Any Tasmanian sleeping carriages?

 
  GeoffreyHansen Minister for Railways

Location: In a FAM sleeper
Did any of the Tasmanian railways ever have sleeping carriages? If so between what years did they run and do any photos exist of them?

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  WimbledonW Chief Train Controller

Location: Sydney
Did any of the Tasmanian railways ever have sleeping carriages? If so between what years did they run and do any photos exist of them?
GeoffreyHansen
If you made a few return trips, than the journey time might be long enough to get to sleep on the way. Say A-B-A-B-A-B instead of just A-B. Smile
  tasrail Moderator

Location: Hobart
Two ex TMLR cars converted to Sleepers 1 and 2 by the TGR. In service 1891 to 1928, then occasional specials to 1935ish

Two side door cars converted to ABS1 & 2. In service 1906 to 1928 then occasional specials to 1940ish

Primary useage was the overnight mail trains, plus official trains and specials like circus trains

See ARHS Bulletins March 1991 and February 1986 for photos and details
  WimbledonW Chief Train Controller

Location: Sydney
Two ex TMLR cars converted to Sleepers 1 and 2 by the TGR. In service 1891 to 1928, then occasional specials to 1935ish

Two side door cars converted to ABS1 & 2. In service 1906 to 1928 then occasional specials to 1940ish

Primary useage was the overnight mail trains, plus official trains and specials like circus trains

See ARHS Bulletins March 1991 and February 1986 for photos and details
tasrail

Sleeping cars make sense for short journeys if they are parked in a quiet siding to make the journey last say 8 hours.

Queen Elizabeth made such a DOWN journey from Sydney to Orange, being parked in the UP refuge loop at Newbridge for a few hours.

She travelled wrong road from Gresham tto Newbridge to Newbridge, and special safeworking measures were applied, including clipping the points and hand signalling the "facing point locks".

This avoided having to shunt the train in the reverse direction into the Up loop.
  tasrail Moderator

Location: Hobart
The 1916 working timetable shows No. 44 ("Main Line Mixed") at 8.00pm and arriving Launceston at 6.55am. It was primarily a good train with carriage(s) attached

By comparison, the daytime express (No. 14) on the same route departed at 8.00am and arrived at 1.55pm
  BertR Station Master

Another thing about the mixed and non express services was they could be stopped at any set of crossing gates for pick up or set down of passengers. My dad just after the WWII was working near Evandale and caught an evening service on a Friday night from there and was dropped at a set of gates (still there) about a half mile from his home. I know, nothing to do with sleeper cars.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
Did any of the Tasmanian railways ever have sleeping carriages? If so between what years did they run and do any photos exist of them?
If you made a few return trips, than the journey time might be long enough to get to sleep on the way. Say A-B-A-B-A-B instead of just A-B. Smile
WimbledonW
Hobart to the NW coast (say Burnie or Wynyard) by passenger rail stopping at 15 or so stations using steam power would be worthy of a sleeper. Even today it takes a freight train around 8-10h and that's with the Latrobe diversion, likely far better track, far less crossing loops and less traffic using diesels.

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