Autonomous trucking

 
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-06-19/autonomous-trucks-hit-the-road-carrying-watermelons/100218538

The truck drove 1500 km in the USA with the drivers only actually in control at start and end, but on stand by in between.

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  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-06-19/autonomous-trucks-hit-the-road-carrying-watermelons/100218538

The truck drove 1500 km in the USA with the drivers only actually in control at start and end, but on stand by in between.
RTT_Rules

Worrying
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-06-19/autonomous-trucks-hit-the-road-carrying-watermelons/100218538

The truck drove 1500 km in the USA with the drivers only actually in control at start and end, but on stand by in between.

Worrying
bevans
Automation of road vehicles will happen, just a matter of when and its sooner than many think.

Currently there seems some difficultly in dealing with certain aspects of road markings so they are talking getting high resolution data of major highways in the USA to prevent further delays. These would updated routinely through both surveys but also machining learning from the traffic using the road live. For example one car hits a new potline, this is fed back to a central system and cars following would avoid the pothole.

The benefit of focusing on major highways is that the trucking industry which is where the money is can progress faster to autonomous driving.

100% Autonomous vehicles on a highway currently would have few issues with their own interaction. However throw in a manually driven vehicle and this where it can get messy.
  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales
Another misplaced solution looking for a problem.  Imagine the road clogging if it came here.
  Lockspike Chief Commissioner

Automation of road vehicles will happen, just a matter of when and its sooner than many think.
RTT_Rules
Technically, automation of road vehicles is almost upon us.

Sorting out liability of when things go wrong is going to take a while.

Currently the driver of a wayward vehicle is the person held responsible.

Remove the driver from the equation, and who is going to put their hand up and take the responsibility? The road authority? The vehicle builder? The automation software designer? I'm sure there will be plenty of other parties in the mix.

I can see some interesting court cases coming up, and with such cases establishing legal precedent they will have far reaching consequences.
It will be even more interesting if different jurisdictions go various ways.
  Madjikthise Deputy Commissioner

I can see the blame going to a corporation, where they put aside money for lawsuits instead of fixing problems because it's cheaper.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
Automation of road vehicles will happen, just a matter of when and its sooner than many think.
Technically, automation of road vehicles is almost upon us.

Sorting out liability of when things go wrong is going to take a while.

Currently the driver of a wayward vehicle is the person held responsible.

Remove the driver from the equation, and who is going to put their hand up and take the responsibility? The road authority? The vehicle builder? The automation software designer? I'm sure there will be plenty of other parties in the mix.

I can see some interesting court cases coming up, and with such cases establishing legal precedent they will have far reaching consequences.
It will be even more interesting if different jurisdictions go various ways.
Lockspike
Its not complicated and mostly known.

If the automation level of the vehicle needs a driver behind the wheel, its still with the driver and why I believe in Tesla you have to each time you use 'Autopilot', acknowledge this. Note, the name 'Autopilot' probably needs review.

If the level of the automation is rated at non-driver level, I think its called Level 5, then it gets down to two factors.

1) Supplier of the vehicle, such as Ford carries the end user liability as they do now which is why car companies are usually global leaders in QC/QA of their supply chains.

2) Road owner, the expected issue for early generations of Level 5 is that it will rely heavily on compliance to providing road signs and lane markings in good order.

So the lawyers will be arguing who owns the blame and the judge will assign a level of % depending in the circumstances.
  Big J Deputy Commissioner

Location: In Paradise
Anyone that watches dash cam clips on YouTube will understand that this is a lonnnnnnnngggggggggg way off, particularly for Australia for the unleashing of these onto public roads.

Makes total sense for controlled environments such as mine sites, but to suggest that this is an imminent change is under estimating risks of the interaction of the public, let alone our wonderful wildlife for long haul.

This reminds me of Tesla promises of this tech. Maybe the company featured in the article might be in a process of seeking further capital. Seems to be the game play for these businesses.

The doubt that I will be seeing auto trucks driving up the Bruce highway in the next 10 years let alone Tesla cars that have long promised that the tech is already here.

As others said the complexity of risk allocation cannot be ignored. I would hate to be the coder writing the decision point for avoiding or taking out a living creature in different scenarios. I imagine their bias will be to protect the vehicle occupants at all cost, irrespective of the cost it causes outside of the vehicle.

If we were to see auto trucks, it does make sense on SA/WA and NT highways, but I doubt very much the line marking is continuous and reliable. Whereas the Hume in terms of markings would be perfect, but the way people drive, it will be carnage.

So maybe that they need to be running on private roads. Maybe they should be on exclusive corridors. Maybe they can then haul multiple trailers. Maybe they should run on rails to be more efficient. Maybe the exiting rail corridors on the east coast should be fixed.

Ahh, are auto trucks a solution for a problem that should be fixed using a different solution, ie fix rail alignment for more efficient transportation tasking?
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
Anyone that watches dash cam clips on YouTube will understand that this is a lonnnnnnnngggggggggg way off, particularly for Australia for the unleashing of these onto public roads.

Makes total sense for controlled environments such as mine sites, but to suggest that this is an imminent change is under estimating risks of the interaction of the public, let alone our wonderful wildlife for long haul.

This reminds me of Tesla promises of this tech. Maybe the company featured in the article might be in a process of seeking further capital. Seems to be the game play for these businesses.

The doubt that I will be seeing auto trucks driving up the Bruce highway in the next 10 years let alone Tesla cars that have long promised that the tech is already here.

As others said the complexity of risk allocation cannot be ignored. I would hate to be the coder writing the decision point for avoiding or taking out a living creature in different scenarios. I imagine their bias will be to protect the vehicle occupants at all cost, irrespective of the cost it causes outside of the vehicle.

If we were to see auto trucks, it does make sense on SA/WA and NT highways, but I doubt very much the line marking is continuous and reliable. Whereas the Hume in terms of markings would be perfect, but the way people drive, it will be carnage.

So maybe that they need to be running on private roads. Maybe they should be on exclusive corridors. Maybe they can then haul multiple trailers. Maybe they should run on rails to be more efficient. Maybe the exiting rail corridors on the east coast should be fixed.

Ahh, are auto trucks a solution for a problem that should be fixed using a different solution, ie fix rail alignment for more efficient transportation tasking?
Big J
Yep, and there are video's of tesla's auto driving on rural highways.

The software in the current Fleet of Tesla's is not suited nor rated as self driving without a driver and never been claimed to do so.

Risk management is not the roll of the coder, this comes from a larger pool of decision makers more suited to considering legal, ethical, mechanical etc. As such animals would not be placed ahead of occupant or other road user safer as it legally doesn't now. You swerve to avoid an animal and cause greater harm, its on you.

Auto-truck is to solve the logistics issue that isn't naturally solved by rail, however while it will certainly compete with rail on a cost basis, its also a warning for rail to move towards similar changes, for example auto driving on regional networks. For this and also applies to trucks, we need to stop hiding behind the misguided view that train drivers in charge of 5000 t mile long trains actually avoid on track collisions such as LX where as auto cannot.  

Anyway, auto truck won't happen tomorrow, but its clearly getting closer, my guess we will start seeing it in pilot form between 2025 and 2030.

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