Chief Commissioner

Location: 1983-1998
Hahahaha.
Yallourn W was meant to be the next one switched off was it not??
Is so, according to Wiki it's 22% of Victoria's energy generation and 8% of the national marked.
After yesterday's efforts, with some generators already out for whatever's their excuse/reason, let's see how far that get up the pole before the latest advocate of such a closure gets slapped down?

And to think there's a cleared open space for the second part of Loy Yang B ready for building????. Didn't happen of course, cos Kennett flogged off the SEC first before it could be finished, and the last 2 planned 530MW generators didn't happen.
In light of recent events, perhaps the owners of Loy Yang B should be asked to build such?

At least we'd have newer capacity to supplement turning off old as needed, especially if we're going to be addicted to the RE thing. Nah, some would rather be exposed to another cluster F with no Hazelwood? More on them at the end of post.

I'm sure many would like to afford solar on our roofs til our hearts content, smile and raise the the middle finger to the power companies and not be without power when the grid drops..... However when it gets dark, it might pay to remember the humble pie is coming cos Mr Tesla's power wall ain't within your price range anytime soon????, and you'll be drawing from the grid again BUT it might still be down.

Don't want baseload, pls supply name and address to the authorities who decide who to load shed. You should be first. I'm all for views, political or otherwise, but those views should come with an agreement to be a victim of any consequences of them. That's only fair.

Regards
  kitchgp Chief Commissioner

Typical social media nonsense, the same people arguing the same rubbish from whatever personal political point of view guides their thinking.

Meanwhile we have an unreliable electricity supply and people around my area are forced to shut their businesses and lose income because we are load shedded off the grid.

Great effort all, well done, keep talking, posting your propoganda, that will really help us get back our produce, lost income etc etc.

BG
BrentonGolding

To paraphrase Neil from The Young Ones: “No one ever listens to us anyway. We might as well be a Leonard Cohen record.”
  DirtyBallast Chief Commissioner

Location: I was here first. You're only visiting.
Ignoring slanging matches and sticking to factuals instead:

(1) Yet another coal fired generator in Victoria (LY2) failed last night and is still offline. That meant that a paltry (not poultry) 2.9GW, or 60% of total capacity, was the best that could be expected and duly delivered from that archaic fuel source until LY3 (the one that went down with the boiler tube leak on Tuesday) came back online this evening. So much for reliable coal fired base load electricity generation.
(2) A follow up article regarding yesterday's load shedding quoted AEMO as saying that distributors chose areas where demand was highest. This should send a message to us all that if you want to be a pig with your consumption, you can expect to miss out in extreme circumstances.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-01-26/victorian-blackouts-what-caused-them-and-is-this-the-new-normal/10751412

Sponsored advertisement

Subscribers: bevans, RTT_Rules

Display from:   

Quick Reply

We've disabled Quick Reply for this thread as it was last updated more than six months ago.